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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 02/10/14--12:50: Dumb Starbucks
  • Overview

    Dumb Starbucks Coffee is the name of a coffee shop that opened in Los Feliz, California as a parody of the American global coffeehouse chain Starbucks. Upon its opening in February 2014, the store gained much notoriety online after photographs of the storefront began circulating on various social media sites.

    Background

    On February 7th, 2014, a coffee shop named “Dumb Starbucks Coffee” opened for business in Los Feliz, California. The same day, the store launched the @DumbStarbucks Twitter feed, featuring photographs of the storefront.




    As part of the store’s promotional event for its grand opening, all drinks were served to customers free of charge. In addition, the store offered a “frequently asked questions” sheet, which cited the fair use law as legal protection for parodying the Starbucks coffee chain stores.



    Notable Developments

    On February 8th, the @DumbStarbucks Twitter feed posted a photograph of their full menu, which features Starbucks-style beverages prefaced with the word “dumb.”




    The same day, actor Rainn Wilson from the television sitcom The Office posted several photographs of the store on his Instagram feed,[3] which received over 11,400 likes in the first 48 hours.



    Starbucks’ Response

    On February 9th, Southern California Public Radio[1] (SCPR) quoted Starbucks spokesperson Megan Adams who said the company was looking into taking legal action against the store. On the following day, SCPR[2] published a follow-up article which included a statement from spokeswoman Laurel Harper:

    “We are evaluating next steps, and while we appreciate the humor, they cannot use our name, which is a protected trademark.”

    News Media Coverage

    In the coming days, many news sites published articles about the new coffee shop, including the LA Times,[4] Time,[5]USA Today,[6] The Hollywood Reporter,[7] BuzzFeed,[8] The Daily Mail[9] and Gawker.[10]

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 02/10/14--15:23: Missed Connections
  • About

    Missed Connections is a sub-section of Craigslist under the Personal section. It allows people to post personal ads that tell stories of chance meetings that never had an exchange of contact information in the hopes the other party will read it and contact the writer.

    Origin

    Related Memes

    Illustrated Missed Connections

    Almost on the L

    http://www.buzzfeed.com/memecore/hipster-missed-connections-1ea9


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  • 02/11/14--12:48: Full House
  • About

    Full House is an American sitcom that follows a father as he raises his three daughters with the help of his best friend and his brother-in-law after the death of his wife. The series premiered on ABC on September 22nd, 1987, and concluded after eight seasons on May 23rd, 1995. Helped in part by ’90s nostalgia and reruns of the show playing constantly on ABC family in the late 90s and early 2000s, the show has a large online following.

    Premise

    Danny Tanner invites his best friend from childhood, Joey, and his late wife’s brother, Jesse, to move in with him to help him raise his three young daughters, DJ, Stephanie, and Michelle. As the children grow up their family expands as Jesse marries and has his own two children, though his new family lives in the Tanner house as well.



    History

    Full House was created by Jeff Franklin.[1] The series concluded its run in 1995, but ran in syndication on ABC Family from 2003 to 2013 and on Nick at Nite from to 2009.

    Reception

    Full House was nominated for many awards during its eight season run including two Kids’ Choice Awards and 23 Young Artist Awards.

    Online Presence

    As of February 2014 Full House’s Facebook page[2] has over 4.3 million likes.

    Tom Hanks Full House Poetry

    On October 23rd, 2012, The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon uploaded a video of actor Tom Hanks reading a slam poem based on Full House he read on the show. As of February 2014, the video has over 2.2 million views.



    Reunions

    25th Anniversary Reunion

    On September 22, 2012, the cast of Full House (except Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen, who shared the role of the youngest daughter) met up in LA for the shows 25th Anniversary. Actress Andrea Barber, who played Kimmy, the Tanner’s neighbor, tweeted a photo from the reunion featuring Candace John Stamos, Cameron Bure , Lori Loughlin, Jodie Sweetin, Scott Weinger, and Dave Coulier.[7] Many sites such as Buzzfeed[8] and People[9] reported on the reunion.




    Jesse and the Rippers Reunion

    Jimmy Fallon Reunion

    On January 29th, 2014, the three male leads from the show John Stamos, Dave Coulier, and Bob Saget appeared on Late Night With Jimmy Fallon to perform a skit dressed as their Full House characters in a recreation of the show’s youngest daughter’s bedroom (with Fallon filling that role). It was uploaded to the show’s YouTube channel[3] that day and as of February 2014, it has over 8.2 millions views.



