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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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    About

    How Many Upvotes For Our Boys in Blue? refers to a series of posts popular on Reddit that parody posts popular on Facebook in which the poster bemoans the fact that certain celebrities or half-naked women can generate thousands of likes before asking how many likes can policemen (“Boys in Blue”) can get. In the parodies, the poster asks a variation of “How many upvotes can our boys in blue get?” and posts a picture of various blue characters instead of policemen.

    Origin

    The type of post the joke parodies is popularly shared on Facebook by supporters of police and the military. Generally, these posts complain about the popularity of “half-naked girls” online ask how many likes a member of the armed forces or police can get.



    On December 5th, 2016, Reddit user TankIFuckingAm posted a photo of the Mr. Meeseeks characters to the Rick and Morty subreddit, captioned “Half naked women get thousands of up votes; how many for our boys in blue?”[1] The post, shown below, gained over 6,700 points in a day and made the front page of Reddit.[2]



    Spread

    The popularity of the joke inspired dozens of variations in which the picture of the “boys in blue” was replaced by different blue characters from various television shows, video games, and popular media. A thread asking about the joke was posted to /r/OutOfTheLoop[2] the next day and received 650 points.[2] The Daily Dot[3] also covered it that day. In the /r/MemeEconomy, user HeHasABanana[4] encouraged members to “buy” as the meme increased in popularity in a post that gained 429 points.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    Unavaliable

    External References


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  • 12/06/16--16:18: This Meme Is From The Future
  • About

    “This Meme Is From The Future” refers to an image of a discolored old man being jumped on by three other discolored old men. The image is frequently referenced to as an image from the future in the year 42069 that has been sent back in time to 2016.

    Origin



    The first image of the meme was an image with an old man tinted yellow being jumped on by 3 other old men that look the same tinted green. purple and blue. (Shown Above) The image was first posted to the Reddit subreddit /r/me_irl on December 5th, 2016 by the user DanknessIn_MemesOut, where it gained over 25 thousand upvotes.[1]

    Spread



    On December 6th, 2016, Reddit user pepis3 posted an image of the 4 old men traveling back in time through a stargate with the caption “Rare image of a meme about to travel to the past (Circa 42069)”. (Shown Above, Left) The image gained over 9 thousand upvotes.[2] Later on December 6th, 2016, Reddit user Neceron posted an image of a meme of the month chart for the year 42069, with the three old men edited in for the month of December. (Shown Above, Right) The image gained over 9 thousand upvotes.[3]

    Various Examples



    External References

    [1]Reddit – me_irl

    [2]Reddit – me_irl

    [3]Reddit – me_irl


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  • 12/07/16--07:43: Planet Earth Iguana
  • About

    The Planet Earth Iguana is a baby marine iguana shown fleeing a swarm of snakes in the BBC nature documentary series Planet Earth II.

    Origin

    On November 6th, 2016, BBC aired the first episode of the nature documentary series Planet Earth II, featuring a scene in which a baby marine iguana is chased down by a group of snakes along the rocky coast of Galapagos island. BBC’s upload of the scene to YouTube gained more than 7.06 million views and 4,900 comments over the next month (shown below).



    Spread

    On November 7th, Redditor soldierofcinema submitted a clip of the scene to /r/television,[2] speculating it “could be the greatest TV moment ever.” Over the next month, the post gained over 99,900 votes (87% upvoted) and 4,800 comments. That day, Redditor Shitty Watercolor posted an illustration of the iguana next to a man covered in snakes to /r/funny,[1] where it gathered upwards of 34,700 votes (83% upvoted) in the first month (shown below).



    Meanwhile, Twitter user @Brian Grubb tweeted a clip of the chase scene dubbed with the NFL Primetime theme song (shown below).




    Also on November 7th, YouTuber ZarosTemplar uploaded the scene dubbed with the overture to the opera William Tell (shown below, left). On November 8th, YouTuber Ozzy Man Reviews reuploaded the scene with his commentary (shown below, right).



