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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 11/11/13--15:32: Domino Toppling Videos
  • About

    Domino Toppling Videos are recordings of elaborate domino arrangements toppling to the ground, many of which operate in a similar fashion to Rube Goldberg machines.

    Origin

    On September 30th, 2006, YouTuber FlippyCat posted a video featuring several domino toppling tracks (shown below), which received over 5.25 million views and 4,900 comments in the following eight years.



    Spread

    On November 23rd, 2006, YouTuber Rondell Paul uploaded footage of a record-breaking four million domino toppling (shown below, left), which gathered upwards of 2.8 million views and 4,800 comments in the next seven years. On April 14th, 2007, YouTuber Mike Perrucci uploaded a video showing the toppling of 5,292 dominoes (shown below, right). Within seven years, the video garnered more than 19.1 million views and 23,500 comments.



    On February 1st, 2008, YouTuber piratesofthevideo uploaded footage of various large objects being toppled at a supermarket in Finland (shown below, left), which received upwards of 3.6 million views and 200 comments in the first six years. On February 13th, 2009, YouTuber FlippyCat posted a video titled “Bowling for Dominoes,” in which approximately 4,800 dominoes are toppled in the shape of a bowling lane (shown below, right). Within five years, the video accumulated over 10.7 million views and 5,100 comments.



    On July 24th, 2010, YouTuber IIIIIDominoIIIII uploaded footage of 125,000 falling dominoes (shown below, left), which gained more than 8.5 million views and 17,000 comments in the next four years. On April 7th, 2011, YouTuber dominofan238 posted a video featuring several different toppling domino tricks (shown below, right). In the following three years, the video gathered upwards of 9.5 million views and 3,200 comments.



    On May 11th, 2012, YouTuber FlippyCat uploaded a time lapse video showing 60,000 dominoes being stacked prior to being toppled (shown below, left), accumulating over 2.8 million views and 3,200 comments in two years. On November 10th, 2013, YouTuber Hevesh5 posted footage of a variety of domino toppling tricks (shown below, right), gaining more than 1.56 million views and 5,600 comments in the first 24 hours.



    Notable Examples



    Notable Artists

    Search Interest


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  • 11/11/13--22:07: Gran Turismo
  • About

    Gran Turismo is a racing game that most people cherish for its simplistic gameplay (Until Gran Turismo 4), beautiful graphics, and simple controls, starting way back in the PlayStation Era, it got an unexpected reputation, and was loved by many people.

    History

    It all started back in 1992 when racecar driver Kazunori Yamauchi and seven other people started to work on the original Gran Turismo, this project was in development for five years, 180 licensed cars were in the game, and the game sold more than 10,000,000 Million copies, after that Gran Turismo 2 was immediately in development, the game took 2 Years to finish and had 650 licensed cars in the game, it was the last Gran Turismo game for the PlayStation 1 to ever come out.

    Playstation 2 Era (History)

    Another Gran Turismo game didn’t release until 2001, Gran Turismo 3: A-Spec was released and it was a hit, the game was sometimes regarded by many fans as the best Gran Turismo ever, this was because of its stunning graphics for a game that was released in 2001, where most other games were still improving in graphics, gameplay, and technical functions, Gran Turismo 3 did have atleast one little flaw, that was the shortage of cars, but this was only because the Polyphony Digital team worked on the graphics, more than adding cars, but still people didn’t really care about that, the game was simple, and fun.

    After Gran Turismo 3, Gran Turismo 4 was in development, it was to be an improvement of Gran Turismo 3, being in production for about a good 3 years, a lot of things were changed in GT4, it was no longer simple, it had more cars, Used Cars wereback again, 6 Unique black cars were in the game, and there were more realistic tracks.

    Playstation 3 Era (History)

    Sooner after awhile, Gran Turismo 5 was released, and it wasn’t liked as much by the fans, but was still liked a lot, it was a bit too complex for casual gamers, and looked further into the actual simulation genre, right now Gran Turismo 6 is in development, and it will come out for PlayStation 3, but a PlayStation 4 version will come out sooner after the release of the PlayStation 4

    Reception

    The Gran Turismo series was a hit, most people say that Gran Turismo is one of the best series in the gaming industry, selling over 56,000,000 Million copies worldwide, Gran Turismo also started a lot of other realistic driving simulators, its rival being Forza Motorsport, and right now people are arguing about which is better, Gran Turismo or Forza Motorsport, right now Gran Turismo 6 and Forza Motorsport 5 are in development and everyone is hyped about it.

    Search Interest


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    About

    The Great Wall of China Guy is a nickname given to an Asian man who accidentally photobombed a Redditor’s photograph of the famous fortification. Upon its submission to Reddit, the image inspired several dozens of photoshopped parodies overnight.

    Origin

    On November 11th, 2013, Redditor Hipsterthug submitted a photograph he took of the Badaling section of the Great Wall with an Asian tourist partially blocking the foreground to the /r/funny subreddit in a post titled “I tried to take a picture of the Great Wall.” The photograph was quickly declared the next “In the Way Guy” and met by several photoshopped instances in the comments. The post garnered more than 29,000 up votes and 979 comments in less than 24 hours.



