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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 01/28/18--19:51: Bup
  • Note: Editing under way. Please BUP with extreme caution.



    About

    Bup is a term commonly associated with the Super Mario 64 speedrunner Simpleflips, deriving from a stretched out texture of Toad’s face from the game. It is commonly used as a replacement for textures in romhacks of the game.

    Origin

    The first known use of the texture for a memetic purpose came with the creation of Super Releasio 64, a Super Mario 64 romhack by Kaze[2], which was released on September 12, 2016. The hack replaced many textures in the game with the texture of Toad’s face, as well as replacing all the instruments of the game’s soundtrack with various Toad voicelines.



    Spread

    The romhack quickly gained attention from Super Mario 64 speedrunners and streamers, specifically Twitch user Simpleflips. After streaming the romhack, the association between the phrase and the texture of Toad’s face quickly spread throughout his viewerbase, causing many users to make references to it in both future romhacks, as well as donations to him.



    Similarly, some viewers used the “bup” sound effect as a sample with which to make music, which they would then play on Simpleflips’ channel via a plugin that allows donators to request songs.


    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Twitch – Simpleflips

    [2]SM64Hacks – Super Releasio 64


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  • 01/29/18--07:23: 2018 Grammy Awards
  • Overview

    The 2018 Grammy Awards was an awards ceremony held by the Recording Academy to award the past year in the music industry. The festivities were held on January 28th, 2018 at Madison Square Garden in New York City, New York.

    Background

    The Grammys, originally known as the Gramophone awards, have been held annually since 1959.[1]

    On May 15th, 2017, late-night host James Corden was announced as the host of the 60th annual Grammy awards.[2] Several months later, on November 28th, 2017, the nominees were announced.[3]

    The awards were held on January 28th, 2018 at Madison Square Garden, generating several memes and viral moments during the ceremony’s live broadcast.

    Developments

    Beyoncé Onlooker Reaction

    That night, Twitter[4] account @WhoWhatWear published a photograph of recording artists Beyoncé and Jay passing by a woman with a stunned look on her face. They captioned the image “Relatable. #GRAMMYs.” The post (shown below) received more than 2,500 retweets and 9,500 likes in 24 hours.

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/29/18--08:42: Burger King Foot Lettuce
  • About

    Burger King Foot Lettuce refers to a scandal in which a Burger King employee was photographed standing in two plastic tubs of lettuce with shoes on. The image was posted to 4chan, and there users were able to quickly identify the location of the Burger King as Mayfield Heights, Ohio. They then sent the photo to local news sites, and the employee was quickly fired after the story made local and national news. A retelling of the story posted to YouTube in late 2017 became a copypasta as well as the the subject of video remixes and parodies because of the narrator’s nasal voice and bizarre cadence.

    Origin

    On July 16th, 2012, an anonymous 4chan user posted a picture of himself, a Burger King employee, standing in lettuce at the restaurant with the caption, “This is the lettuce you eat at Burger King.”



    Spread

    4chan users discovered the Exif data on the photo, which they used to surmise that the picture was taken in a Burger King on Mayfield Road in Ohio. They then began contacting local news outlets in Ohio as well as the manager of the restaurant. Clevescene[1] broke the story on July 17th, and upon showing the picture to the Mayfield Road Burger King manager, she said “Oh, I know who that is. He’s getting fired.” A compilation of comments from 4chan leading to the exposure was posted to Imgur[2] on July 17th (shown below). The story was covered by national news sites including Today,[3] Gawker,[4] and Daily Dot.[5]



    On November 11th, 2017, the story was recalled on the YouTube channel Top15s in a video called “Top 15 Mysteries Solved by 4Chan” (shown below). The video gained over 1.4 million views.



    The narration of the clip by a user named Chills caught the attention of other internet users. On November 19th, YouTuber ling isolated the introduction to the video where Chills begins to talk about “Burger King Foot Lettuce.” The clip gained over 15,000 views (shown below, left). YouTuber Samoyed did the same on January 24th, 2018, gaining over 23,000 views (shown below, right). After these videos were posted, additional remixes began appearing on YouTube. The text of the Top15s video was posted to /r/copypasta[6] on January 28th, 2018.