    On December 5th, Redditor thecoachtaylor uploaded a remix of the scene dubbed with a monologue by the Seattle Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch (a.k.a. “Beast Mode”) to /r/sports[4] (shown below). The following day, the Yahoo Sports Facebook[3] page reposted the remix.


    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 12/07/16--09:49: Time Person of the Year
  • Overview

    Time Person of the Year is a special issue published annually by the American news magazine Time featuring an extensive profile of an individual, a group, and sometimes an object, that is deemed exceptionally influential or newsworthy. Since its inception in 1927, the magazine’s end-of-year issue itself has grown into an influential barometer of power, including many controversial figures in modern history, “for better or for worse.”

    Background

    In 1927, editors of the news magazine selected Charles Lindbergh as the cover for the magazine’s first “Man of the Year” edition (shown below).



    Developments

    1982: Machine of the Year

    In 1982, the personal computer was selected as “Machine of the Year” as the first non-human to receive the title, beating rival candidates United States President Ronald Reagan and British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.



    “There are some occasions, though, when the most significant force in a year’s news is not a single individual but a process, and a widespread recognition by a whole society that this process is changing the course of all other processes. That is why, after weighing the ebb and flow of events around the world, TIME has decided that 1982 is the year of the computer.”

    1999: Person of the Year

    In 1999, “Man of the Year” was changed to the gender-neutral title “Person of the Year,” with Amazon founder and CEO Jeffrey Bezos selected as the year’s winner.



    2006: You

    In 2006, Time chose “You” as Person of the Year in recognition of those who contributed to user-generated websites, including Wikipedia, YouTube and various social media platforms (shown below). Additionally, Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez won the Time reader’s poll with 35% of the votes, who was not mentioned in the announcement.



    The editor’s choice was widely criticized as gimmicky, including pundit Paul Kedrosky who denounced the decision as a “cop-out.” On December 18th, blogger Kevin Friedl posted a screen captured image of The Dude looking in a Time “Man of the Year” mirror from the 1998 comedy film The Big Lebowski in a post mocking the year’s Person of the Year edition (shown below).[1]



    The following day, The Atlantic[4] published an op-ed by writer David Graham, who lamented those “ironically listing ‘Time Person of the Year, 2006’ in Twitter bios.”

    2007: Vladimir Putin

    In 2007, Russian President Vladimir Putin was selected as Person of the Year.



    2008: Barack Obama

    In 2008, United States President-elect Barack Obama was selected Person of the Year.



    2009: Ben Barnanke

    In April 2009, 4chan users raided Time’s “World’s Most Influential Person” poll, voting Christopher Poole (a.k.a. “Moot”) to the top ranked spot and spelling the phrase “marblecake also the game” vertically out of the first 21 nominees. On December 16th, Time announced that Federal Reserve chairman Ben Bernanke had been selected as Person of the Year (shown below).



    2010: Mark Zuckerberg

    In 2010, Facebook founder and CEO“Mark Zuckerberg”: was selected as Person of the Year (shown below).



    2011: The Protester

    In 2011, the magazine ran “The Protester” as Person of the Year in recognition of various global protest movements, including the Arab Spring, the Tea Party movement, Occupy Wall Street and the Indignants Movement.



    2012: Barack Obama

    In November 2012, 4chan users launched a campaign to vote in Kim Jong-Un as the Time Person of the Year (shown below, left). In December, Time selected United States President Barack Obama as Person of the Year for a 2nd time since 2008 (shown below, right).



    2013: Pope Francis

    In 2013, the 266th Pope of the Catholic Church Pope Francis was named Person of the Year (shown below).



    2014: Ebola Fighters

    In 2014, Time announced that “Ebola Fighters” would be recognized as person of the year, reffering to health care workers who prevented the spread of the ebola virus across West Africa.