    Spread

    Between the evening of November 11th and early hours of the following day, at least five photoshopped instances featuring the Asian tourist’s face were submitted to /r/funny, using “I tried to take a picture of…” as the snowclone for titles. On November 12th, Redditor Gfbell re-submitted the same image in an /r/photoshopbattles cross-post titled "Great Wall of China Guy, spawning several dozens of additional instances using the Asian tourist’s face as an exploitable image.

    Notable Examples





    Template



    External References


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    About

    Googled It, Was Not Disappointed is an expression used to introduce humorous, surprising or bizarre photographs found by submitted queries in Google Images search.

    Origin

    On April 3rd, 2012, Redditor 3210atown submitted a post titled “I Googled Definition of Swag and was not disappointed” to the /r/funny[2] subreddit, which linked to an image macro of a royal cat being dressed by cherubs with the caption “Swag” (shown below). Prior to being archived, the post gained over 10,700 up votes and 160 comments.



    Spread

    On May 1st, 2012, Redditor Solleks132 submitted a post titled “Googled Nic Cage as a Baby” to the /r/funny[3] subreddit, which linked to a photoshopped image of a baby with the face of actor Nicolas Cage. Before the post was archived, it garnered more than 10,100 up votes and 100 comments. On August 16th, Redditor Rsrulesusuk submitted a post titled “Googled ‘Majestic Creature’ and was not disappointed” to the /r/funny[4] subreddit, featuring a photoshopped image of a giant man’s face superimposed over a marine animal at an aquarium (shown below, right). The post received over 4,600 up votes and 30 comments prior to archival.



    On October 22nd, 2012, FunnyJunk[5] user alligoesrawrr submitted a digitally altered photograph titled “Googled God of the Internet,” featuring a cat jumping in the sky (shown below, left). On February 7th, 2013, Redditor blechniven submitte a post titled “Searched for ‘wut’ in Google Images, was not disappointed” to the /r/funny[6] subreddit, which highlighted a photoshopped picture of the Death Child image macro character with several bizarre non sequitur statements (shown below, right). Prior to being archived, the post gathered more than 1,400 up votes and 35 comments.



    On August 12th, Redditor millre01 submitted an image titled “Googled FF-VII cosplay. Was not disappointed,” featuring a cosplayer dressed as the character Cloud from the 1997 role-playing game Final Fantasy VII juxtaposed with a screenshot of the character in-game (shown below, left) to the /r/gaming[7] subreddit. In the first three months, the post gained upwards of 6,500 up votes and 100 comments. On October 19th, 9gag[1] user pericotorro posted an illustration of the superhero Batman titled “Googled ‘Beautiful Batman.’ Was not disappointed” (shown below). In the next month, the post received more than 23,000 up votes and 6,850 Facebook shares.



    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References


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  • 11/12/13--14:15: Jimmy Kimmel
  • About

    Jimmy Kimmel is an American comedian and actor who is best known as a co-host of Comedy Central’s The Man Show and the host of ABC’s late-night talk show Jimmy Kimmel Live!. The comedian has been credited with producing a number of viral videos and recurring segments that involve audience participation through social media channels.

    Online History

    On January 16th, 2009, the Jimmy Kimmel Live YouTube channel was launched. In the first five years, the channel gathered more than 3.43 million subscribers and 789,000 video views. On March 2nd, 2010, Kimmel arranged a meeting between Cody, then a three-year-old Justin Bieber fan whose crying video had gone viral earlier that week, and the pop star himself (shown below, left). In the next four years, the clip gained upwards of 52.9 million views and 84,000 comments. On June 18th, Kimmel released a music video for the comedy song “Channing All Over Your Tatum” (shown below, right), garnering 12.7 million views and 16,000 comments in the following five months.



    Social Media Presence

    On December 8th, 2009, the official Jimmy Kimmel Live Facebook[1] page was launched, garnering upwards of 630,000 likes in the first four years. As of November 2013, the @JimmyKimmel Twitter[2] feed has accumulated over 3.2 million followers.

    Highlights

    I Told My Kids I Ate All Their Halloween Candy

    On November 2nd, 2011, the channel uploaded a montage of fan-filmed videos of parents fooling their children into thinking they ate all their Halloween candy (shown below). Within two years, the video accumulated over 45 million views and 66,000 comments.



    I Gave My Kids a Terrible Present

    On December 12th, 2011, the channel featured a montage of fan-filmed footage in which parents give their children undesirable presents (shown below), gathering more than 26 million views and 27,400 comments in the following 23 months. On March 22nd, 2012, Kimmel introduced a segment with various celebrities reading aloud insulting tweets directed at them (shown below, right). Within the first 20 months, the video gained upwards of 12 million views and 7,400 comments.



    Celebrities Read Mean Tweets

    On March 22nd, 2012, Kimmel introduced a segment with various celebrities reading aloud insulting tweets directed at them (shown below). Within the first 20 months, the video gained upwards of 12 million views and 7,400 comments.



    Lie Witness News

    On April 23rd, 2013, Kimmel aired an episode of the segment “Lie Witness News,” in which attendees at the music festival Coachella were asked what they thought about bands that do not exist (shown below). In the next seven months, the video received over 12.5 million views and 9,100 comments.