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/29/18--09:19: FishMoley
  • About

    FishMoley is a Twitch emote depicting a smooth lumpfish. This emote is only available for BetterTTV users. It is used primarily to denote disgust, unhappiness or anger.

    Origin

    The FishMoley Twitch emote originates from an image on Chicago Now’s ‘10 Ugliest Species of Fish: Ugly Week Continues’ list which depicts a smooth lumpfish which would soon be known as FishMoley.

    Spread

    The FishMoley BetterTTV emote quickly gained popularity after Twitter user ‘Duckkis 🦆 🇫🇮‏ ’ posted an image which depicts a Finnish Twitch chat where users ’CasualCassowary’ and ‘DuckSituation’ used the emote on 16th September, 2015.

    Reddit user ‘Vezzy47’ made a post on Reddit asking ‘can someone explain to me what is a Fish Moley??’. Reddit user named ‘BlanceBlackula’ replied by saying that is was a lumpfish and couldn’t confirm what it ‘meant/represented’.

    FishMoley later appeared on various different items including mugs and pillows.

    Image

    (Twitter user ‘Manny @Turban_INC711’)

    Search Interest

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  • 01/29/18--09:27: Shower Rat
  • About

    Shower Rat refers to a viral video in which a common rat appears to be taking a shower in the manner of a human being, standing upright and rubbing it’s body in a way that resembles the lathering process. While many online found the video cute and funny, others pointed out that it is possible the rat might have had an irritant on its body, which is why it was acting that way.

    Origin

    The video of the rat was shot by Jose Correa, who first uploaded the video to Facebook[1] on January 27th, 2018 on the account akasoteexcito. In the video, a common street rat appears to be standing upright and rubbing itself in a way that resembles the human showering process. The post (shown below) received more than 44 million views, one million shares, 200,000 reactions and 175,000 comments in 48 hours.


    Spread

    That day, Twitter[2] user offorasteiro tweeted the video with the caption, “eu to sóbrio de mais pra ta vendo um rato tomando banho.” The post received more than 1.78 million views, 41,000 retweets and 61,000 likes in 48 hours.



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/29/18--09:44: Elon Musk Flamethrower
  • Overview

    Elon Musk’s Flamethrower Sale refers to a $500 flamethrower sold by Elon Musk’s tunnel construction business The Boring Company, which placed the indendiart device up for sale on the company website in late January 2018 after successfully selling 50,000 hats.

    Background

    On December 10th, 2017, Musk tweeted that if The Boring Company sold over 50,000 hats, he would “start selling The Boring Company flamethrower” (shown below). Within two months, the tweet gathered upwards of 75,400 likes and 10,500 retweets.



    Developments

    On January 28th, Musk posted short video clip of Boring Company employees using the flamethrower (shown below). Within 24 hours, the video clip gathered upwards of 2.09 million views.


    Great for roasting nuts 🔥 🥜

    A post shared by Elon Musk (@elonmusk) on


    Online Reaction

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/29/18--10:23: Celeste
  • About

    Celeste is an indie platforming video game designed and published by Matt Makes Games released in January of 2018 on all major gaming platforms.

    History

    A prototype for Celeste was created by Noel Barry and Matt Thorson in 2016[1] in four days. The prototyped was designed for precision gameplay and speed runs. In the course of two years, the full game was developed by Thorson and Barry, written by Thorson, with artwork by Amora B. and Pedro Medeiros, and music by Lena Raine. A trailer for the game was posted on February 28th, 2017 (shown below). It was published on January 25th, 2018 for all major video game platforms, including all the major consoles, Windows, Mac, and Linux.



    In the game, the player plays as Madeleine, a climber attempting to climb the titular mountain. Along the way, she meets several other characters on the mountain. With limited mechanics--a jump, a dash, and a grab/climb button--Madeleine works through dozens of levels in an attempt to reach the top.

    Reception

    The game was very critically well received. The Nintendo Switch release has a score of 94/100 on Metacritic[2] with critics praising the game’s level design, gameplay, style, and emotional depth. IGN gave the game a perfect score in its video review of the game (shown below, left). In his generally sarcastic style, VideoGameDunkey also gave the game high praise in his review, which gained over 1.9 million views.