    Related Memes

    Dave Coulier a Day

    On November 21st, 2011, the Tumblr blog Same Pic of Dave Coulier[4] was created. The blog features the same picture of Coulier, who play Joey, in one of the very loud sweaters he often wore on Full House uploaded every day. The Tumblr was covered in posts by Cracked[5] and Buzzfeed.[6]



    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]IMDBFull House

    [2]Facebook – Full House

    [3]YouTube – Full House" Guys Reunite On Jimmy Fallon (Late Night with Jimmy Fallon)

    [4]Tumblr – samepicofdavecoulier

    [5]Cracked – 6 Ridiculous Tumblrs That Yahoo Just Paid $1 Billion For

    [6]Buzzfeed – Dave Coulier + Same Picture + Every Day

    [7]Entertainment Weekly- Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen skip ‘Full House’ reunion, we wonder why

    [8]Buzzfeed- The Cast Of “Full House” Reunited

    [8]People- Full House Cast Reunites for 25th Anniversary


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  • 02/11/14--14:12: Operation Trololol
  • Operation Trololol, or Operation Balkhi was a raid in the Talibans official Twitter, @ABalkhi. Over 80+ forumers of 4chan or ‘’Imperial Guards’’ participated in the event, with the attempt to make the Talibans shut down their Twitter.

    On 5th of January of 2014, a forumer posted in 4chan’s /b/ board, pointing out that the Talibans have Twitter. People remarked that the Talibans should shut it down, thus making images of invitations, posting it in Anonymous sites like ChatRoulette, GloPoll, Omegle, etc.

    The attack consisted of 5 hours, divided into 5 sections. First was a moderate amount of posts with the username ’’ImperialGuard’’ with numbers.With time, names 0-99 were taken, and the forumers were forced to input different variations, such as 1A, 1B, 2A, etc.

    The second hour was a mass posting of the same posts ‘’Stop right there, Criminal Scum!…’’ and pictures of dead talibans.
    The third, consisted of a full overload of posting, and almost every forumer was making 3 posts per minute, calculate that, how many would over 100 do? Yes, alot.

    Fourth hour was when ‘’shit would hit the fan, if they didnt shut it down yet’’ , according to an anonymous forumer. This one consisted of pornographic pictures, and even MORE Imperial Guards submitted to the cause yet.

    Fifth Hour wasn’t really planned, they thought the Twitter would be shut down until then, so they had to do it manually.
    Mass requests of /b/ackup were sent to 4chan’s /b/ board, in wich lots, lots of more guards tried to shut down the Twitter themselves, via brute force hacking the password, and deleting the account once and for all. However, the attack failed at this time, as the password was too hard to brute-force break, and the Twitter Staff Team took place at that time, and banned most of the Imperial Guards present. The Imperial Guards hopped on onto ImperialGuard19’s (Named below) alternate accounts, and tried again, wich resulted even worse. Until now, 2 of the main accounts are still on foot (01 and 1B)

    None of these Imperial Guards shall be named, and may remain Anonymous. However, there are ImperialGuards more important than others, such as 01 (Creator of the Raid) 19(Made alternate accounts for everyone, in case of a ban.) and 1B (Established an IRC chat network with a name yet to be discovered.)


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  • 02/11/14--20:00: Animated Text
  • About

    Animated Text is a hashtag used to describe a 3D text banner that has been animated and looped in GIF form. On Tumblr, it is used to place an extra emphasis on one’s opinion or statement, much akin to the use of reaction images. In terms of aesthetics, animated text is quite similar in appearance to a WordArt object found in Microsoft Office.

    Origin

    The single topic blog AnimatedText was created by Brooklyn-based designer Catherine Frazier on November 30th, 2012.

    External References

    [1]Tumblr – Animated Text

    [2]Frazier Design – Catherine Frazier

    [3]The Daily Dot – AnimatedText makes pop culture phrases actually pop


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  • 02/12/14--08:27: IceJJFish
  • About

    IceJJFish is the pseudonym of singer-rapper Daniel Mcloyd who gained notoriety online for his YouTube music videos and off-key vocals.

    Online History

    On December 20th, 2011, Mcloyd uploaded his first video to YouTube, which featured his cover of the 1999 hip hop song “Back That Ass Up” by Juvenile (shown below). On December 27th, he uploaded a rap song titled “DMoney – Higher Than an Airplane” (shown below, right).



    On January 11th, 2012, IceJJFish uploaded a video titled “The Best Singer Ever to Live,” in which he sings a song in a high-pitched voice while drumming a beat with his hands (shown below, left). On January 20th, he uploaded a similar-style video titled “The Most Talented Singer Ever” (shown below, right).



    On November 18th, 2013, Mcloyd posted a cover of the 2013 R&B song “Hold On, We’re Going Home” by Drake (shown below, left). In the following three months, the video accumulated upwards of 555,000 views and 2,200 comments. On December 3rd, Mcloyd launched a Facebook[2] page titled “The Famous Ice JJ Fish,” which gained over 25,600 likes within two months. On January 6th, 2014, the IceJJfish YouTube channel uploaded a music video for the song “No Topping You,” in which a shirtless Mcloyd is shown embracing a woman while serenading her (shown below, right).



    On the Floor

    On February 6th, 2014, IceJJFish uploaded the music video for his track “On the Floor,” in which he is shown wooing a young woman in a variety of locations (shown below). The following day, Redditor mrpinenutz submitted the video to the /r/videos[1] subreddit, where it gained more than 1,700 up votes and 280 comments. On February 9th, The Huffington Post[3] highlighted the music video and mocked the video’s description claiming that Mcloyd was “comparable to the second coming of Jesus.. maybe even 2pac.”