    Twerk Fail Hoax

    On September 3rd, 2013, YouTuber Caitlin Heller uploaded a video titled “Worst Twerk Fail Ever – Girl Catches Fire!”, in which a young woman’s pants appear to catch fire after being knocked over while performing a twerk dance move (shown below, left). Within 13 weeks, the video received over 14 million views and 22,300 comments. On September 9th, Kimmel revealed that the video was a hoax orchestrated by the talk show (shown below, right).



    Controversies

    Feud With Kanye West

    In September of 2013, Kimmel participated in a feud with rapper Kanye West after mocking a BBCRadio 1 interview with the performer (shown below, left) along with a clip of two children parodying the video (shown below, right).



    China Genocide Skit

    On October 16th, 2013, a segment titled “Kids’ Table” aired on Jimmy Kimmel Live, in which a child suggested that the United States “kill everyone in China” in order to solve its debt problem (shown below).



    On October 19th, a petition was created on the White House’s We the People[6] website calling for the Obama administration to shutdown the show (shown below, left). On the following day, another petition was created on the website Change.org[5] calling for ABC to terminate Kimmel’s employment (shown below, right).



    On October 28th, ABC an official apology for the statement:

    “We offer our sincere apology. We would never purposefully broadcast anything to upset the Chinese community, Asian community, anyone of Chinese descent or any community at large. Our objective is to entertain. We took swift action to minimize the distribution of the skit by removing it from all public platforms available to us and editing it out of any future airings of the show. We hope our actions and our apology effectively address your concerns. Thank you for bringing this to our attention.”

    On November 1st, Kimmel released an apology letter[4] claiming he did not intend to upset anyone for the “Kids’ Table” segment, noting that the comment was unscripted and made by a six-year-old child. On November 8th, ABC[3] issued another apology for the segment, claiming that the television station’s systems “did not function properly” and that they had taken steps to avoid similar mistakes. On the following day, hundreds of protesters reportedly gathered at ABC Studios in several locations in the United States, calling for ABC to fire Kimmel and holding signs containing a photoshopped picture of the talk show host as deceased German dictator Adolf Hitler (shown below).



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Facebook – Jimmy Kimmel Live

    [2]Twitter – @JimmyKimmel

    [3]ABC Medianet – ABC Medianet

    [4]ABC Medianet – ABC Medianet

    [5]Change.org – Stop Jimmy Kimmel and ABC from promoting genocide

    [6]We the People – Investigate Jimmy Kimmel


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    About

    Antonio Banderas’ Laptop Reaction is an animated computer reactionGIF of Spanish actor Antonio Banderas laughing smugly in front of a laptop computer in a scene from the 1995 action thriller film Assassins.

    Origin

    On March 22nd, 2013, Redditor Salisburymistake posted the earliest known instance of the GIF in an /r/reactiongifs post titled "MRW I typed “boobs” into Google’s new animated image search."[1] The post garnered more than 5,500 up votes and 155 comments prior to being archived.



    The Scene

    The GIF comes from an offbeat scene from the 1995 American action thriller film Assassins wherein Miguel Bain (played by Antonio Banderas), a young sociopathic contract killer, is offered a contract to kill his his competitor and rival assassin Robert Rath (played by Sylvester Stallone). Delighted upon seeing the digitally transmitted image of Rath on his laptop screen, Bain then lets out an indiscernible noise (“ohooooooooooooo”) as to savor the moment.



    Spread

    On March 28th, about a week after Redditor Salisburymistake submitted the reaction GIF, Redditor Shmutzical used the image in an /r/funny post titled “Logging in and finding out that it is your cake day.”[2] On April 16th, Redditor Tman916x posted the same image in a /r/reactionGIFs post titled “When I jokingly ask a cute girl for nudie pics and she obliges,”[3] receiving 302 up votes and 32 comments. By May 5th, the GIF had been introduced as a “you got me” reaction face on the Internet humor site I Run The Internet.[15] On May 26th, Redditor Mushroomwig[4], a self-described PlayStation fan, used the GIF to convey his reaction to the backlash against Microsoft’s XBox One at the E3 convention.



    On June 10th, Bodybuilding Forum member BloodFireDeath shared the image from I Run The Internet in a discussion thread titled “ITT the greatest GIF of 2013,”[7] in which many other members seconded the OP’s notion. Throughout the summer of 2013, the reaction face continued to grow in popularity on Bodybuilding Forum.[8][9] In early November, the reaction image became closely associated with the forthcoming release of PlayStation 4 on NeoGAF.[10][11]

    Search Interest



    External References


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  • 11/12/13--18:22: Dad Jokes
  • (Work in Progress)

    About

    Dad Jokes are jokes that parody the humor that fathers have, similar to that of Trolldad. These jokes commonly take the form of a snowclone.

    Origin

    (Researching)

    Spread

    While the term “dad jokes” was commonly used to refer to the form of humor since the 90’s, the term grew in popularity in 2013.

