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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 05/02/13--19:23: Top Gun
  • About

    Top Gun is the printed text on a cap worn by the character Adam DeMamp, played by Adam Devine,[2] in an episode of the television sitcom Workaholics.[1] On the internet, Devine’s expression has gained common usage as a reaction image, where the cap itself has been featured as an exploitable in various Photoshops.

    Origin

    Adam DeMamp wears the specific cap in the second season episode “Stop! Pajama Time”, which first aired on October 25th, 2011. Early on in the episode, DeMamp states he got the hat for being “the top sales gun of the month”, while it was actually just bought in a store. The hat got referenced throughout the episode various times and was also mentioned on the official Workaholics Tumblr earlier that day.[4]



    Spread

    On March 12th, 2012, FunnyJunk user joeylopezis made reply to a screencapped 4chan thread uploaded to the site, containing a reaction image of the specific facial expression of DeMamp.[3]

    [Researching]

    Search Interest


    External References

    [1]Wikipedia – Workaholics

    [2]Wikipedia – Adam Devine

    [3]FunnyJunk – joeylopezis

    [4]Tumblr – Workaholics


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  • 05/03/13--03:20: Next time, Mister Fox !
  • Swedish guy (Regular Ordinary Swedish Meal Time) is being threatened by his friend, Mister Fox.


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  • 05/03/13--10:34: Mad Karma with Jim Cramer
  • About

    Mad Karma with Jim Cramer is an advice animal image macro series featuring a photoshopped image of Jim Cramer, former hedge fund manager and the host of the MSNBC business news program Mad Money. On Reddit, the character is often used as an indicator of an up-and-coming meme or a trending discussion topic, similar to the use of Imminent Ned and The Rent is Too Damn High.

    Origin

    On June 11th, 2012, Redditor HomeButton submitted a post titled “Mad Karma with Jim Cramer” to the /r/AdviceAnimals[1] subreddit, which featured a screenshot of Cramer hosting Mad Money with the headline news ticker edited to list trending memes on Reddit instead of stock quotes. The image macro was captioned with “Dump all your karma in pictures of feet” (shown below), referencing a foot photograph post that had reached the front page the day before.[2] Prior to being archived, the post received over 4,300 up votes and 100 comments.



    Spread

    On June 12th, 2012, Redditor I_am_not_a_black_guy posted an image macro to the /r/AdviceAnimals[3] subreddit announcing that the Overly Attached Girlfriend meme had reached peak popularity (shown below, left). Before the post was archived, it accumulated more than 7,000 up votes and 130 comments. On June 21st, Redditor khdutton submitted an image macro to /r/AdviceAnimals[4] calling attention to the rise of the Confession Bear advice animal series (shown below, right), which gained upwards of 4,100 up votes and 80 comments prior to being archived.



    On September 30th, Redditor pkfc9 posted an image macro to the /r/AdviceAnimals[6] subreddit calling attention to the popularity of baked goods with decorations inspired by the television drama series Dexter (shown below, left). The post was archived with over 6,000 up votes and 60 comments. On April 20th, 2013, Redditor skyrimnerd submitted an image macro to /r/AdviceAnimals[7] which referenced the popularity of posts praising the Boston police department in the aftermath of the 2013 Boston marathon bombings (shown below, right). Within the next two weeks, the post garnered more than 1,200 up votes.



    Notable Examples

    As of early May 2013, the “Mad Karma with Jim Cramer” Quickmeme[5] page has received over 9,000 submissions.



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 05/03/13--11:50: #FollowATeen


  • About

    #FollowATeen is a Twitter hashtag associated with a practical joke that involves following a random teenager on the microblogging site and covertly tweeting about his or her daily updates.

    Origin

    #FollowATeen[18] was first proposed by Something Awful writer David Thorpe via Twitter in late December 2011, who suggested that adults on Twitter should follow teenagers to get a perspective on modern teen life.