    2015: Angela Merkel

    In 2015, German Chancellor Angela Merkel was selected as Person of the Year in recognition of her leadership in both the Greek debt crisis and the European migrant crisis.



    2016: Donald Trump

    On December 7th, 2016, Time revealed that United States President-elect Donald Trump was named Person of the Year.[3]



    That day, Redditor Nfgiven submitted a post announcing the results to the /r/The_Donald subreddit,[6] where it gained over 236,600 votes (54% upvoted) and 1,300 comments in six hours. Meanwhile, activist Shaun King tweeted the Trump magazine cover along with editions recognizing Adolf Hitler, Joseph Stalin and Vladimir Putin (shown below). That day, “Person of the Year” became a trending topic on the social networking platform.[7]



    The same day, voting ended for the online readers’ poll selecting the Person of the Year, showing Bernie Sanders in the lead with 10.2% of the vote (shown below).[2]



    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    Had It Not Been For the Laws of This Land refers to an image of a kid holding a knife with the caption “Had it not been for the laws of this land, I would have slaughtered you”. It is typically used in shitposting

    Origin

    The image originates from a trailer of the movie “13.30 Kaba Church” (shown below, left). The trailer was uploaded to YouTube on March 21st, 2014 by user Elvis Amofa.[2] It received over 13,000 views, 300 likes, and 20 comments in about 2 and a half years. About two years later, on January 26th, 2016, the section of the trailer where the image comes (shown below, right) from was uploaded to YouTube by Jarvis Gekkouga.[1] It received over 38,000 views, 740 likes, and 60 comments in about 10 months.




    Spread

    {WIP}

    The first known usage of the image (shown below) was on February 1st, 2016, by tumblr user dildonius, with the caption “when someone steps on the back of your shoe”.[3] The image obtained over 12,000 notes in about 10 months.




    Various Examples




    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]YouTube – Jarvis Gekkouga’s video / Posted on January 26th, 2016

    [2]YouTube – 13.30 Kaba Church Trailer / Posted on March 21st, 2014

    [3]Tumblr – when someone steps on the back of your shoe by dildonius / Posted on February 1st, 2016


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  • 12/08/16--05:08: I'm looking for...
  • A photo of a person looking for someone.


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  • 12/08/16--12:43: Spit facts
  • About

    Origin

    On 3 August, Michael Stevens, host of Vsauce YouTube channel, appeared in the HUMANCAKE episode of TVFilthyFrank on YouTube. He portrayed a homeless man lying next to a wall. When the chefs arrived asking for spit, Michael greeted them with “Hey Vsauce, Michael Here” and offered “some spit facts, too”. HowToBasic declined the offer and asked for “just the spit”. Michael argues “that’ll cost a little more”. He is given a bottle and spits into it. When finished, he slightly enthusiastically asserts “some spit facts”:

    Digestion begins in the mouth.
    Saliva starts taking food apart in the--

    Idubbbz tells Michael they’ve got more ingredients to collect, but Michael insists on providing spit facts. “In the salivary glands--” “Get the fuck back.” iDubbbz threatens. Michael returns to his homeless shelter and the chefs show a picture of Bill Nye the Science Guy with a caption below “Vsauce”.

    Spread

    The same day Michael tweeted under #spitfacts:


    Notable examples

    In the Fixed Points video on Vsauce YouTube channel, Michael slides the Hey! That’s Pretty Good iDubbbz quote.

    In the Why Mars? video As Jake greets “Vsauce I’m Jake”, the camera suddenly moves to Michael holding a cup of tea saying “Hey Jake”, pulling alot of tea into his mouth and then spitting it all at once.

    Search interest

    External references


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  • 12/08/16--13:55: Me in 2006 vs. Me in 2016
  • About

    Me in 2006 vs. Me in 2016 is a series on Twitter in which before-and-after photographs are juxtaposed along with variations of the caption “me in 2006 vs. me in 2016.”

    Origin

    On December 4th, 2016, Twitter user @TheTimeCowboy juxtaposed photographs of Shibu Inu dogs along with the caption “me in 2006 and me now” (shown below).