    External Links

    [1]tumblr – tagged: dad jokes

    [2]reddit – /r/dadjokes

    [3]twitter – #dadjokes

    [4]buzzfeed – 27 Cringe-Worthy Dad Jokes You Can’t Help But Laugh At


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  • 11/12/13--22:56: This. Fucking. Bitch.
  • “This. Fucking. Bitch” first surfaced on 4chan’s famous /b/ threads. On November 10th, 2013, an Anon posted in a thread originally posted to bring notice to a facebook rant, where a user was tainting the use of soldiers to invade other countries. The facebook user, named “Peachless Slattery” wrote on her wall during Veterans day:

    When the topic of discussion was a serious note, when the anon posted this soon-to-be famous copy pasta, the post received numerous of replies, majoring in angry protests, and some agreements.

    The following day, the pasta was posted yet again, but this time as a thread. Numerous newfags replied with hateful comments, yet some still agreement. Anons from the previous thread on the 10th, where the pasta was born, went along with it. Replying in major agreement, and even chipping their own version of pasta as well.

    November 12th, two days after the surfacing of the new pasta, marked the first real trolling. When the pasta was threaded into a completely off-topic subject, the posting anon received a glamorous array of angry newfags.

    The pasta also raised a new hate for Americans among the foreign anons crawling /b/. Whenever posted, the pasta usually recieves an overwhelming amount of hate towards the citizens of the United States. Confirming to be a successful pasta, newfags continue to fall for the trap.

    In the early morning of November 13th, an anon posted the first version of “This. Fucking. Bitch” pasta with a different message. Rewording it, the anon made it a rant towards console-fags. Claiming to be the P.C. master race. In reply, hundreds of angry console-fags, unknowing to the pasta, typed away angrily and sent their hate towards OP. However, little did they know, they were some of the first to fall victim to this newborn pasta.

    Although the copy-pasta usually includes an image of a bitch.jpg, some have taken it upon themselves to unleash the pasta in threads about men. Changing the first three lines to: “This. Fucking. Man.”, although it’s scarce and not as meaningful.

    It’s unknown whether or not the anon who first surfaced the pasta meant to make it a widespread of trolling, or he was sincere. He, confirming it was him although the lack of ID’s cannot proof it was in fact him, continued to respond to the angry protesters against him.


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  • 11/13/13--14:03: What Would I Say?
  • About

    What Would I Say? is a web application that can generate uniquely personalized sentences based on each user’s personal records of status updates on Facebook.

    History

    The application “What Would I Say?” was developed by Princeton graduates Pawel Przytycki, Ugne Klibaite, Vicky Yao, Daniel Jiang, Edward Young, Harvey Cheng and Alex Furger over the course of 72 hours during the annual HackPrinceton[4] Hackathon in early November 2013. The app, which can generate personalized sentences by running each user’s history of Facebook status updates through a series of Markov algorithms[3], was subsequently released via Google’s App Spot.[1]



    Online Presence

    On November 12th, the application moved to the domain What-Would-I-Say.com.[2] The same day, several news sites published articles about the web app, including Gawker,[7] Slate,[8] Business Insider,[9] One the Media,[10] The Huffington Post,[11] BuzzFeed,[12] International Business Times[13] and The New Yorker.[5] Also on November 12th, Redditor bigbluegrass submitted a link to the site to the /r/InternetIsBeautiful[6] subreddit, where others submitted examples of generated status updates in the comment section. On the following day, the keyphrase “what would I say” was listed as the most searched query of the day on Google Trends “Hot Search” index (shown below) and the site was shared over 1.2 million times according to the Facebook Graph API.[14]



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/14/13--09:31: Side Eyeing Chloe
  • About

    Side Eyeing Chloe is a photoshop meme based on a screen capture of a concerned-looking little girl in a YouTube video of two children reacting to their parents’ announcement of a surprise trip to Disneyland that went viral in September 2013.

    Origin

    On September 12th, 2013, YouTuber KAftC[1] uploaded a video titled “Lily’s Disneyland Surprise… AGAIN,” which shows two sisters, Lily and Chloe, reacting to the news of a surprise trip to Disneyland on their way to school. As the older sister, Lily, breaks into tears of joy, Chloe is briefly seen on camera with a disturbed look on her face.



    Spread

    On September 18th, Tumblr user Lee[2] submitted an animated GIF photo set of highlights from the YouTube video, including one of Chloe reacting to her sister’s crying, with the caption “i just love this because chloe is like ‘da hell is this girl cryin about.’” In less than a month, the post gained more than 895,700 notes.



    On September 24th, BuzzFeed[8] picked up on Lee’s GIF photo set in a post titled “Girl Reacting To Disneyland Is The Only Reaction You’ll Need For Anything Ever.” On November 1st, Tumblr user Yungbasedblogger[3] uploaded a reaction image based on a screenshot of Chloe’s reaction with the caption “could u fucking not,” racking up over 120,000 notes in two weeks.



    By November 5th, a single topic blog named Chloe Queen of Everything[4] had been launched to showcase a series of photoshopped images featuring the face of Chloe on celebrities. On November 13th, BuzzFeed[7] reported on the parody phenomenon in an image compilation post titled “Side-Eyeing Chloe Is Officially The Patron Saint Of Tumblr.”



    External References


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  • 11/14/13--14:01: Unidan
  • About

    Unidan is the Reddit handle of biologist Ben Eisenkop who is known for providing pertinent scientific information in Reddit threads regarding biology or ecology, often introducing himself with the declaration “biologist here!”