    Popular Videos



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 02/12/14--08:45: Rejected Candy Hearts
  • About

    Rejected Candy Hearts are a series of images parodying Sweethearts, a type of small heart-shaped candies sold around Valentine’s Day, with custom generated messages that are unromantic, off-putting or suggestive in nature. As it is with the actual candies, Rejected Candy Hearts can be seen as a seasonal meme on Twitter that peaks around Valentine’s Day each year.[3][4]

    Origin

    On February 13th, 2009, Buzzfeed[8] reported on the ACME Heart Maker[9], a website that allows visitors to create customized candy hearts with messages that are two lines long with no more than four characters per line.

    Spread

    On February 13th, 2011, rejected candy hearts went viral on Twitter, spawning a large collection of Sweethearts parodies with custom-generated messages under the hashtags #rejectedcandyhearts and #candyheartrejects. In the following 24 hours, several internet humor sites and blogs ran compilation posts highlighting the best of #rejectedcandyhearts, including Funny or Die[1] and The Huffington Post.[2] Around the same time in February 2014, a web-based app called Cryptogram[5] was launched to allow easy creation of Sweethearts parodies, which was subsequently picked up by Geekosystem[6] and Geek Sugar[7] on February 13th.



    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Funny or Die – 13 Rejected Candy Hearts

    [2]The Huffington Post – Candy Heart Rejects On Twitter: The Funniest Tweets

    [3]Cafe Mom – 10 Hilarious ‘Candy Heart Reject’ Tweets Will Make You LOL

    [4]Salon – Rejected candy heart sayings

    [5]Cryptogram- hearts

    [6]Geekosystem- This Website Lets You Make Your Own Candy Hearts, So We Made Some Nerdy Ones for You

    [7]Geek Sugar- Make Your Own Rejected Candy Hearts

    [8]Buzzfeed- Uncomfortable Hearts

    [9]Acme- Heart Maker


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  • 02/12/14--10:53: Arctic Monkeys
  • About

    Arctic Monkeys is a British indie rock band formed in 2002, consisting of members Nick O’Malley, Jamie Cook, Matt Helders, and Alex Turner.

    Early Career

    The Arctic Monkeys signed with their first label, Domino Records, in 2005.[1] Their first and second singles, “I Bet You Look Good On The Dancefloor” and “When The Sun Goes Down” both reached number one on the UK charts.



    In 2006 they were nominated for two Grammy Awards, Best Rock Instrumental Performance and Best Alternative Music Album. [5] The band has recorded a total of five albums: Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not (2006), Favourite Worst Nightmare (2007), Humbug (2009), Suck It and See (2011), and AM (2013).

    Online History

    As of February 2014, Arctic Monkeys’ Facebook Page[2] has over 4.6 million likes and their Twitter account[3] has over 800,000 followers. There are also over 6,000 fan art submissions for the band on DeviantArt[8].

    On Tumblr

    The band is very popular on Tumblr, where in one month alone there were 57,000 posts tagged Arctic Monkeys. Popular fan runs Tumblr dedicated to the band include fuckyeaharcticmonkeys[6] and arcticmonkeysus.[7] In addition to Tumblrs focusing on the Arctic Monkeys’ music there are blogs that focus on fan fiction and fan art about the band. Tumblr blog arctickanefanfiction[9] published its first fic on April 24th, 2012. Followers may submit their own fan fiction to be posted by the blog. Arcticmonkeysart[10] was created on June 10, 2012, and focuses on fan art for the band including sketches, painting and mixed media. There are also blogs dedicated only to the band’s lead singer Alex Turner, including arcticalex[11] and alexturner.[12]



    Reputation

    Popular in the UK since their first single, they performed during the opening ceremony of the London 2012 Summer Olympics. Their popularity in America was cemented when they sold out a performance in New York City’s Madison Square Garden on February 8th, 2014. Their concert fell on the 50th Anniversary of The Beatles performance on the Ed Sullivan Show, and the cover of The Beatles’ song “All My Lovin’” they performed that night was uploaded to YouTube the next day. In less than a week it gained over 100,000 views.



    Following the show Nate Auerbach, Tumblr’s music evangelist, told the newspaper The Guardian[4] that “This[the Arctic Monkeys] is bigger than Lady Gaga on Tumblr right now.” Auerbach went on to explain, “The internet is the new Ed Sullivan show,” meaning he believes American audiences are discovering Arctic Monkeys on Tumblr like Americans discovered The Beatles through TV.

    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 02/13/14--10:04: Michael Dunn's Murder Trial
  • Overview

    Michael Dunn’s Murder Trial (also known as “The Loud Music Trial”) is an ongoing trial of Florida resident Michael Dunn for fatally shooting 17-year-old Jordan Davis in November 2012. Since the trial began in early February 2014, the case has garnered much attention in the social media, with many speculating that the shooting may have been racially motivated and others comparing it to the trial of George Zimmerman trial, a Florida man who was charged with the murder of black teenager Trayvon Martin, but found to be not guilty in July 2013.