    Spread

    That evening Twitter user @xtop posted a picture of a dumpster next to a dumpster fire with the caption “Me in 2006 vs me in 2016” (shown below). Within four days, the tweet gained over 400 likes and 200 retweets.



    On Decembe 6th, The Daily Dot published an article about the Twitter series. On December 7th, Twitter user @BenJPierce[5] tweeted a screen capture of the Pixar character Dory next to a photograph of a Dory plush toy, garnering upwards of 1,400 likes and 420 retweets within 24 hours.



    On December 8th, the internet news blog UpRoxx[3] highlighted several notable examples of the Twitter meme.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 12/08/16--19:17: Hi, My Name's Catrina
  • About

    “Hi, My Name’s Catrina!”, also known as “when a new person starts at work,” is a video from the 1980’s British TV show Emu’s All Live Pink Windmill Show featuring young children introducing themselves.

    Origin

    Emu’s All Live Pink Windmill Show was the fifth television show for British comedian Rod Hull and his anarchic puppet Emu. Joined by a group of ten children in Hull’s Pink Windmill, featuring singing and dancing to many popular tunes from across the western world. [1] This video comes from the first episode of the series, where the kids introduce themselves to the audience in studio and at home before launching into a rendition of Can’t Stop the Music by the Village People.




    Spread

    On November 27th, 2016, the Facebook page Instant Regret posted the first 24 seconds of the video, garnering 88K reactions, 11M views, 83, 331 shares, and 223K comments, captioned “When a new person starts at work.” [2] It exploded over Twitter, with users tagging themselves as the “cool mom” [3] or “FCKNGOALS.” [4] User @suitelifeondick compared the experience to being greeted by the staff at cosmetics store Lush. [5] Lush’s Oxford Street branch in London responded by recreating the video, captioned as “Walking into Lush Oxford Street like…” [6] Vice UK’s Marianne Eloise was able to contact some of the actors in the video and got updates on their current lives. [7]

    Various Examples





    Google Trends

    External References


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  • 12/09/16--10:04: #DumpStarWars
  • About

    #DumpStarWars is a hashtag spread on Twitter that calls for a boycott of the upcoming film Star Wars: Rogue One after a rumor spread that scenes in the film had been altered to promote an anti-Trump agenda.

    Origin

    Anti-Star Wars sentiments had been spreading since Rogue One screenwriter Chris Weitz tweeted a few days after the 2016 United States Presidential Election that Star Wars was against hate and pointed out that the villainous Empire is a white supremacist organization.[1] This angered white supremacists, who had threatened to boycott the film.[2] The rumors of the boycott and the hashtag “#DumpStarWars” began to spread when Trump supporter Jack Posobiec[3] tweeted the hashtag along with an unsubstantiated claim that Star Wars writers had rewritten and reshot the film to include scenes that called Trump a racist.



    Spread

    Weitz was quick to call the notion that the film was rewritten to include anti-Trump scenes “completely fake,”[4] but the hashtag had already started to spread. One notable sincere response came from author Mark Dice, who claimed The Force Awakens and Rogue One were propaganda films and that Mark Hamill had claimed Luke Skywalker was gay. The tweet, shown below, gained 745 retweets and 1,745 favorites.



    However, the majority of posts including the hashtag were made to mock it.[5] Many users pointed out how Star Wars had always been about rebelling against white supremacy and fascism and that the boycotting the film for those ideals was oblivious and racist.[6] The AV Club,[7] Mashable,[8] and The Daily Beast[9] covered the spread of the hashtag.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 12/09/16--10:41: Fuck 2016
  • About

    “Fuck 2016” is an expression used by many online to lament various events that occurred during 2016, including the deaths of various celebrities, Brexit and the election of Donald Trump as President of the United States.