    Online History

    On September 23rd, 2009, Eisenkop created his Unidan Reddit account. On June 1st, 2010, Eisenkop submitted his first post on Reddit,[7] featuring a giant water balloon popping in slow motion (shown below). The post was not well received, gathering 4 up votes and 5 down votes prior to being archived.



    On September 23rd, 2010, Eisenkop posted his first comment with the declaration “biologist here” when describing the role of nipple stimulation in lactation on the /r/IAmA[8] subreddit. On April 5th, 2012, Eisenkop posted a comment in the /r/pics[9] subreddit explaining how pineapples can cause cracks on a tongue due to the presence of the enzyme bromelain, which received over 1,500 up votes prior to being archived. On June 14th, Unidan identified an organism in a photo posted to the /r/pics[10] subreddit as a piure (shown below). Before it was archived, the comment gathered more than 6,000 up votes.



    On August 4th, the /r/Unidanfans[1] subreddit was created for discussions related to the popular Reddit biologist. On January 12th, 2013, Eisenkop provided tips on spotting sloths in Costa Rica in a post on the /r/pics[11] subreddit, to which Redditor CrownRabbit responded that he tagged Unidan as “Most Useful Biology Here.” On April 25th, Unidan participated in an “ask me anything” (AMA) thread on the /r/IAmA[13] subreddit, where he answered questions about his personal life and provided several biological science factoids. Before the post was archived, it received upwards of 13,000 up votes and 7,300 comments, making it the 6th most up voted /r/IAmA thread as of November 2013. On the following day, the tech news blog Mashable[2] published an article on Eisenkop’s growing popularity on Reddit. On August 4th, a post about the Unidan Reddit account was submitted to the /r/MuseumOfReddit[6] subreddit. On September 23rd, Eisenkop submitted a photo album to the /r/pics[15] subreddit, containing photographs he had taken over the years as a field biologist (shown below). In the first month, the post received over 24,000 up votes and 1,700 comments.



    On November 10th, Urban Dictionary[12] user Cloicabforreal submitted an entry for Unidan, defining it as “a name given to anybody that is extremely knowledgable about a given subject.” On November 14th, The Daily Dot[4] published an interview with Eisenkop,

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/14/13--14:41: Andy Kaufman's Daughter Hoax
  • Overview

    Andy Kaufman’s Daughter Hoax was a ruse perpetrated by New York-based actress Alexandra Tatarsky, who claimed to be the daughter of deceased American comedian Andy Kaufman and asserted that he was still alive during the closing ceremony of the 9th Annual Andy Kaufman Awards held in November 2013. Though eventually revealed as a hoax, Tatarsky’s claim quickly rekindled the enduring celebrity rumor that the comedian never died of lung cancer and faked his own death in May of 1984.[3]

    Background

    On November 11th, 2013, Michael Kaufman read a letter allegedly written by his brother Andy at the Andy Kaufman Awards in New York City, claiming that he was still alive and living in seclusion with a woman with whom he’d had a daughter. Kaufman subsequently invited Tatarsky onstage, who claimed to be the daughter of Kaufman and that the comedian had staged his own death before going into hiding in May of 1984.



    Notable Developments

    On November 12th, Andy Kaufman Awards finalist Killy Dwyer posted a Facebook status update commenting on Tatarsky’s appearance at the award show, referring to it as a “mindfuck.”






    The same day, the comedy news blog The Comic’s Comic[5] published an article about the event. On the following day, the celebrity news blog TMZ[4] posted a video of Tatarsky speaking at the Andy Kaufman Awards.

    Identity Revealed

    On November 14th, The Smoking Gun[2] reported that Tatarsky was an actress recruited by Kaufman to pose as his brother’s daughter after the pair met earlier in the year at a Manhattan art gallery exhibition featuring artifacts from the late comedian’s life. In the coming days, several news sites reported on the hoax, including Gawker,[1]USA Today,[6] Fox News,[7] New York Daily News,[8] Snopes[10] and The Daily Mail.[11]



    Michael Kaufman’s Response

    Also on November 14th, The Hollywood Reporter[9] published an article about the hoax, which included a quote from Michael Kaufman claiming he had been “misquoted.”

    “I think I’ve been misquoted, OK? I never came out with, ’He’s alive.’ I’m as skeptical as anybody else.”

    External References


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  • 11/15/13--11:55: #AskJPM
  • Overview

    #AskJPM was a promotional hashtag launched by the American multinational banking company J. P. Morgan to provide college students an opportunity to communicate directly with a senior executive in November 2013. However, upon its launch, the hashtag was immediately hijacked by Twitter users criticizing and mocking the company for its alleged unethical business practices.

    Background

    On November 6th, 2013, the official J.P. Morgan Twitter feed announced that it would be hosting a live Q&A session with Vice Chairman Jimmy Lee on November 14th:




    Hashtag Hijacked

    On November 11th, Twitter users began asking humorous and critical questions using the #AskJMP hashtag, many of which accused the company of being greedy and participating in unethical business practices.




    Notable Developments

    Q&A Canceled

    On November 13th, the @jpmorgan Twitter feed announced that the Q&A had been cancelled and was a “bad idea.” In the first 48 hours, the tweet received upwards of 1,400 retweets and 680 favorites.