    Background

    On Black Friday in 2012, Jordan Davis (shown below, right) was shot and killed by Michael Dunn (shown below, left) in Jacksonville, Florida following an argument regarding loud music coming from the car Davis was sitting in. Following the shooting, Dunn was charged with first-degree murder and three counts of attempted murder. Davis’ parents Ron and Lucy hired lawyer John Michael Phillips[3] in the case against Dunn and to work against Florida’s controversial “Stand Your Ground” laws.



    Notable Developments

    News Media Coverage

    In the weeks following the shooting, the murder was covered by several news sites, including CNN,[4] NY Times,[5] The Huffington Post,[6] Daily Kos,[7] NY Daily News[8] and MSNBC.[9]

    Online Reaction

    On November 28th, 2012, The Young Turks YouTube talk show uploaded a segment discussing the murder, in which the hosts questioned the validity of Dunn’s “stand your ground” defense.



    On July 14th, 2013, Redditor twr3x submitted a post to the /r/news[11] subreddit, asking why the shooting of Jordan Davis was not headline news. Prior to being archived, the post gained more than 2,200 up votes and 530 comments. In the comments section, several Redditors replied that the story was not headline news because it was clear Dunn would be convicted of murder.

    Justice For Dunn Movement

    On September 26th, 2013, the JusticeForDunn[1] website was launched, which includes Dunn’s version the events in which he claims he shot Davis in self defense after hearing several threats against his life and seeing what he thought was a shotgun in the rear passenger seat of the car. On November 5th, 2013, a the “Justice For Michael Dunn” Facebook[2] was launched for discussions regarding the trial.



    Trial

    On February 3rd, 2014, jury selection for the trial commenced. According to the Twitter analytics site Topsy, there were 24,300 tweets containing the hashtag #dunntrial on February 10th (shown below).



    On February 11th, Dunn took the stand to argue his defense, claiming he drove away from the scene of the crime after believing no one had been hurt, adding “I had every right of self-defense, and I took it.” Assistant State Attorney John Guy told jurors that Dunn told falsehoods to detectives during questioning, pointing out inconsistencies regarding the number of drinks he consumed that evening, a scowling man Dunn claims to have seen in the back seat of the vehicle and whether he heard Davis yelling “This (expletive)’s going down now!” prior to opening fire. Dunn’s fiance Rhonda Rouer testified that Dunn did not mention seeing a shotgun or any other weapon following the shooting.

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 02/13/14--11:39: Happy Birthday Colin
  • About

    Happy Birthday Colin is a Facebook page created by a mother living in Michigan to cheer up her ten-year-old son Colin after he told her that he did not want a birthday party because he has no friends to invite. Within days, the page was quickly filled with thousands of well wishes.

    Background

    Colin, a 10-year-old boy with Asperger’s syndrome living in Richland, Michigan, will turn eleven on March 9th, 2014. When his mother Jennifer offered to throw him a birthday party, he told her it would be “pointless since he has no friends.”[2] Then on February 2nd, Jennifer created a Facebook page[1]titled “Happy Birthday Colin" for her friends to leave birthday wishes for Colin, expecting a few dozens of likes or responses at the most, if any.


    Yet, to Jennifer’s much surprise, the page gained over 8,000 likes within the first the week, and as of February 13th, the page has more than 1.7 million likes. Jennifer has further explained on the Facebook page that she wants to keep the birthday wishes a secret from her son until his actual birthday.

    Notable Developments

    Media Coverage

    On February 9th, Colin and Jennifer’s story was covered by their local news channel Wood-TV8 (shown below).[3]
    On February 10th, UK Newspaper The Daily Mail[4] covered the story, and on February 12th, Mashable[5] and Fox News[6] published pieces on the Facebook page.



    Multi-Media Response

    On February 11th, Jennifer posted a picture on the Facebook page of the first birthday cards Colin received through a P.O. Box she listed on the Facebook page.



    Several groups have create videos to wish Colin a happy birthday, leaving them on the Facebook page. The videos include a message from Texas’ Rosenberg Police Department, and Indiana University’s Alpha Xi Delta sorority, both uploaded on February 12th.



    Search Interest



    External References


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  • 02/13/14--13:59: Shoshi Games
  • About

    Shoshi Games is an exploitable photoshop meme in which screen shots of Girl’s character Shoshanna (played by actress Zosia Mamet) are put on images of athletes competing in the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics.

    Origin

    The images of Zosia Mamet as Shoshanna Shapiro come from episodes of the HBO comedy Girls. On February 11th, 2014, the Tumblr Shoshigames[1] was created, which creates and posts the images along with comments written in Shoshanna’s voice such as “Curling? I’ve been doing that since my bat mitzvah.” and “Are we going to a Drybar? #helmethair.”

    Spread

    On February 12th, the Shoshigames Tumblr started the companion Twitter account [2] @ShoshiGames2014. As of February 13th the account has over 300 followers. The Huffington Post,[3] Mashable,[4] and New York Magazine[5] also covered the meme on February 12th.

    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    [not yet available]

    External References


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  • 02/13/14--14:20: Haribo Sugarless Gummy Bears
  • About

    Haribo Sugarless Gummy Bears are a candy produced and sold by Haribo, a gummy company from Germany. The product has developed a significant awareness online for the intense intestinal discomfort it causes on mass consumption.