    Spread

    On April 12th, 2013, Thorpe brought back the hashtag at the request of Buzzfeed staff members Katie Notopoulos, encouraging people to use the hashtag to report on the teen’s life.[1] Later that day, Notopoulos posted an article about the experiment to Buzzfeed[2], instructing the participants to avoid interactions with their teenage subjects and if the latter followed them back, they had to find a new one. The article also suggested several twitter searches that would yield the accounts of teenagers including “i hate high school”[3] and “i’m just 16 but.”[4] As of May 2013, #followateen has been used on Twitter nearly 800 times.[5]



    That same day, the hashtag was featured in an article published by the Toronto Standard, followed by a mention in a Popular Science[7] article about Twitter Music published later that month. Many Twitter users considered the practice creepy, a sentiment echoed by The New Inquiry[8] on May 1st in an article noting that the social internet is often determined by the way teenagers use it. On May 2nd, Notopoulos posted a follow-up article on Buzzfeed[9], highlighting dozens of tweets from the resurgence of #FollowATeen.

    Notable Examples





    #FollowAnAdult

    Following a discussion amongst teen culture blog Rookie[10] editors in which they realized adult tweets were just as prosaic as the tweets #FollowATeen participants were making fun of, writer Hazel Cills was the first person to use the #FollowAnAdult[11] hashtag on May 2nd, 2013, poking fun at people who work in media and dislike New York City. On May 3rd, Rookie’s official Twitter account encouraged teens to use the hashtag, following an adult and tweeting about their seemingly mundane activities. In approximately 24 hours, the hashtag had been used more than 500 times.[12] That day, the hashtag was discussed on The Atlantic[13], Gawker[14], Jezebel[15] and the Daily Dot.[16] Buzzfeed[17] posted a response piece as well, noting that #FollowATeen was created as a self-deprecating way to point out how much adults no longer understand teenage culture.




    Twitter Feeds



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 05/03/13--12:36: Scribblenauts
  • About

    Scribblenauts is a side-scrolling puzzle action video game series developed by 5th Cell exclusively for the Nintendo DS and published by Warner Bros Interactive Entertainment. In the game, the player must collect, assemble and utilize various objects along the way to complete each level.

    History

    The first Scribblenauts game was developed by 5th Cell and published by Warner Brothers Games for the Nintendo DS handheld game console September 15th, 2009. On October 12th, 2010, the sequel Super Scribblenauts was released, which allowed the player to use adjectives to spawn objects. On June 5th, 2012, Scribblenauts Unlimited was published with additional gameplay elements including an open world, sex-specific objects and the ability to spawn up to 60 objects at a time.

    Gameplay

    The player must solve puzzles by moving the character Maxwell in a 2-dimensional side-scrolling environment to collect an object known as a “Starite” in each level. To do so, a wide variety of objects can be summoned by inputting words into an in-game notepad, including animals, weapons, natural forces, celebrities, monsters, household items, vehicles and Internet meme characters. There are over 22,802 words in the original Scribblenauts game,[15] 33,000 in Super Scribblenauts[16] and an unlimited amount in Scribblenauts Unlimited due to the game’s custom object generator.



    Online Presence

    Anticipation

    The high level of anticipation surrounding the game led to the launch of several fan sites and communities during the weeks leading up to its official release. On June 7th, 2009, the Scribblenauts Wiki[11] was launched, where over 4,300 pages were added in the following four years. On June 12th, a Facebook[12] page titled “Scribblenauts” was created, garnering more than 182,000 likes in the same time frame. On July 1st, the /r/scribblenauts[13] subreddit was made, where Redditors submit posts related to the then-upcoming title.

    Scribblenauts Unlimited

    Following the release of Scribblenauts Unlimited on November 13th, 2012, the Gawker Media video game blog Kotaku[14] published an article to highlight user-generated objects created within the Scribblenauts game (shown below).



    On December 1st, 2012, YouTuber OceanityVDO uploaded a video titled “Scribblenauts is really offensive,” in which a black non-player character is seen running after a piece of fried chicken hanging from a pole attached to his own head. (shown below). Within the next five months, the video received over 115,000 views and 190 comments. On December 13th, the video was submitted to the /r/gaming[9] subreddit, where it accumulated upwards of 2,800 up votes and 240 comments in four months.



    On December 27th, Redditor acma submitted several Scribblenauts Unlimited screenshots to the /r/gaming[8] subreddit, which showed a character riding down a ski slope by sitting on a ski pole (shown below, left). In the first four months, the post gained more than 8,800 up votes and 300 comments. On April 29th, 2013, Redditor Sheph3rd posted a video game logic image macro to the /r/gaming[10] subreddit, which mocked the developer’s decision to keep alcohol out of the game while allowing the player to murder children (shown below, right). Within four days, the post received over 1,800 up votes and 80 comments.