    Following the cancellation, Twitter users began using the #AskJPM hashtag with more frequency. According to the Twitter analytics site Topsy,[1] tweets containing the #AskJPM hashtag peaked on November 13th with over 27,700 mentions (shown below).



    News Media Coverage

    On November 13th, several news sites published articles about the hashtag backlash, including the New York Post,[2] the New York Times Dealbook blog,[3] The Huffington Post,[4] Business Insider[5] and The Wall Street Journal.[6] On November 14th, several notable tweets were read aloud by host Stacy Keach on the CNBC true crime television program American Greed (shown below).



    Notable Examples

    In the coming days, compilations of notable example tweets using the #AskJPM hashtag were posted on several business news sites, including ZDNet,[7] The Street[8] and Marketplace.[9]



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/15/13--14:59: Console War GIFs
  • About

    Console War GIFs are animated GIF images representing the rivalries between the Xbox, PlayStation and Nintendo Wii video game consoles, which are often posted in video game-related discussion forums and subreddits.

    Origin

    On June 5th, 2012, the Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) was held in Los Angeles, California, where Microsoft unveiled several upcoming games and new features for the Xbox 360, Sony presented new games and updates to the PlayStation and Nintendo showed titles for the Wii U and Nintendo 3DS. During the conference, many animated GIFs depicting the three companies engaging in battle (shown below) were posted in a thread on the NeoGAF Forums.[7]


    e

    Spread

    On February 10th, 2013, Redditor deepbrown submitted an animated GIF to the /r/PS3[6] subreddit, featuring representatives from the various console companies edited into footage from the 2009 science fiction film Star Trek (shown below). In the comments section, Redditor iDecline provided links to several other console wars animated GIFs. Prior to being archived, the post gathered over 840 up votes and 80 comments.



    On May 17th, IGN Forums[2] member started a “console war GIFs” thread. On June 11th, the 2013 E3 convention was held, where details were released for the upcoming Xbox One and PS 4 consoles. On the same day, Odd Future Talk Forums[1] member Figger submitted a thread asking for users to submit the “best GIFs” pertaining to the Xbox One and PS 4 console wars. Also on June 11th, the college lifestyle blog Coed[4] published a compilation of notable PS4 vs. Xbox Tumblr GIFs.



    On June 21st, the pop culture blog Heavy posted a compilation of notable console war GIFs. On August 29th, 9gag[5] user abdozkert submitted an animated GIF featuring several Pokemon representing different video game consoles (shown below). In the next 10 weeks, the post garnered upwards of 6,000 up votes and 2,300 shares.



    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    Not available

    External References


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    Jimmy Neutron Happy Family Happy Hour is a YouTube video uploaded on August 14th, 2013 by seinfeldspitstain that gained popularity because of its strange content. As of November 16th, 2013, this video has 1,262,766 views on YouTube. The creator says it was inspired by a dream. This video contains phrases which are YouTube memes as of right now, such as “The pizza is aggressive.” and “Bond with me, Jimmy.”

    The story is that Jimmy Nutrin (as pronounced in the video), his mother, and his father are at home; when his mother is about to make a “delicious dinner meal,” Hugh shoots her with a rifle that seems to appear from nowhere, then telling Jimmy to “do an order of pizza for dinner.” Jimmy floats over to the phone and orders one. Hugh creeps up behind him, telling him it is time for “father-son bonding,” which consists of them sitting on the couch watching TV. Jimmy is at gunpoint, and Hugh is holding the gun. The doorbell rings and Jimmy opens it. The delivery man says, “Here’s your pizza,” and the pizza launches across the room, bounces off the wall, and after Jimmy notes, “The pizza is aggressive,” it decapitates Hugh and lands on the ground. The next shot consists of Hugh’s head on the floor, Jimmy’s now-dead mom on the ground in the back, the pizza next to the couch on the ground, and Jimmy looking into the room. Commenting on the events that just took place, Jimmy says, breaking the fourth wall, “Just another day in the life of Jimmy Nutrin.” His eyes become large to the point of popping out of his head, and his mouth elongates and closes, his bottom lip repositioning itself in an awkward position.

    This video has gained appeal because of its notable quotes and images along with the creepy background music. The uploader, seinfeldspitstain, has uploaded other videos of unsettling computer-generated plots and characters, mostly involving Jimmy Neutron characters. His more recent uploads have escaped this theme, however, seinfeldspitspain saying that the Jimmy Nutrin video is a dead joke as characterized in the sequel where Jimmy is buried in Dead Joke Cemetery along with other deadpooled memes including “le,” “over 9000,” and “arrow to the knee.”


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    About:
    Ostrich Dance/Sweatshirt Monsters is a viral video trend that Involves one putting their legs into the arms holes of a Sweatshirt or hoodie and their head through the neck hole. Resulting in the participant taking on a Monsters/Ostrich appearance .Sweatshirt Monsters/Ostrich Dance is commonly used in youtube videos and gifs.

    Origin:
    The trend originated from Youtube on Jun 8, 2012 when the user named “Samling Ryong” uploaded a video called “Ostrich tutorial”. In the video Samling Ryong shows how to make and preform the now called “Ostrich Dance/Sweatshirt Monsters”.