    Origin

    (researching)


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  • 02/13/14--14:43: Tear Jerker
  • (W.I.P. Researchers and editors needed)

    About

    Tear Jerker is a moment where it invokes sadness and sorrow. It can happen in movies, video games, story tales or even in real life.


    History and Origin
    wip

    For the word origin, the word “tear jerker” comes from somewhere between 1930 to 1935 where it was combined with two words tear and jerk with the suffix -er, according to Dictionary.com.[2] The first known use of this word is in 1912.[1] TV Tropes also uses this term.[3]


    Tearjerker has an unclear origin of where it was first coined. However, it probably stemmed off the word, melodrama, which is a dramatic work with characters put in danger to appeal for emotion.


    Spread


    (w.i.p).


    Notable Examples


    Search Interest



    External References

    fn1. Tearjerker-Definition from Merriam Dictionary
    fn2. Tearjerker Definition in Dictionary.com
    fn3. Main/TearJerker – Television Tropes & Idioms


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  • 02/13/14--15:30: Singles Awareness Day
  • Overview

    Singles Awareness Day (S.A.D.) is a holiday for people who are not involved in romantic relationships as an alternative to Valentine’s Day. Those celebrating the event are encouraged to wear the colors green or black to show contrast to the color red associated with Valentine’s Day.

    Background

    It is unclear when and by whom the holiday was invented, but the earliest known mention of the term can be found on Luceo Magazine[2] in an article posted on February 16th, 2002. In the article, the author Aimee Monique Hale proposed that Valentine’s Day should be renamed to “Singles’ Awareness Day” in celebration of singlehood.

    Notable Developments

    2005

    There were few online discussions recognizing the Single Awarness Day as the anti-Valentine’s Day until February 15th, 2005, when Loving You Forums[5] member Pepe created a thread titled “Valentine’s Day = Singles’ Awareness Day.”

    2006

    On January 12th, 2006, the Singles Awareness website was launched, which declared that the holiday would fall on February 15th instead of the 14th. On September 14th, 2006, an Urban Dictionary[1] entry for Singles Awareness Day was created by user misosoupaddict, defining it as a day that “reminds those who do not have a Valentine of their singleness.”

    2007

    On February 13th, 2007, DeviantArtist[6] Son-Neko published a webcomic on how to survive Singles Awareness Day (shown below).



    2008

    On February 14th, 2008, the New York Times[3] City Room blog published an article about Singles Awareness Day and other backlashes to Valentine’s Day.

    2009

    On February 2nd, 2009, YouTuber Ryan Mercer uploaded a video about celebrating Singles Awareness Day as an alternative to Valentine’s Day (shown below).



    2010

    On January 23rd, 2010, a Facebook[7] page titled “Valentine’s Day = Singles Awareness Day” was launched, gathering upwards of 14,000 likes in the next four years.

    2012.

    On February 0th, 2012, YouTuber hoorahjencar uploaded a Singles Awareness Day music video, which gained over 1.4 million views and 2,200 comments in the first two years.



    2013

    On February 13th, 2013, Redditor R3DMUSTARD submitted an image macro of a man crying while drinking Listerine mouth wash titled “Singles Awareness Day” to the /r/funny[8] subreddit. Prior to being archived, the post garnered more than 12,700 up votes and 250 comments.



    2014

    On February 10th, 2014, the CherryBombComedy YouTube channel uploaded a public service announcement parody video for Singles Awareness Day (shown below). On February 13th, the video was highlighted on The Huffington Post.[9]



    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    Metal Gear Solid Game Over Parodies refer to screenshots created in the style of a “Game Over” screen from the Metal Gear franchise.

    Origin

    The original Metal Gear Solid featured a number of allies that Solid Snake, the game’s protagonist, could talk to via codec. Should the player die in the game, one of the allies that Snake has contacted will futilely try to make contact with him (shown below, left), usually by a variant of “Snake? Snake!? SNAAAAAAAAAAAKE!”. The sequence is considered to be unintentionally funny due to the overacting of the vocal cast, and is also used for self-parody in the form of Easter Eggs of later titles, such as Snake’s own call to Colonel Roy Campbell in Super Smash Brothers. Brawl (shown below, right).


    Spread

    Some of the earliest parodies of the “Game Over” sequence could be found on user-generated website YTMND starting in 2004.[1] The first of these parodies, Mario Gear Solid used content from the Super Mario series, made by user toastypk. Since the site’s posting in May 17, 2004, the site has obtained over 75,000 views, over 700 votes (with a site average of 3,88/5.00), over 50 favorites, and a total of 100 comments.[2] The site gained steady popularity over time, and several variations appeared since then, such as Metal Gear Wilson, Nintendo 64 Gear Solid, Metal Gear Chocolate, Metal Gear Flintstone, and Metal Gear Doc. The search term “Metal Gear” brings over 600 results on the website.[3]

    In addition to the “Snake? Snake!? SNAAAAAAAAAAAKE!” parodies, other spoofs relating to the series’ “Game Over” sequences have risen in popularity. In Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons Of Liberty, the message “Fission Mailed”, a corruption of “Mission Failed”, appears twice near the climax of the game as a way to fake out the player, giving them the impression that they somehow lost in one of the game’s climactic battles. The phrase itself has gained notability as a way to call out failure between Metal Gear fans. Likewise, the prequel Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater used the term Time Paradox for nonstandard “Game Overs”, should the player do something that directly prevents later events in the series from occurring. This term is used by fans to call out plot inconsistencies and make fun of hypothetical occurrences that would apply to the concept.