    Origin

    On January 10th, 2016, David Bowie died of liver cancer, leading many to mourn the English musician’s death one various social media platforms. On January 18th, the /r/Fuck2016[4] subreddit was launched, focusing on news related to the deaths of various celebrities.

    Spread

    On June 13th, 2016, Tumblr[8] user mimosataylor posted an image of a large eraser with the words “For Really Big Mistakes” printed on the side erasing the year 2016 (shown below). Within six months, the post gained over 123,000 notes. On July 31st, The Telegraph published an article titled “Is 2016 Really One of the Worst Years in History?”



    On September 8th, YouTuber Paint uploaded a music video titled “2016 Sucks Song” (shown below, left). On November 9th, BuzzFeed[7] published an article titled “Guys, It’s Official, 2016 Is Actually The Worst Year.” On November 13th, the television show Last Week Tonight aired a “Fuck 2016” segment, in which various comedians curse the year followed by host John Oliver detonating a “2016” sign (shown below, right).



    On December 6th, 2016, the entertainment news blog A.V. Club[1] published an article titled “The definitive meme of 2016 was ‘fuck 2016’.” The following day, YouTuber Boogie2988 posted a tweet[6] asking YouTube to skip their annual “Rewind” along with the hashtag “#Fuck2016”[5] (shown below). On December 8th, The Wrap[2] published a “listicle”: titled “16 Ways 2016 Is the Worst Year Since 2001.”



    Search Interest

    External References


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    Editor’s Note: This entry is a work in progress. If you think you can help, please request editorship.


    About

    That’s Where You’re Wrong Kiddo, also known as You’re Wrong Kiddo, refers to an image of a crudely drawn person making finger guns while saying “that’s where you’re wrong kiddo”. The image is often edited to refer to various events and express disagreement with ideas.

    Origin

    The image was first posted by Tumblr user dajo42 on February 20th, 2016, with the caption “you can’t just respond to everything with finger guns”.[1] It obtained over 290,000 notes in about 9 months.




    Spread

    {WIP}

    On June 16th, 2016, Reddit user TurtleLightning posted an edit of the image (shown below( to r/The_Donald. It obtained a score of over 6,500 (71% upvoted) in about 5 months.




    Various Examples




    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Tumblr – Origin


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    About

    Jimmy Neutron Valentine Cards Parodies is a meme of a image for Valentine’s Day from The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius.

    Origin

    W.I.P.

    Spread

    W.I.P.

    Various Examples

    W.I.P.

    Search Interest


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  • 12/11/16--02:28: TheLegend 27
  • TheLegend27 is from the ad on YouTube by game of war known as “Game of War: Campfire stories” the ad, at the time of this entry, has amassed 46 million views. The video depicts 4 people sitting around a campfire, playing game of war. They talk about the so called first game of war player and how strong she is.


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    (Feel free to join the entry development)

    About

    “This Guy Moaned at Least This Loud” is a memorable quote from an eyewitness describing a car accident in a Drivers’ Education DVD video LUV2XLR8 (short for Love To Accelerate).
    This gained popularity online because of the eyewitness’s unintentionally humorous moan despite having it’s intent to be serious about the situation and has inspired many video remixes online.

    Origin

    Speed & Aggression Toolkit DVD video

    (Date of release of this DVD is yet to be found)

    LUV2XLR8 is a video from the Drivers’ Education DVDSpeed & Aggression Toolkit published by The National Road Safety Foundation and distributed by Ohio Department of Public Safety.
    This video talks about two drivers who were in a street racing accident and the consequences of the choices they’ve made, along with eyewitnesses adding more depth to the tragedy. The moaning scene is at around the 2:46 mark.

    The video was uploaded onto YouTube on January 19, 2012 with over 21,000 views as of Dec 2016.

    Spread

    Important Videos

    In Oct 19, 2015, the moaning segment of the video was uploaded on YouTube.
    As part of the highly viewed Important Videos playlist made by eljolto[1], it has gained over 700,000 views.