    Online Presence

    The game’s development was documented in a Tumblr page maintained by the creators.[3] The game has been highly praised in several Reddit threads, particularly in Switch-based communities. A thread posted to /r/NintendoSwitch[4] on the day of release called it a perfect game for the Switch’s portable mode. Another posted the 27th to the same subreddit highly praised the game and gained over 630 upvotes.[6] A subreddit[5] was also created for the game, though it has only 27 subscribers as of January 29th, 2018.

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/29/18--11:36: YouTube Acid Attack Prank
  • Overview

    YouTube Acid Attack refers to a controversy regarding a YouTube video featuring YouTuber ItsAyra throwing water in unsuspecting bystanders’ faces. The video has been perceived as taking advatage of the fear surrounding recent acid attacks in England. The vlogger in question, Arya Mosallah, has since taken the video down in light of the backlash.

    Background

    On June 6th, 2017, YouTuber[3] ItzArya published a video entitled “THROWINGWATER ON PEOPLESFACES.” In the video, vlogger Arya Mosallah throws water in the face of unsuspecting strangers. Additionally, Mosallah promises that if video gets 20,000 likes, he’ll release a second part. The video (since deleted) received more than 8.2 million views and 198,000 likes in eight months.

    On January 7th, 2018, YouTube vlogger ItzArya tweeted[1] a link to the sequel, “THROWINGWATER ON PEOPLESFACES PT.2.” The video has since been deleted, however, the tweet (shown below) received more than one retweet and nine likes. Yahoo News[2] reported that before being removed the video had received more than 1.6 million views.



    The video has since been deleted by YouTube. However, YouTuber The World as M & M has uploaded a mirror of the video (shown below).[16]



    Development

    On January 28th, the website LADBible reported on the prank video, commenting on some of the responses that the video was getting on YouTube. This is due to the fact in 2017 there were more than 400 confirmed acid attacks in London.[8] Those comments have since been deleted, however, the site published a screenshot of block of them in which users complain about how nice the people in the video appeared. The site also quotes an unnamed user who said, “With the increasing number of acid attacks on the streets of London, this video is anything but funny.” Within 24 hours, the article has been shared more than 11,000 times.



    Online Reaction

    On Twitter, people reacted negatively to the news of the prank video. Twitter user @BashSuperior tweeted, “Given the rise in acid attacks of late, I find this to be extremely disturbing. The ‘YouTuber’ is aware of the current climate and has chosen to exploit that for some kicks. @YouTube should take action against him and definitely shouldn’t allow him to profit off causing distress.” The post (shown below, left) received more than 830 retweets and 2,600 likes in 24 hours.

    Twitter[6] user Aimee_TW tweeted, “That YouTube prankster Arya has taken it too far with the ‘acid attack’ style prank.” The tweet (shown below, center) received more than 60 retweets and 530 likes in 24 hours. Additionally, Twitter[7] user @jamieandrews777 tweeted, “Think this guy needs to be sat down and have a chat with an acid attack victim. See how funny this type of ‘prank’ is then.” The tweet (shown below, right) received more than 190 retweets and 1,000 likes in 24 hours.

    That day, Twitter[15] published a Moments page on the reaction to the video.



    Mosallah’s Response

    On January 28th, Mosallah posted a response on his Instagram. [9] In a series of three posts, he expressed a series of opinions on the response to the video. The first post (shown below, left), Mosallah shared some of the headlines featuring the story and the caption “Yes lads we made it on the news !🤣💪🏼surprised they’re crying over 1 video, beg someone send them all of my videos 🤣😂” The post received more than 6,000 likes in 24 hours.

    In a followup post,[10] he wrote, “So my video been removed and I got a strike on my channel for throwing water on peoples faces when there are videos of bombing and stabbings and pornography on YouTube. Fair enough I understand why I shouldn’t have done it but is it really fair for youtube to listen to a bunch of boring ass old people who want to make someone coming up look bad and make me look like a criminal? At the end of the day I do this to entertain people and it’s my job, This is the time I need all my followers support, this is not fair.” The post (shown below, right) received more than 2,800 likes.