    Search Interest


    External References


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  • 02/15/14--13:02: S.T.A.L.K.E.R.
  • About

    S.T.A.L.K.E.R. (Scavenger, Trespasser, Adventurer, Loner, Killer, Explorer, Robber) is a series of first person shooter survival horror video games developed for PC by a now defunct Ukrainian developer GSC Game World. It is set in a alternate universe where a second explosion occurs in the area surrounding Chernobyl, creating a place called “The Zone”.

    History

    The series was originally inspired by a science fiction novel Roadside Picnic written by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky in 1971, and a loosely based film adaptation Stalker, released in 1979. Some of the games’ terminology is borrowed from them.

    The original game named Shadow of Chernobyl[2], was originally announced in November 2001 and to be released in 2003, but due to the release date being pushed back multiple times, the game was considered vaporware[1]. The game was eventually released in March 2007 under the publisher THQ, getting generally positive reception.

    Other installments in the series include: Clear Sky[3], a prequel released in August – September 2008, and Call of Pripyat[4], a sequel released in October 2009 – February 2010.



    Another sequel named S.T.A.L.K.E.R. 2 was announced in August 2010, however it was cancelled due to the developer studio dissolving. The team who worked on the game formed a new studio called Vostok Games, and are developing a spiritual successor of the S.T.A.L.K.E.R. series, a free-to-play MMOFPS named Survarium[10].

    Online Presence

    Due to the games’ grim atmosphere and harsh difficulty, the series has garnered a significant following within the gaming community, with a wiki site[5], a Facebook page[6], and several forums[7] dedicated to it. The series also has a presence within sites like 4chan, Reddit, and Tumblr. The series also has an active modding community, with sites such as ModDB[8] and FileFront[9] holding a large variety of game modifications: from patches and bugfixes, to additional content and game overhauls.

    The series fandom has created numerous pieces of artwork over the years and even created several short films based in the S.T.A.L.K.E.R. setting.


    Related Memes

    Get Out Of Here, Stalker!

    “Get Out Of Here, Stalker!” is a phrase which comes from the original entry in the S.T.A.L.K.E.R. game series: Shadow of Chernobyl. It’s often used in discussions surrounding the games and game related image macros.


    Cheeki Breeki

    Cheeki Breeki is a phrase associated with stock quotes, repeated by the stalkers of the Bandit faction during the gunfights with them. It is widely used within the community in discussions and image macros.


    X Soon, Fellow Stalker

    X Soon, Fellow Stalker is a comic, featuring one stalker warning another about the upcoming blowout. When asked about when the blowout occurs, the stalker reveals a skull face and proclaims NOW. The image has been parodied several times.


    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 02/16/14--01:04: Twitch Plays Pokemon
  • Overview

    Twitch Plays Pokemon[1] is an ongoing live-stream event hosted by the video-streaming platform Twitch.tv in which any member of the site can participate in a massively multiplayer online co-op version of Nintendo’s 1996 role-playing video game Pokémon Red by inputting various commands in chat.

    Background

    Powered by a combination of JavaScript, Python code and the Game Boy emulator VisualBoyAdvance, the massively multiplayer co-op version of Pokémon Red was launched by an anonymous Australian programmer via Twitch.tv on February 13th, 2014.[4] In the game, participants can crowd-control the movement of the main character by typing one of a series of commands (A, B, Left, Right, Up, Down, Start, and Select) in the channel’s chatroom. However, the high volume of input commands from tens of thousands of participants led to much confusion and conflict in gameplay, soon rendering the game almost unplayable. The viewer count has reached over 100,000 at its peak.

    Notable Developments

    Within three days of its release, twitch plays pokemon became a popular tag on Tumblr[2] where various image macros were created about the events taking place in the game, and a dedicated subreddit was created for the stream.[6] It became a controversial topic on 4chan when mods began deleting threads about the stream on every board, before eventually allowing threads on /vp/, the Pokémon board. Online news websites such as Kotaku,[3] Polygon,[4]CNET,[5] and The Independent,[7] published articles about the stream.

    Derivatives

    Inspired by the success of Twitch Plays Pokemon, many others on Twitch began creating similar streams. Many streams were made for different Pokémon games, such as Blue Version,[9] Crystal Version,[10] and FireRed Version.[11] A stream was made where the actions in Twitch Plays Pokemon would control a game of Tetris.[12] A stream known as RNG Plays Pokemon also had Red Version, but the character was controlled by an RNG randomly selecting buttons.[13]

    Memes and In-Jokes

    Helix Fossil

    Due to the many commands being input at once, it was common for items to be selected accidentally during battles. The second item in the player’s bag, the Helix Fossil, was selected so often that it came to be viewed as the player looking to it for guidance, and Twitch users began referring to it as a deity. Other items treated this way were the Moon Stone, Nugget, and S.S. Ticket.