    Highlights

    Post 217

    Post 217 refers to a post by NeoGAF[2] forum member Feep submitted on June 5th, 2009, which detailed his experience playing a preview version of Scribblenauts at the Electronic Entertainment Expo. He recounted spawning a time machine which brought his character to a land of mountable dinosaurs which he proceeded to use to kill robot zombies. In the original Nintendo DS release of the game, typing “two one seven” spawns a large picture of Maxwell riding a Tyrannosaurus rex toward a zombie, which can explode all objects on the entire map (shown below).



    Meme References

    In the original Nintendo DS game, many Internet memes could be summoned by the player (shown below, left), including Longcat, Tacgnol, Cthulhu. Keyboard Cat, Ceiling Cat, Rick Astley, Giant Enemy Crab, Spaghetti Cat, the NeoGAF logo, Monorail Cat, Basement Cat, the Over 9000 scouter, Dramatic Prairie Dog, Weegee, Lollerskates, ROFLcopter, ORLY Owl, Leeroy Jenkins and Loituma Girl. In Scribblenauts Unlimited, both Nyan Cat (shown below, right) and the Wacky Waving Inflatable Arm Waving Tube Man were added as summonable objects.



    Reception

    Lawsuit

    On April 22nd, 2013, the creators of both Nyan Cat (Chirs Torres) and Keyboard Cat (Charles Schmidt) filed a lawsuit[7] against Warner Brothers and 5th Cell for infringing their copyrights and trademarks by using the meme characters in Scribblenauts games without their permission. On May 2nd, the tech news blog The Verge[1] published an article reporting on the legal complaint, noting that both plaintiffs are represented by manager Ben Lashes, who had previously been quoted comparing Disney’s enforcement of trademark to his defense of memes:

    Ben Lashes: “If it’s not something you can do to Mickey Mouse then it’s not something you can do to Keyboard Playing Cat, or Nyan Cat, or anybody that I represent.”

    In the coming days, the lawsuit was subsequently reported on by several other news sites, including Wired,[3] Ars Technica,[4] Joystiq[5] and the BBC.[6]

    Notable Videos



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 05/04/13--14:08: Third Reich Deviantartwork
  • HTML Online Editor Sample

    A popular meme in Deviantart is to draw pictures of personalities related to the Third German Reich.

    Origin

    The origin is unknown. We need to research it a bit more.

    Examples

    3 Dimensional Sculptures

    A Deviantart artist by the name of WolfandMoon has made 3D sculptures of historical figures in the Third Reich.

    Dr. Josef Mengele Fanclub

    Several Deviantart artists have formed a group over drawing Josef Mengele.

    Popularity

    Deviantart Groups pertaining to this meme

    http://dr-josef-mengele.deviantart.com/

    http://reichlove.deviantart.com/

    http://third-reich-satire.deviantart.com/


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    About

    Cowboy Bebop Opening Parodies, refers to a series of series of parodies revolving around the anime Cowboy Bebop’s opening song, “Tank!”. The song has inspired many parodies on Youtube, pairing it with different anime among other things.

    Origin

    Cowboy Bebop[1], is a Sci-Fi Action anime created by Sunrise[2]. It detailed the lives of four bounty hunters, Spike Spiegel, Jet Black, Faye Valentine and Edward, as well as their pet Corgi Ein. Throughout the series, each of the character’s dark pasts are slowly revealed, leading the characters to confront these problems. The series’ soundtrack was composed by the band Seatbelts[3], a group who was brought together to perform the entire soundtrack. The opening theme song, Tank![4], is an instrumental piece with only one line of vocals. The song grew immense popularity, becoming a famous song among anime.

    Spread

    One of the first major notable parodies, titled Cosby Bebop[5], was first submitted to YTMND on 11 May 2006, and later submitted to Youtube on June 5 2010. The video showed the song being sung by popular American Comedian Bill Cosby. The video grew in popularity, reaching over 1 million views on YTMND, and over 170,000 views on Youtube.