    Later that day, ItzArya[11] posted a video entitled “My Response.” In the video, ItzArya defended himself by saying that it was a “prank.” However, he said that he accepts some of the criticism he’s received and that his other videos would “anal” his detractors.



    Media Coverage

    Several media outlets covered the controversy including The Independent,[12] The Daily Dot,[13]NME[14] and more.

    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    Alec Baldwin’s Glengarry Glen Ross Scene refers to a monologue delivered by Alec Baldwin in the film Glengarry Glen Ross which became widely recognized as one of the best monologues of all time. Online, the scene’s fame has led it to be parodied in many notable videos.

    Origin

    Glengarry Glen Ross was released on October 2nd, 1992.[1] It is an adaptation by David Mamet of his Pulitzer and Tony Award-winning 1984 play of the same name. The film is about a real estate firm filled with many struggling salesmen. Early in the film, Baldwin’s character, Blake, is sent to the firm by the owners of Premiere Properties to motivate the sales team. He then unleashes a torrent of verbal abuse on the salesmen, questioning their manhood, and threatening them with termination. The scene was not included in the original play.



    Spread

    Baldwin’s monologue has been widely regarded as one of the most memorable in cinematic history. Newsweek wrote of Baldwin’s performance, “Baldwin is sleekly sinister in the role of Blake, a troubleshooter called in to shake up the salesmen. He shakes them up, all right, but this character (not in the original play) also shakes up the movie’s toned balance with his sheer noise and scatological fury.” It has been listed as one of the best monologues in film by filmsite.org.[2]

    The scene was widely parodied after its debut. In 2005, Baldwin parodied the scene on Saturday Night Live as he berated Santa’s elves (shown below).



    On March 17th, 2009, radio station WBEZ uploaded a parody of the scene prior to a pledge drive for the radio station (shown below, left).



    Torey Malatia Glen Ross from WBEZ on Vimeo.


    YouTuber LiamKyleSullivan uploaded a parody of the scene in 2012 with a YouTube-themed topic, gaining over 104,000 views (shown below, left). Baldwin would later joke about the scene in Boss Baby (shown below, right).. The Atlantic compiled a list of notable parodies on October 2nd, 2012.[3]



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/29/18--13:03: Is That Porn?
  • About

    Is That Porn? is a four-panel exploitable based a webcomic by Mr. Lovenstein. In the comic, a mother catches a boy nervously looking a computer only to reveal that he’s looking at an optical illusion of a vase that resembles two people kissing. Online, people replace the final panel, changing what the boy is looking at, for comedic effect.

    Origin

    On January 26th, 2018, webcomics artist Mr. Lovenstein[1] published a comic of a boy looking nervously at his computer. When his mother approaches and asks, “Is that porn?” he attempts to stop her from looking at the screen and says, “It’s a vase.” In the final panel, it is revealed that he is looking at an optical illusion of two people kissing that also resembles a vase. The post (shown below) received 6,300 reactions and 800 shares on Facebook. [2]



    Spread

    The following day, Redditor[3] fireork12 posted a template version with the word “vase” and the image on the screen photoshopped out in the /r/MemeEconomy. The post (shown below, left) received more than 11,000 points (92% upvoted) and 200 comments in 48 hours.

    That day, Redditor[4] MemeKrabs in the /r/dankmemes photoshopped the comic to show the mother saying “is that a normie subreddit?” The boy responds with “It’s dank.” The post (shown below, center) received more than 3,000 points (96% upvoted) and 50 comments.

    Throughout the day, more people uploaded variations to /r/dankmemes (example below, right)



    Various Examples




    Search Interest

    Not Available.

    External References


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  • 01/29/18--14:12: Smug Cheerleader
  • About

    Smug Cheerleader refers to a series of image macros in which users caption a picture of a cheerleader with a close-mouthed smile. Online, people describe this as a “petty” look and caption it accordingly.

    Origin

    On January 16th, 2018, YouTuber[1] Cheer Extreme published a video entitled “Senior Elite SOH 2018 Backstage, Performance & Awards.” At two minutes and 23 seconds, a cheerleader named Ryan Cummings makes the “smug” smile at the end of a routine. Within two weeks, the video (shown below) received more than 196,000 views.