    Reddit

    On the next month, on 05 Nov 2015, a post was submitted by SkoffMyWillie on Reddit talking about the moaning scene of the video. The post received over 132 points and 13 comments.[2]

    Various Examples

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 12/12/16--08:02: Milkwalker
  • About

    Milkwalker is a cartoon character of a milk carton introduced by American dairy cooperative Darigold, Inc. as its company mascot in the mid-1980s. Due to its eerily disproportionate physical appearance, the character became a popular subject of creepypastas and trollpastas on Tumblr in December 2016.

    Origin

    Milkwalker, an anthropomorphic milk carton, was originally created by Seattle-based dairy and agricultural co-op Darigold, Inc. as the mascot of the company and a public service announcement character that encourages children to remember their full name, address and telephone number in case of emergencies. On November 28th, 2016, over three decades after its introduction, various images of the obscure mascot began circulating online after it was highlighted by the Tumblr blog Heck-Yeah-Old-Tech (shown below).[1] The post garnered more than 49,000 notes within the first two weeks.



    The post’s author captioned the image:

    “There are some weird advertising characters out there. This is one of them: Darigold milk during the mid-1980s was putting Milkwalker, a pint of milk with arms and legs (and rather scary ones at that) and huge soul-gobbling eyes, on its boxes with tips on how to live your life safely. Those hinge knees, man.
    I’ve found no origin story, no other record of his being a thing that answers any questions about what Darigold was thinking and how long he was (to them and the schoolchildren who saw him daily) a thing.”

    Spread

    After heck-yeah-old-tech’s post, Milkwalker began generating fandom on Tumblr in the form of fan art and creepypasta-themed jokes that made the milkwalker look like a sinister character.[2] On December 10th, The Daily Dot[3] covered the spread of Milkwalker fandom. On December 11th, heck-yeah-old-tech’s original image was posted to r/WTF,[4] where it gained over 1,700 notes.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    National Geographic Great White Shark Photo refers to a composite image of a shark jumping out of the water which was falsely identified as National Geographic’s “Photo of the Year” in December 2016.

    Origin

    In December 2016, a digitally edited image of a created by Shutterstock[2] user Alexyz3d began circulating on Twitter falsely described as “National Geographic’s Photo of the Year,” with some attributing the photo to a fictional photographer named Bob Burton (shown below).



    Spread

    On December 4th, 2016, Twitter user @foomandoonian[1] tweeted Alexyz3d’s images, noting that the National Geographic claims were fabricated (shown below, left). Shortly after, Twitter user @PicPedant posted a link to the Shutterstock page for the original image (shown below, right).



    That day, Gizmodo published an article about the viral image. The following day, Snopes[3] published an article titled “Not-ional Geographic” listing the claim that the shark image was an award-winning National Geographic photo was “false.”

    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References


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  • 12/12/16--20:26: Wild Grinders
  • About:

    Wild grinders is a 2009-2013 TV animated series produced by professional skater Rob Dyrdek. The premise of the show follows a younger persona of Rob Dyrdek and the misadventures he faces with his friends and his dog, “Meaty” while skating. The show was notoriously panned, and holds a lower Imdb rating than even the Filipino-American animated show, “The Nutshack.” Online the show has taken a presence for its poor quality animation, low humor, and some seeing similarities between Wild Grinders and The Nutshack.

    Origin:

    The series was originally conceived by Rob Dyrdek, a professional skater, as a cartoon produced by him based around his experiences as a young adolescent. Around 2009, a web-series hosted by Kabillion On-Demand was put onto YouTube, and various featured merchandise and a podcast-like segment called “Wild in the streets” was also posted onto Rob Dyrdeks channel promoting the series. Many promotional media was made to help hype the series up before airing on Nickelodeon, including one clip with Rob Dyrdek dressed in a Lil-Rob mascot costume to help promote the show at a local mall. Various stop motion videos made by Rob Dyrdek was also put onto the web-series as well, made with the various toys and merchandise sold along with the show. By mid 2012, the Wild Grinders show was finally premiered onto Nickelodeon’s “Nicktoons” channel for a total of 2 seasons and 26 episodes, before being cancelled.