    Notable Parodies

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Wikipedia – Cowboy Bebop

    [2]Wikipedia – Sunrise

    fn3, Wikipedia – Seatbelts

    [4]Wikipedia – Music of Cowboy Bebop

    [5]YTMNDCosby Bebop


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  • 05/05/13--05:43: Saraapril/Rages/and/Riots
  • A blogger in a site called “Club Penguin”, get’s more hate than attention.
    A first look at Saraapril, uses smiley faces to much in her blogs which causes people to react in a troll like way, with also the fact that she is described as a young child not getting her own way all the time.
    She has a superior hatred for “Spike Hike”(A.K.A) New founder, and blames nearly everything on this guy for multiple reasons, still having Disney “ruined club penguin” on her other shoulder.
    Still, Saraapril is actually quite good at blogging, she needs to learn how to not go over the top in some cases.
    Trolls, a lot of people troll Saraapril on twitter for her puny attitude towards people, many people make parody accounts and screenshots of her penguin, while putting a caption about her in the center this was a way people pissed her off and got there own back on this blogger.

    She mainly only likes people that agree with her, and blocks anyone on twitter with a different opinion.
    She complains about every little thing in this virtual game with makes her a target for trolls/cyberbullys/ and just using her as a plain example of “Bad”


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  • 05/05/13--17:08: Cute Mario Bros.
  • Cute Mario Brothers is fan series that is on MarioMario8989 account. Its first episode was called Cute Mario Bros- Find Yoshi also knowed as a parody of Mama Luigi on Super Mario World (TV Series)

    needs to be edit.


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    Why would you do it to me,is a prank video of a guy playing Scary Maze Game and then as the white face appears he punches right through the screen and then screams “Why Would You Do It To Me!” The video was then sent to Saturday Night Live and then a youtube user CoCaCoOoOola posted the video on youtube. The video has spawned many images.


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    [WIP]

    About

    “Beating a dead horse”(a.k.a “flogging or punching a dead horse”) is an internet slang term often found in comments, discussion forums and image macros used for mocking unnecessary arguments, pointless discussions or acts.

    Origin

    According to the Wikipedia[1] the first recorded use of the expression with its modern meaning is by British politician and orator John Bright, referring to the Reform Act of 1867, which called for more democratic representation in Parliament, an issue about which Parliament was singularly apathetic. Trying to rouse Parliament from its apathy on the issue, he said in a speech, would be like trying to flog a dead horse to make it pull a load. The Oxford English Dictionary cites The Globe, 1872, as the earliest verifiable use of flogging a dead horse, where someone is said to have “rehearsed that […] lively operation known as flogging a dead horse”.

    From Urban Dictionary[2]:

    It doesn’t matter how much you want to continue riding beating a dead horse is not going to get you anywhere.

    If something is already done and over with there is no point in still talking about it.

    If something is already broken there is no point in trying to use it.

    External References

    [1]Wikipedia – Flogging A Dead Horse

    [2]Urban Dictionary – Beating A Dead Horse


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  • 05/06/13--12:21: You Dense Motherfucker
  • About

    You Dense Motherfucker is an expression used to insult someone’s intelligence or decision making ability. The phrase is most often iterated in the form of a reaction image based on a panel from KC Green’s webcomic series The Anime Club or alternatively, a screen capture of the villain character Syndrome from the 2005 Pixar short animation film Jack-Jack Attack.

    Origin

    On July 15th, 2009, K.C. Green released the eighth issue of his webcomic series The Anime Club,[1] which featured a panel showing the character Mark calling his friend Mort a “dense motherfucker” for purchasing an infected anime DVD (shown below).



    Spread

    On July 15th, 2010, a 4chan user replied to another poster’s praising of High School of the Dead as a “god tier animation” in a thread on /a/ (Anime & Manga) board[3] with the illustrated panel from The Anime Club (shown below).



    On February 24th, 2011, Tumblr[4] user claudiaruckus posted the two-pane webcomic illustration. On March 25th, Redditor internetor submitted the same panel to the /r/pics[2] subreddit, presenting the quote as his internal monologue while interacting with
    “stupid people.” On September 9th, 2012, RedditorRED-fucking-rocket posted a reaction image[5] featuring the villain character Syndrome from the 2005 CGI-animated short film Jack-Jack Attack as a commentary on those who resume relationships with former partners who have cheated on them (shown below).



    On April 3rd, 2013, FunnyJunk[6] user escott submitted a screenshot of a Facebook argument wherein the original poster mistakenly asks friends to “call or text” if they find his lost cell phone, only to correct himself later by responding to his own post with the reaction image of Syndrome. Within one month, the post accumulated upwards of 77,000 views and 2,200 up votes.