    The Ledge

    Ledges are obstacles in Pokémon games which can be passed through on one side, but not on the other. At one point in the game there is a long ledge with only one unit of space to walk past it; thus, even a single person giving a “down” command would cause the player to go through the ledge, requiring the character to backtrack and go through again. Due to the large number of trolls in the stream, it took multiple hours to get past a single ledge, causing ledges to be viewed as a large obstacle by the viewers, even though they are usually minor nuisances in normal Pokémon games.



    Trees

    Trees are another type of obstacle in Pokémon games. In the first generation of Pokémon games, trees can be removed by going to the menu, selecting a Pokémon which knows the move Cut, and using Cut while facing the tree. Due to the large number of commands needed to achieve this and the lack of coordination among the Twitch users, trees became notorious for being extremely difficult to get past. One particular tree took multiple hours to remove.



    Eevee Debate

    There was a large argument in the chat about whether or not to get the Pokémon Eevee. Doing so would have been a risky move, as it would necessitate evolving it to Vaporeon in order to have a Pokémon which would learn Surf. This would require the viewers to successfully buy and use a Water Stone without wasting all the player’s money. If this failed, something would need to be deposited in the PC in order to get Lapras, another Pokémon which could learn Surf, which would risk accidentally releasing a high-level Pokémon.

    Despite the obvious downsides to doing so, the majority of users chose to get Eevee. They then failed to buy a Water Stone, accidentally buying a Fire Stone and evolving Eevee into Flareon. After going to the PC to deposit it, they accidentally released “ABBBBBBK(” (a.k.a. Abby) the Charmeleon and “JLVWNNOOOO” (a.k.a. Jay Leno) the Rattata. They also put Pidgeot, the highest-level Pokémon on the team, and the Helix Fossil into the PC (although both were later retrieved). Because the source of all this was Eevee, Eevee began to be viewed as a “false prophet” and servant of the Dome Fossil, which was viewed as Satan. However a day later, Flareon was released, the same fate of Abby and Jay Leno.



    Team Rocket Hideout Maze

    One of the areas the player must get through is called the Team Rocket Hideout. Inside the Team Rocket Hideout is a maze which involves tiles that when stepped on propel the player in a certain direction. In order to get past this maze, one needs to maneuver through spaces that are only one tile long, and moving outside this space would cause the player to walk onto one of the tiles which would move them back to the start of the maze. Due to the 80k+ people entering commands and the 20 second lag between entering the command in chat and it being registered by the game, the maze has proven to be even more difficult than the ledge. Twitch users spent a full 24 hours attempting to clear the puzzle before the streamer implemented a voting system on which actions to take, which finally allowed them to get through the maze.



    Anarchy vs. Democracy / Start9

    After failing to clear the Team Rocket Hideout puzzle after 24 hours, the streamer implemented a voting system where it would count up all the commands entered, and after 20 seconds take the action which was entered most often. It also included a slider for “anarchy” or “democracy” which could be influenced by entering one of the words into the chat. Anarchy was the mode it was in previously (all inputs registered by the game) and democracy was the new mode (most commonly-input action in 20 seconds is carried out).

    The democracy mode was widely viewed as slowing down progress, taking away the excitement, and generally ruining the fun of the game. Because democracy mode allowed users to input several actions at once, supporters of anarchy mode began saying “start9”, which would open and close the menu 9 times. This was meant as a form of protest against democracy mode



    External Links


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  • 02/16/14--09:43: Classic Game Room
  • [W.I.P.]



    About

    Classic Game Room is a video game reviewing show that was founded, produced, and directed by Mark Bussler that featured reviews of both classic and modern games, accessories, and even miscellaneous things like food and pinball machines. The show is known for it’s non-conventional style of reviewing, witty and lighthearted nature, and it’s focus on finding the “fun” in games. The show was originally being broadcasted on the video-sharing website Youtube, but later moved to it’s own website due to recent copyright issues with Youtube.

    Origin

    Classic game room originally started in 1999 under the name “The Game Room,” Created by Mark Bussler and Dave Crosson, and was the said to be the first video game review show on the internet. The show ran on a $50 dollar budget, which would latter lead to their cancellation on October 23, 2000 due to slow episode production and their revenue failing to cover the show’s cost. The show was later revived on February 20, 2008 under the name “Classic Game Room HD” with Mark being the only host. As of December 13, 2013, Mark left Youtube and began posting his reviews on his own site following Youtube’s content ID policy.

    Reception

    Classic Game Room has been praised numerous times for it’s range and diversity in it’s game reviews, Mark Bussler’s charismatic and witty personality, and it’s deadpan style of humor. Special praise is given to the fact that Mark “Likes to find the fun in games because not every game has the same audience,” a simple practice that is considered ignored in mainstream journalism. The fanbase has also received praised for it’s calm and collected nature, as well as it’s support for Classic Game Room, which Mark referenced in his review of Twisted Metal: Head On for the Playstation Portable, though he is often criticized for his lack of focus or tendency to change the subject, which was a major complaint in his review of the Nintendo Wii U.