    Spread

    That day, people began posting the image on Twitter. Twitter[2] user @SEtotheleft posted a five-second clip of the moment and the caption “big mood.” The post (shown below) received more than 39.7 million views, 77,000 retweets and 165,000 likes in two weeks.

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/29/18--17:50: Senori Derponi Shroomi
  • it’s how i am derpy and shrooms the rated film i enjoyed ended up in my insane mind.


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  • 01/29/18--21:42: Best Gyms in Wilmington NC
  • Looking for the best gyms in Wilmington, NC? Wait a moment! Why to go anywhere when a gym can come to your home. Yes, contact Lime Gorilla at 833-546-3348 because we bring a gym to our clients with a personalized fitness program and a personal trainer. Visit http://limegorilla.co/about-us/who-we-are/


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  • 01/30/18--07:42: Is Your Teen Texting About
  • About

    Is Your Child Texting About is a phrasal template meant to parody alarmist new reports regarding secret text-messaging codes that teenagers use. In this case, the code language is focused on a particular subculture, which in the context of the meme appears innocent.

    Origin

    While reports about teen texting languages have been made about such apps as Snapchat as well as text-message abbreviates, like LOL for the last decade, the earliest known instance of the parody was posted on June 21st, 2017 by Twitter[1] user @frost_emma. That day, the user posted a 2016 stock photograph[2] of a woman staring anxiously at her cell phone above a list of terms under the title “Is Your Teen Texting About Classical Music?” The post (shown below) received nine retweets and 11 likes. However, when shared on FunnyJunk, [3] the meme received more than 1,000 upvotes, and on the /r/ClassicalMemes[4]subreddit, it received more than 200 points (98% upvotes).

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/30/18--08:14: Parallel Lines
  • About

    Parallel Lines refers to an exploitable image demonstrating the definition of parallel lines, two lines which are the same distance apart and never touch. In the exploitable edits, the lines are labeled different things to make a humorous point about how two different objects never intersect.

    Origin

    On January 29th, 2018, Redditor shadesofgabe uploaded an image of parallel lines to /r/dankmemes,[1] making a “mods are gay” joke typical to the subreddit. The post gained over 21,000 upvotes (shown below).



    Spread

    Over the following day, the several users of the subreddit began creating images with the template. However, many of the posts using the template were made commenting on how it seemed unlikely the template would grow popular. Hours after the first post began getting popular on the subreddit, Redditor RodYT[2] uploaded a meta version to /r/dankmemes mocking the subreddit, gaining over 4,400 upvotes (shown below, left). Redditor Omrriii[3] uploaded a joke about how the format was destined to be quickly overused, gaining over 180 upvotes (shown below, right).



    Meanwhile, the format began trending on /r/MemeEconomy. Several posts on the subreddit reposted the original image. The most popular gained over 100 upvotes.[4] shadesofgabe, the poster of the original image in /r/dankmemes, posted a template in /r/MemeEconomy that gained over 30 upvotes (shown below, left). Another popular post in the subreddit made a joke about rotating text in MS paint, gaining over 40 upvotes (shown below, right).



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References


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  • 01/30/18--09:05: Periscope
  • About

    Periscope is a live-streaming application that allows users to broadcast video over the internet and viewers to react in real-time. The company was purchased by social media company Twitter shortly after release.

    History

    The idea for Periscope came when co-founders Kayvon Beykpour and Joe Bernstein were traveling in Istanbul, Turkey in 2013. While there, the protests in Taksim Square started, and Beykpour wanted to see what was happening. He soon realized that he could read about the event on Twitter, but he couldn’t see them.

    The following year, in February 2014, the two founded Periscope, raising money from angel investors.[1] In January 2015, Twitter purchased the app for somewhere between $50 and $100 million, according to reports.[2]

    On March 25th, 2015, Periscope launched on iOS. Several months later, on May 26th, the app launched on Android. [3][4]

    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    Fantasy Painting Object Labeling refers to a series of Object Labelingimage macros in which a piece of artwork, usually depicting a giant monster in battle with a small person or creature, is labeled to humorously depict everyday actions or emotions.