    Spread


    The show was critically panned upon release, with many critics and viewers calling the shows animation, writing, and humor poor. The production value of the show was also critically panned for its lazy flash animation, and the cast of characters in the series. The show online has also led some to draw parallels between this show and The Nutshack, with some even claiming that the same animation team behind The Nutshack also produced the Wild Grinders. Even so, this show has actually received a lower rating on Imdb and Tv.com, making The Nutshack a higher rated show.

    Various Examples

    On August 14th, 2016, user Aedan Senpai uploaded a video titled “THEWILDGRINDERSANDNUTSHACKRANT”, where he discusses the similatites between Myx’s The Nutshack and Nicktoons Wild Grinders, in a satirical manner.

    On October 1st, almost two months after Aedan Senpai’s video, user Mohammad M uploaded a video titled “Its the nutshack but with wild grinders”, where nearly all the characters in The Nutshacks intro were replaced by characters from the Wild Grinders. The video has received over 22,000 views and 500 likes as of December 12th.

    A month later on November 7th, YouTuber chopping boss uploaded a video titled “Wild Grinders anime op”, which creates a AMV using footage from The Wild Grinders and “Unravel” from Tokyo Ghoul. The video has received 3,500 views and 130 likes as of December 12, 2016.


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  • 12/12/16--23:56: Hackerman
  • About

    Hackerman refers to an image of actor Rami Malek dressed as his character Elliot Alderson from the USA Netowork television show Mr. Robot paired with the text “HACKERMAN” taken from a clip of the 2015 film Kung Fury.

    Origin

    On August 31, 2015 Reddit user JBisBlu submitted the original image to the /r/MrRobot subreddit (shown below left).[1] The image features Rami Malek dressed as his character Elliot Alderson from the USA Network television show Mr. Robot captioned with the text “HACKERMAN”. The image of Malek (shown below center) was taken from a July 20, 2015 Instagram post by the show’s official account “whoismrrobot”[2] and as of December 12, 2016 has 3,998 likes and 182 comments. The “HACKERMAN” caption was taken from the 2015 comedy film Kung Fury (shown below right).[3]


    Various Examples

    External References

    [1]Reddit – Hackerman – Inspired by Kung Fury : MrRobot

    [2]Instagram – Original Image

    [3]YouTube – Hackerman – Kung Fury


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  • 12/13/16--06:06: Fuller House
  • About

    Fuller House is a sitcom and sequel to the 1987–95 television series Full House, airing as a Netflix original series. It was created by Jeff Franklin, and is produced by Jeff Franklin Productions and Miller-Boyett Productions in association with Warner Horizon Television.

    History

    In August 2014, reports circulated that Warner Bros. Television was considering a series reboot. John Stamos, who had an ownership stake in the show, headed up the attempt to get the series back into production. Creator Jeff Franklin returned as executive producer and showrunner with the collaboration of original executive producers Thomas L. Miller and Robert L. Boyett under their Miller-Boyett Productions label.

    Premise

    The series centers around D.J. Tanner-Fuller, a veterinarian and widowed mother of three sons, whose sister and best friend, the mother to a teenage daughter provide support in her sons’ upbringings by moving in with her.

    Reception

    Fuller House initially received generally negative reviews, with most noting the series was very derivative of its source material and was oriented toward fans of the original show. On Rotten Tomatoes, the series has a rating of 33%, based on 40 reviews, with an average rating of 4.2/10. The site’s critical consensus reads, “After the initial dose of nostalgia, Fuller House has little to offer to anyone except the original series’ most diehard fans.” On Metacritic the series has an average score of 35 out of 100, based on 27 critics, indicating “generally unfavorable reviews”.
    h2. Fandom

    Online Relevance

    Related Memes

    Search Interest


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