    Spread:
    Since then the trend has gone on to inspire imitators on Youtube and had been shared on tumblr through gifs and videos. but it didn’t take off in popularity till the trend stared appearing on the Vine.

    Notable Examples:




    Search Interest:

    External References:
    fn1. [1] Bestoftvineapp – http://www.bestofvineapp.com/vine/ostrich-dance-170901143077174×10151685524408876
    fn1. [2] Yahoo – http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20131005184612AABFBqp
    fn1. [3] Aol – http://on.aol.com/video/ostrich-dance-fail-517961973
    fn1. [4] Youtube – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xlPeK8jqQ8U
    fn1. [5] Youtube – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56c7o-g76yU
    fn1. [6] Tumblr – http://mrblue91.tumblr.com/post/62394174515/xochiii-vinesnow-ostrich-dance-source
    fn1. [7] Youtube – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DprCJ1DCDsU


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  • 11/18/13--11:29: Batkid
  • Overview

    Batkid is the nickname given to Miles Scott, a child cancer patient who ventured across the city of San Francisco dressed as Batman as part of an event orchestrated by the Make-A-Wish Foundation in November of 2013.

    Background

    On November 15th, 2013, the Make-A-Wish Foundation produced an event for Miles Scott, a 5-year-old cancer patient who has been battling leukemia, in San Francisco, California, by transforming parts of the city into the fictional Gotham and re-enacting memorable scenes from the Batman franchise with fictional villains Riddler and Penguin in various locations. According to the foundation, the event drew about 13,000 people to cheer him on along the way. That same day, San Francisco Chronicle uploaded a video footage of the event to Vimeo (shown below),[14] where it received more than 367,000 views and 3,000 likes in less than 72 hours.



    Notable Developments

    Online Reactions

    Throughout the day, several posts highlighting the BatKid surfaced on the front page of Reddit, further boosting the online news coverage of the Make-A-Wish event (shown below).[1][2][3][4]



    Meanwhile, other Redditors reacted to the event with image macro commentaries and GIFs, including an Insanity Wolf instance joking that Scott’s parents must be killed for him to become the true Batman in canon (shown below, left) an Everyone Loses Their Minds example scolding Redditors for moving on so quickly from the sufferings in the Philippines in the wake of the 2013 Typhoon Haiyan (shown below, middle) and a reactionGIF of an animated Batman crying (shown below, right).[5][6][17]



    On November 16th, The White House posted its first Vine clip[15] featuring a congratulatory message from President Barack Obama to BatKid for “saving the Gotham.”



    Batman Actor Reactions

    Also on November 16th, English actor Christian Bale, who portrayed Batman in the films Batman Begins (2005), The Dark Knight (2008) and The Dark Knight Rises (2012), praised Scott in an interview with the tech news site Vulture.[16]

    “This little kid, oh my God -- what a wonderful day for the little fella! It’s just fantastic, seeing all those people who were out there to support it.”

    In addition, other Batman actors applauded Scott and the foundation on Twitter, including Adam West from the 1960s Batman live action television series and Ben Affleck, who was recently cast in a Superman-Batman crossover film set for release in 2015.




    New Media Coverage

    In the coming days, several news sites published articles about the Make-A-Wish event, including The Guardian,[7]NPR,[8] E! Online,[9]CNN,[10] The Daily Mail,[11] NY Daily News[12] and The Huffington Post.[13]

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/18/13--14:23: The Hidden Staircase
  • Overview

    The Hidden Staircase refers to a secret cubbyhole discovered by Imgur user TwoBiteBrown behind a bookcase in his parents’ bedroom in November 2013. Upon its introduction to Imgur, the story was met with both surprise and skepticism on Reddit, in a similar vein to the reception of Redditor dont_stop_me_smee’s alleged discovery of a mystery vault.

    Background

    On November 13th, 2013, Imgur[1] user TwoBiteBrownie posted an image gallery containing several photographs of a secret staircase discovered behind a bookshelf (shown below). The photos were accompanied by a detailed description of the nook and objects found within, along with the author’s own suspicion that someone had come into his room and stolen some of his Halloween candy. In the first five days, the gallery gained 1.15 million views and 2,700 comments.




    “You would find this. Someone was living in our walls. IN OURWALLS. That is my Halloween candy. That someone came into my room, took from my bag, and then brought back in here. Banana peel for scale. About 30 seconds after taking this picture, we realized what it meant and got the fuck out of there.”

    Notable Developments

    On the same day, Redditor Bagrant1 submitted the gallery to the /r/WTF[1] subreddit, where it received more than 48,000 up votes and 4,700 comments in the next five days. In the comments section Redditor owitbyrnes posted a Most Interesting Man in the World image macro, which joked about the use of a banana peel for scale perspective in the photo gallery (shown below). On the following day, Redditor Sanderat submitted the gallery to the /r/creepy[3] subreddit, where it garnered upwards of 2,800 up votes and 210 comments in the following four days.



    Update

    On November 14th, TwoBitesBrownie submitted a follow-up post to Imgur[4] in which he revealed that his family promptly moved out of the house shortly after the initial discovery and would not be returning to the house, although the police speculated that the person had only been living there temporarily based on the available evidence.