    Related Subjects

    Viral Dog



    Mark’s pet dog, Stella (A.K.A. Viral Dog), is a German Shepard/Chow chow mix and is one CGR’s main mascots that made her first debut in September 21, 2007 in a video called “Stella the Wonderdog! Most Cute Puppy in the Land!” Though she occasionally makes cameo appearances in a few of CGR’s videos, she has had several videos dedicated to her, most of which include mark giving her exaggerated praise while using reverb.

    Zombies



    In his Left 4 Dead and the Last of Us reviews, he shares his theories on why zombies are popular in mainstream entertainment. In his Left 4 Dead review, he says that the reason why zombies are cool is that they have an honest nature, as opposed to humans, who he claims to be liars/fakers. He gives a more serious theory in his review of the Last of Us, where he states that “the reason we are fighting zombies is because developers and/or publishers can’t afford to alienate any one group of people or country these days.”

    Leaving Youtube



    On December 12th, 2013, Mark released a video saying that there will be changes to the Classic Game Room website, and that he will be posting his reviews on there using Dailymotion’s video sharing from now on. He has also commented that “the show will go on (despite changes to a certain website)” implying that his reason for leaving is due to youtube’s Content ID policy. Despite this, he still posts videos on youtube regularly, most of which subtly criticizes youtube’s changes to their copyright policies.

    Search Interest


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  • 02/16/14--10:56: Incremental Games
  • About

    Incremental Games, also known as Idle Games, are browser and mobile games in which the player accumulates in-game resources by clicking or over time by letting the game run in the background.

    History

    In April 2013, French indie game developer Aniwey released the ASCII art browser game Candy Box,[1] in which the player slowly accumulates candies over time that can be used to purchase items. On June 10th, Doublespeak Games released the incremental browser game A Dark Room,[2] in which the player starts the game in a dark room before collecting enough items and resources to explore the outside world.



    On August 10th, the game Cookie Clicker was released, featuring a giant cookie that the player must click to create cookies used to buy upgrades that assist in cookie production. The original version was created by game designer Julien Thiennot in August 2013, who came up with the idea for the game while playing Aniwey’s Candy Box.



    On September 14th, the /r/incrementalgames[3] subreddit was launched, where members discuss various incremental browser and mobile games. Within the first five months, the subreddit received more than 5,000 subscribers. On November 2nd, a similar subreddit /r/idleclickinggames[4] was launched. On October 25th, the Breaking Bad-themed browser game> was created, featuring a meth cooking and distribution simulation (shown below, left). Clicking Bad[6] On January 31st, 2014, the idle game CivClicker was released, in which the player hires workers to acquire resources in a similar vein to the strategy game series Civilization[7] (shown below, right). On February 12th, The Daily Dot[5] published an article about the rise of Cookie Clicker and other incremental games.



    Other Popular Games

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Aniwey – Candy Box

    [2]Doublespeak Games – A Dark Room

    [3]Reddit – /r/incrementalgames

    [4]Reddit – /r/idleclickinggames

    [5]The Daily Dot – The most addictive new game on the Internet

    [6]Nullism – Clicking Bad

    [7]DMHolley – Civ Clicker


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  • 02/17/14--09:38: #DangerousBlackKids
  • About

    #DangerousBlackKids is a Twitter hashtag used to protest the mistrial verdict in the trial of Michael Dunn, a Florida resident who was charged with murder after fatally shooting a black teenager named Jordan Davis in November 2012.

    Origin

    On February 15th, 2014, after nearly two weeks of arguments and deliberation in the trial of Michael Dunn, the jury found him guilty[1] of three charges of attempted murder and one count of shooting into a vehicle, however, they failed to reach a verdict on the charge of first-degree murder in the death of Davis, leading Judge Russell L. Healey to declare a mistrial. On the day after the announcement of the mistrial, many took their reactions to the jury’s verdict on Twitter, including @thewayoftheid[2], who used the hashtag #DangerousBlackKids for the first time to address the mistrial verdict and implications about racial stereotypes surrounding black youths and teenagers.



    Spread

    Within 24 hours of @thewayoftheid’s tweet, the hashtag #DangerousBlackKids was used on Twitter more than 16,000 times. On February 16th, several websites reported on the hashtag campaign and compiled some of the most popular examples, including The Huffington Post,[4] Buzzfeed,[5] and Complex.[6] Also on February 16th, @TheObamaDiary[7], a Twitter account about Obamacare, tweeted the hashtag with childhood photos of President Obama and the First Lady.
    Within a day the hashtag had been used on Twitter over 16,000 times. On February 16th, several websites reported on the hashtag and compiled some of the most popular examples including The Huffington Post,[4] Buzzfeed,[5] and Complex.[6] Also on February 16th, @TheObamaDiary[7], a Twitter account about Obamacare, tweeted the hashtag with childhood photos of President Obama and the first lady.




    Notable Examples




    Search Interest



    External References


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