    Origin

    While the origin of labeling fantastical artworks for humorous purposes is unclear, one of the earliest known posts to use the format was posted December 27th, 2017 by Tumblr user sierraseybold.[1] She labeled the giant skeleton in the painting “Nightcrawler” by Boris Groh with “me at 3 am” and the person in the painting “shredded cheese at 3 am.” The post gained over 105,000 notes (shown below).



    Spread

    The trend began seeing momentum in late January of 2018. Several of these types of images were created by Instagram user youngbottomtext; their first, posted January 20th, 2018,[2] shows a giant labeled “me at 3 am” and a small person labeled “my meat.” The post gained 844 likes (shown below). Many of the images posted by youngbottomtext are edited versions of paintings by Instagram artist mr_werewolf.[3][4]



    Meanwhile, popular edits were posted on several different platforms. For example, on Tumblr, a Goth GF joke posted by funke[5] on January 27th, gained over 24,000 notes (shown below, left). On January 29th, a Mesothelioma Ad Copypasta joke was posted to /r/dankmemes[6] where it gained over 7,300 upvotes (shown below, right).



    On January 28th, 2018, PewDiePie uploaded a video in which he discussed the meme, saying he did not know the name but he brought up several examples. The video gained over 4.2 million views.



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References


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  • 01/30/18--10:57: Dora in a Coma
  • About

    Dora in a Coma refers to an image of the character Dora from Dora the Explorer seemingly hooked up to life support in a hospital bed. The image spread on Twitter as a reaction image for when a specific situation overwhelms the poster.

    Origin

    The image comes from the online flash game Dora Laparoscopic Appendectomy, a game in which the player performs an appendectomy on Dora. The game was posted September 1st, 2015 to Y8 games.[1] On January 20th, 2018, Twitter user @ShayBayBay18[2] uploaded the image with a joke about a Frank Ocean song, gaining 48,000 retweets and 118,000 likes (shown below).



    Spread

    As the tweet with the image got popular, it stoked Twitter users’ curiosity as to where the image came from. One rumor circulating was that it came from an episode of Dora the Explorer in which Dora gets Ebola (shown below, right). This theory is false, as no such episode exists. Twitter user @ginxie18[3] wrote a humorous backstory to the image in a tweet thread. The first tweet in the thread gained 80 retweets (shown below, right).



    On January 27th, 2018, YouTube channel The Roundtable posted a video on the meme, explaining its origin, gaining over 46,000 views (shown below).



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Y8 Games – Dora Laparoscopic Appendectomy

    [2]Twitter – @ShayBayBay18

    [3]Twitter – @ginxie18


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  • 01/30/18--11:14: PewDiePie's interest
  • This meme is pretty much suitable for all the situation, hope u like it and share! It’s about PewDiePie interested onto something


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  • 01/30/18--13:09: Black Ops Zombie Music
  • About

    Black Ops Zombie Music refers to music cues from the “zombie” mode of the video game Call of Duty: Black Ops which were used in shitpost videos in January of 2018.

    Origin

    Call of Duty: Black Ops was released on November 9th, 2010. The game features a “Zombie” mode in which the players play co-op and fight zombies (example of the music for the mode shown below).



    In January of 2018, shitposts using specific moments from the mode’s music began appearing on YouTube. One of the earliest known videos to feature the music in a shitpost-context was posted January 9th, 2018 by YouTube user crunch_memes, gaining over 9,700 views (shown below).



    Spread

    By January 13th, enough videos had been created that YouTube user SUCC MY MEMEREBORN uploaded a compilation of videos created with the music (shown below).



    A popular trope with the early edits of the meme was to have it feature Peter Griffin from Family Guy. On January 18th, YouTuber Peter Parker Cries uploaded a variation featuring Griffin that gained over 6,300 views (shown below, left). Another variation uploaded by Max from Rust that featured a 3D-rendering of Griffin gained over 3,200 views (shown below, right).



    Other pieces of pop culture used with the meme include Spongebob Squarepants and Monsters vs. Aliens. An inquiry about the memes was posted to /r/OutOfTheLoop[1] on January 30th, 2018.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References


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