    On April 6th, a Facebook[7] page titled “You Dense Motherfucker” was launched, receiving over 250 likes in the first month. On April 28th, YouTuber HoboWITHGuns uploaded a gameplay video titled “You Dense Motherfucker” for the flash game “Give Up”[8] (shown below).



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 05/06/13--17:48: magnet
  • About

    magnet (No capitalized M) is a Vocaloid song that was originally sung by the Vocaloids Hatsune Miku and Megurine Luka. The song is often accompanied by a picture of the singers wearing butterfly headphones while nearly kissing or embracing. The song itself is about a couple who feels that their love is a sin and are worried about their future. Since the original pairing, Miku/Luka, is a same-sex pairing, one can interpret the song as being about prejudices against homosexuality.

    Accompanying Art

    In most “magnet” videos, an accompanying picture is shown, with the singers looking into each other’s eyes or embracing in some other way. They are almost always wearing headphones with butterfly wings on them. The color of the wings varies, depending on the singer’s “color”. (More common with Vocaloids, who have a set color scheme eg. Luka is pink Gakupo is purple Kaito is blue) A singer would wear headphones the color of their partner.

    The “uke” or “bottom” in the pairing is often indicated as the one wearing a small top hat, while the “seme” or “top” is hatless. Sometimes, but less commonly, only the seme has headphones with a strap going over their head, while the uke appears to have headphones built into their heads. Rarely the headphones will not have butterfly wings, but will instead have feathered wings or bat wings.

    needs ALOT of work. I will come back and keep adding to this, so don’t deadpool it just yet!


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  • 05/07/13--07:50: Charles Ramsey's Interview
  • Overview

    Charles Ramsey is a Cleveland, Ohio resident who rose to internet fame in early May 2013 after assisting three women who had been missing for nearly a decade escape from their captor’s house. As the shocking story unravelled, Ramsey appeared in an interview segment for a local news report and gave a colorful account of how it all happened. Following the YouTube upload of the interview clip, Ramsey instantly became hailed as a hero on the web.

    Background

    On May 6th, 2013, Amanda Berry, Georgina DeJesus, and Michele Knight, three women who had been missing for a decade, were found alive in a residential area south of downtown Cleveland, Ohio. According to the news reports, the women were able to escape from their captor’s house with the assistance of Charles Ramsey, a neighbor who promptly responded to Amanda Berry’s call for help and set them free by kicking a hole in the locked door. Later that same day, Ramsey appeared in a news interview with ABC affiliate NewsNet5 and provided a colorful witness account.



    Notable Developments

    On Reddit

    During the early hours of May 7th, several news articles, image macros and discussions related to the story were featured on the front page of Reddit[2], with many readers fixating on Ramsey’s role in the rescue and his memorable quotes from the news interview clip. By 6 p.m. (ET), more than 130 posts[3] about Charles Ramsey had been submitted to the site, including quite a few image macros praising him as a hero dubbed “Good Guy Charles Ramsey.”[4]



    On Twitter

    Around the same time, American stand-up comedian Patton Oswalt posted a tweet conveying his admiration for Ramsey. Within 14 hours, the tweet received over 2,200 retweets and 1,100 favorites.




    According to the Twitter analytics site Topsy,[5] tweets mentioning “charles ramsey” peaked on May 7th at 9:49 a.m. ET (shown below). Throughout the day, the keywords “Charles Ramsey” were listed as a worldwide trending topic on the microblogging and social networking site.



    At 11:11 a.m. (ET), the viral content site BuzzFeed[6] posted a compilation of notable tweets referencing Ramsey, many of which included image macros joking about the video (shown below, left) and Totally Looks Like photos comparing Ramsey to the villain Sho’nuff from 1985 martial arts film The Last Dragon (shown below, right).



    At 2:40 p.m. (ET), the official McDonald’s Corporation Twitter feed congratulated Ramsey for his bravery and said they would “be in touch.”




    External References


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  • 05/07/13--15:56: OpUSA
  • Overview

    *OpUSA*is an Anonymous hacktivist campaign against various American government and banking websites carried out by hackers previously involved in Operation Israel.

    Background

    On April 11th, 2013, the hacking news blog CyberWarZone[6] reported that “Mauritania Attacker,” one of the organizers behind Operation Israel, is planning a similar campaign to infiltrate American websites and servers in retaliation for the deaths of innocents in Iraq, Afghanistan, Gaza and Pakistan, citing a Pastebin[7] file dubbed “OpUSA” which suggested that the attack will take place on May 7th, 2013.