    “So a lot of people wanted me to do a follow up on what happened. Here it is, but I don’t really have anything to put pictures of. I just put this one in for proof. Anyways, here’s what happened. I left to go to a friends house, while the police investigated my house. They found nobody there.”


    They have told us that the person was only living there temporarily, which doesn’t make that much sense to me. But apparently, he would come in for periods of time, then leave for a while. They determined this because of the lack of supplies, and forensicy thingies, i’m not a cop. The police also said that they are going to keep a city wide search for whoever was living here, although they don’t think they will find him. They sent in DNA to the lab, but the test will likely come back with no matches in a few weeks.There were no other entrances to the secret passage, therefore the person would have been using my parents’ bedroom to access it. The walls are incredibly soundproof, which is probably how we didn’t even notice. We were cleared to move back in today, but obviously we’re not staying, just as a precaution in case he or she comes back. My parents said that I was never allowed back in there again, and believe me, I tried. They actually went inside and boarded the whole place up. The police took all his stuff away, so I can’t include any pictures of that.

    Below, I’m going to include some answers to questions people asked, because obviously, there is a lot of skepticism towards this. I would be skeptical too.

    Q: Where are his other belongings?
    A: He or she was only living there periodically, apparently. Their clothes were placed in the corner, which I failed to see in the dark. The police found them later.

    Q: Why does that banana look fresh?
    A: I was eating it when I went down. lol. It was dark, and the only way I could see was through a dim light from my phone. We couldn’t find a flashlight. We saw the blankets, but it was too dark to see what they were. I tossed the banana at them, and then when nothing happened, I took a picture with the flash to see what it was. When editing, I remembered it could be for scale.

    Q: How did you not notice it, or see it in the blueprints?
    A: Yeah, I can’t really explain that one. I asked my mom, and she said, “I guess we fucked up.” I honestly can’t really explain it.. Um, and as for how we didn’t notice it, I guess it was really cleverly hidden under the stairs.

    Q: You write like you are 25, but have halloween candy?
    A: I’m 15. And apparently a good writer.

    Q: Are you okay?
    A: Yes, I am perfectly fine, just a little creeped out. :)

    Q: Where did the poo go?
    A: I don’t want to think about it

    You know how reddit does those Ask Me Anythings? I’ll do one in the comments for any further questions


    News Media Coverage

    In the coming days, several news sites reported about the Imgur photo gallery, including the Belfast Telegraph,[5] Metro,[6] Gizmodo,[7] Yahoo,[8] The Blaze[9] and The Daily Dot.[10]

    External References


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  • 11/18/13--17:12: FCK H8
  • About

    FCK H8 is an online store/activist group promoting tolerance of the LGBTQ+ community. The group has garnered attention for its celebrity endorsements, as well as criticism for exploiting the movement for money, blatant pandering to young adults, and misinterpreting the purpose of tolerance.

    Origin

    (researching)

    Spread

    The “fck h8” tag is on fire right now on Tumblr, mostly consisting of ironic posters created using the site’s poster maker. THAT’S RIGHTTUMBLR IS MAKINGFUN OF THISWEBSITE THAT’S WHENYOUKNOW YOU’VE GONETOOFAR

    WORK IN PROGRESS
    I WOULDGIVEYOUGUYS A BETTERPRODUCTBUTHOMEWORK


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  • 11/19/13--13:40: Coffee Maker Cooking
  • About

    Coffee Maker Cooking refers to the culinary practice of preparing a variety of food dishes using a coffee maker in substitute for a traditional stove.

    Origin

    On September 13th, 2005, ramen noodle blog The Official Ramen Homepage[1]published instructions on how to cook noodles in a coffee pot.

    Not a recipe, but an interesting way to cook your noodles…

    Take one package of Ramen Noodles and place inside coffee pot. Then you fill your coffee maker with water. Turn coffee pot on and allow it to cook its self. Let set for about 10 minutes so the noodles cook…. then drain noodles into a bowl. Add the flavoring of your package and any other seasonings you may like. Then eat.

    Spread

    On January 15th, 2007, CHOW Forums[2] user grocerytrkker submitted a post requesting coffee maker cooking recipes, which received over 70 replies in the first eight months. On February 19th, 2008, the parenting blog Parent Hacks[4] published a how-to guide to making oats with a coffee maker. On July 31st, YouTuber BobCob0 uploaded an instructional video for making ramen noodle soup in a coffee maker (shown below).



    On May 27th, 2009, the Swedish coffee maker cooking blog Kaffekokarkokboken[7] was created. On February 4th, 2011, a Facebook[5] page titled “Cooking With Your Coffee Maker” was launched. On July 23rd, 2012, Redditor RossPeterson submitted instructions for cooking ramen in a coffee maker to the /r/LifeProTips[10] subreddit. On September 9th, 2013, the CHOW YouTuber channel uploaded a video demonstrating how to cook breakfast in a coffee maker (shown below, left). On October 8th, CHOW uploaded another coffee maker cooking tutorial, featuring instructions on making salmon and rice in a coffee maker (shown below, right). On November 18th, several news sites published articles about cooking with coffee makers, including UpRoxx,[3]NPR[6] and BoingBoing.[8]



    Search Interest

    External References


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