    Notable Developments

    On April 14th, Tunisian Anonymous collaborators uploaded a YouTube video titled “#OPusa 7/5/2013,” featuring a speech by a United States soldier criticizing the Israeli occupation of Palestine (shown below, left). On April 21st, another Pastebin[4] document was released by the Anonymous-affiliated group “N4m3le55 cr3w,”[5] which warned United States President Barack Obama and American citizens of the impending OpUSA attacks. On April 22nd, YouTuber kiluminati544 uploaded a video titled “#OpUSA Anonymous hackers send message to Obama” (shown below, right), incorporating the N4m3le55 cr3w’s statement in text-to-speech voiceover.



    On April 24th, a Pastebin[3] page was created containing a target list of United States government and banking websites to be attacked during OpUSA. On May 2nd, the hacking blog Illsecure[11] announced that 10,000 credit cards belonging to American sites had been leaked by the OpUSA hacker group “AnonGhost.” On the same day, the security blog Krebs Security[12] posted about a leaked confidential alert by the United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS), which warned that the OpUSA attacks would likely “result in limited disruptions and mostly consist of nuisance-level attacks.” On May 6th, The Huffington Post[8] published an article about the impending OpUSA attacks, noting that many previous operations had been considered failures.

    D-Day

    On May 7th, the website Hacker News Bulletin[9] posted a list of websites and email accounts that had been compromised by OpUSA hacktivists. The same day, the website BankInfoSecurity[10] published an article reporting that no federal government websites had been compromised or threatened during the course of the day, adding that the the Izz ad-Din al-Qassam Cyber Fighters’ refusal to join the operation likely defused the attack. The article also quoted University of Alabama at Birmingham researcher Gary Warner, who noted several lackluster successes in the operation:

    Gary Warner: “[They’ve] had a couple moderately interesting successes, such as adding a host to Microsoft’s Republic of the Congo domain name and the very short-lived defacement of a small bank in Arkansas. The group also appears to have mistakenly targeted a blood-bank site, which a non-English-speaking hacker apparently thought was Bank of America.”

    Also on May 7th, The Daily Dot[13] published an article listing several small websites compromised by OpUSA hackers, including an “out-of-commission parenting site,” and online bakery and a German real-estate site.

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 05/08/13--04:43: Girls und Panzer
  • Girls und Panzer (ガールズ&パンツァー Gāruzu ando Pantsā?) is a 2012 Japanese anime television series created by Actas. The animation is directed by Tsutomu Mizushima and produced by Kiyoshi Sugiyama. Takaaki Suzuki, who has earlier acted as a military history advisor for Strike Witches and Upotte, has revealed that he is involved in the production of the anime. The series initially aired in Japan between October and December 2012, with two additional episodes airing in March 2013 and an original video animation in production. A manga series by Ryūichi Saitaniya launched in Media Factory’s Comic Flapper magazine from June 5, 2012. A 2014 film has been announced.

    The story focuses on the art of Sensha-dō, (Way of the Tank) in which girls take part in battles using World War 2 battle tanks.


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  • 05/08/13--11:04: Densha Otoko / Train Man
  • Work in Progress.

    About

    Densha Otoko, sometimes called Train Man in English-speaking countries, is a book, manga, film, and television franchise that grew out of a famous thread on the Japanese imageboard 2Chan in 2004.

    External Links

    TvTropes – Densha Otoko
    TvTropes – Getsumen To Heiki Mina (a spinoff from the TV drama)


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  • 05/08/13--11:42: Exploding Knees
  • About

    Exploding Knees is a photoshopped advertisement which depicts a young boy playing with a wireless Nintendo joystick and explosions erupting from his knee caps.

    Origin

    According to the tech news blog Geekosystem,[4] a Nintendo apparel ad was run by the company Homer’s in 1994, featuring a young boy wearing a Super Mario hat and a Nintendo sweater while playing with a wireless joystick (shown below, left). On August 9th, 2007, a photoshopped version of the Nintendo advertisement was posted to a thread in the /b/ (random board) on 4chan,[9] which included explosions superimposed over the child’s knees with the caption “Exploding Knees” (shown below, right).



    Spread

    On January 24th, 2010, YouTuber xXUltraSushiXx uploaded a video featuring the exploding knees image macro, accompanied by a looped audio file of a text-to-speech voice narrating “Maik is pro in Sonic games, but just because he’s gay” for 10 minutes (shown below).



    On August 4th, 2011, DeviantArtist[2] Valenmere uploaded an illustration titled “Exploding Knees,” featuring several renditions of the Nintendo ad (shown below, left). On September 5th, a Facebook[10] page titled “Help Raise Awareness of Exploding Knee’s Syndrome” was launched. On November 30th, a T-shirt with the Exploding Knees image macro printed on the front was put up for sale on the online retailer Red Bubble[3] (shown below, middle). On December 5th, Canvas[7] user darkexecutor posted a photoshopped image of professional golfer Tiger Woods with exploding knees (shown below, right).



    On April 6th, 2012, the Internet news blog Unreality Mag[5] highlighted the original 1994 ad, which was subsequently reblogged by the tech news sites Geekosystem[4] and Geeks Are Sexy[6] within the next week. On October 1st, an anonymous 4chan[8] user mentioned exploding knees while listing several of the imageboard’s older memes.



    Notable Examples




    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 05/08/13--12:45: Aww Pickles
  • “Aww Pickles” was one of many kinds of meme’s that we have to thank celebrities for, especially Gerard and Micheal “Mikey” Way.

    In 2012, Micheal Way posted a picture in the popular image website ,Instagram, of him and Sarah Cantergiani. Micheal Way’s current wife, at the time, was Alica Simmon. When Alica heard of this, she divorced Micheal, and many people heard about the affair and divorce, such Micheal’s brother, Gerard Way. When Gerard heard of the affair, he posted a twitter status update, only saying “Aww Pickles”. After much more people heard of the affair, a account on Tumblr, a popular blogging website creating the meme we now know as “Aww Pickles” by combining two things that agree perfectly.

    “Aww Pickles” is one of the most simplest meme’s out on the internet, but still creates laughs. All the meme is a poorly photoshoped face of Gerard Way onto a pickle with two stick-like arms. It sounds incredibly childish, but that’s what makes it funny. The meme represents success or a want for something.

    “Aww Pickles” may look like it was thought of in 5 minutes by a 5 year-old child on a sugar rush, but that stupidity of it makes us all love it. Love it or hate it, you all have to agree, “Aww Pickles” will be here for many fans of Gerard and Micheal Way


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  • 05/08/13--13:50: Filthy Casual
  • About

    Filthy Casual” is a term used on message boards and in comments to negatively describe a gamer who only plays casual games[1], or a game in any genre that requires a low level of commitment and often has simple gameplay.

    Origin

    The term originated on 4chan’s /v/ (video games) board by hardcore gamers who view people who play casual games in a negative light. The first archived use of the term[2] was posted on August 30th, 2008 in a parody thread about how an average discussion plays out on the board.



    Spread

    By April 2009, the term had spread to other boards on 4chan, including /m/ (Mecha)[3], where a poster was called a filthy casual for admitting he or she enjoyed the anime Toradora!.[4] Throughout 2010, the phrase appeared on a handful of other boards including /a/[5] (anime & manga) and /tg/[6] (traditional gaming). Also that year, “filthy casuals” was used in commentary about people who play Facebook-based games on the Escapist forums[7] and on a Destructoid community member’s blog.[8] In December 2011, the first tagged image macro depicting a stereotypically nerdy looking male with a caption referencing flithy casuals was posted to Tumblr[9]



    On April 10th, 2012, Josué Pereira of the webcomic Nerf Now![11] posted a strip comparing the gaming habits of filthy casuals vs. self-proclaimed elite gamers (shown below). That same day, it was reposted to the /r/Gaming[10] subreddit, where it accrued 505 upvotes, 363 points overall and 72 comments before being archived. In late 2012, references to these types of gamers were made on the /r/Circlejerk[12] subreddit and World of Tanks gaming forum.[13] That November, the first Facebook fan page[14] dedicated to the phrase launched.



    On January 21st, 2013, a /r/FilthyCasuals[15] subreddit was created, but has only had one submission as of May 2013. A week later, a second Facebook[16] fan page was established. In early 2013, discussions and image macros about these types of gamers have appeared on Gamespot[17], We Know Memes[18], Tumblr[19] and FunnyJunk.[20]

    Search Interest



    External References


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