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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 01/11/18--14:46: LegalFling
  • About

    LegalFling is an application that uses block chain technology to allow sexual partners to give consent on a public digital ledger. Online, many reacted negatively to the idea of a “blanket” consent form, arguing that consent “is something that occurs continually throughout a sexual encounter.”

    History

    LegalFling was created by the block chain LegalThings, a company that generates live contracts, a digital contracts platform.[1] In January 2018, LegalThings announced LegalFling, a live contract app specifically sexual encounters.

    Features

    The app allows you to request consent from anyone of your LegalFling contacts.[2] Much like Tinder, the app allows you two simple forms for selection. Tap an “X” for denial of consent and a heart for approval.

    The app also allows you to personalize your account. As the site says, “It’s up to you how far you want to take it. Set boundaries and configure your personal preferences.”

    Additionally, if one breaks the contract, there are penalty clauses, whcih allow the user to trigger cease and desist letter and penalty payments.



    Highlights

    Criticism

    On January 10th, the technology website Gizmodo[3] referred to the idea of a block chain contract for consent as “deeply flawed representation of sexual consent.” They continued:

    “A blanketed contract ahead of engaging in sexual contact signals that consent is simply a one-time checklist. Consent, however, is something that occurs continually throughout a sexual encounter. As RAINN points out, “Giving consent for one activity, one time, does not mean giving consent for increased or recurring sexual contact,” and someone can also withdraw their consent at any time during sexual activity. People are allowed to change their minds--swiping “okay” beforehand should not outweigh someone’s discomfort during a sexual encounter, and it should certainly not be held to a higher legal standard.”

    Search Interest

    External References


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    Overview

    Donald Trump’s “Shithole” Comments refer to United States President Donald Trump’s alleged assertion that Haiti, El Salvador and African countries are “shithole countries.” The reaction to President Trump’s remarks were largely negative, from the public, the media, law makers and world leaders. President Trump has since denied making the comments.

    Background

    On September 5th, 2017, United States Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that the president would be rescinding the Obama-era DACA program, which protects undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children, known as Dreamers, from deportation.[1] This gave congress until March 5th, 2018 to legalize DACA or else those protections would be lifted. Over the next few months, DACA was used as part of negotiations for such immigration policies as border security and the Trump-proposed Mexican border wall.

    During such negotiatians on January 12th, 2018, President Trump invited representatives from congress to discuss a bipartisan immigration deal. When the prospect of protecting immigrants from Haiti, El Salvador and African countries, the president reportedly said, “Why are we having all these people from shithole countries come here?”[2]

    According to people familiar with the meeting, Trump continued that the U.S. should bring in more immigrants from countries, like Norway, before saying, “Why do we need more Haitians? Take them out.”

    Development

    Online Reaction

    Following Trump’s alleged remarks, many online denounced his assertion to that those countries are “shitholes.” On Twitter, many people said that this was another example of President Trump’s perceived attitudes towards non-white people (examples below). Some went on to say, “Trump is a racist.”



    That day, Redditor[3] xxxDubsxxx posted a video in the /r/PublicFreakout subreddit of former CIA counterterrorism official Philip Mudd denouncing the president’s comments, stating that this type of hostility toward immigrants is something that his family dealt with as Italian and Irish immigrants in the early 20th century. The post received more than 60,000 points (80% upvoted) and 7,700 comments in 15 hours. The video (shown below) was also shared by Redditor[4] DestinyPvEGal in the /r/MurderedByWords subreddit, where it received more than 19,000 points (81% upvoted) and 1,800 comments in 12 hours.



    Trump’s comments made the frontpage of several other subreddits. Redditor[5] billndotnet’s thread on the comments in the /r/politics subreddit received more than 56,000 points (85% upvoted) and 14,000 comments. Redditor pipsdontsqueak’s thread in the /r/worldnews subreddit received more than 60,000 points (76% upvoted) and 13,000 comments in 18 hours.

    That day, on “/r/The_Donald” subreddit, Redditor[16] carpedonktum posted a Daily Struggle variation, featuring the options “Those Countries Aren’t Shitholes” and “Illegal Aliens Can’t Go Home Because Their Country Is a Shithole.” The post (shown below) received more than 13,000 points (83% upvoted) and 600 comments in 13 hours.



    Media Coverage

    Virtually every major news outlet covered Trump’s comments, including CNN,[7] The New York Times[8] Uproxx[9] and more.

    For their January 12th cover, the New York Daily News[12] put an image of Donald Trump as a poop emoji on the cover with the headline “S**T FORBRAINS: Trump spews vicious slur against immigrants.”



    That night, Fox News’[15]Tucker Carlson defended the president’s alleged remarks. He said, “President Trump said something that almost every single person in America actually agrees with. An awful lot of immigrants come from this country from other places that aren’t very nice. Those places are dangerous, they’re dirty, they’re corrupt, and they’re poor and that’s the main reason those immigrants are trying to come here and you would too if you live there.”

    “The President of the United States is Racist”

    That night, CNN anchor Don Lemon opened the show he hosts, CNN Tonight, by saying “The President of the United States is racist.”[10] The comments went viral and were discussed at length on social media. Twitter[11] published a Moments page regarding the response to Lemon’s broadcast.



    Haitian Response

    That night, former Haitian Prime Minister Laurent Lamothe tweeted, “The world is witnessing a new low today with this #ShitholeNations remark! totally unacceptable! uncalled for moreover it shows a lack a respect and IGNORANCE never seen before in the recent history of the US by any President! Enough is enough!!” The post (shown below) received more than 1,900 retweets and 4,500 likes in less than 24 hours.



    Trump’s Denial

    On January 12th, President Trump denied making such remarks. He tweeted,[13]“The language used by me at the DACA meeting was tough, but this was not the language used. What was really tough was the outlandish proposal made – a big setback for DACA!” The post (shown below) received more than 12,000 retweets and 48,000 likes in less than six hours.



    Following Trump’s denial, Senator Richard J. Durbin of Illinois who attended the meeting said that thre president not only used the term, but also said it “repeatedly, during the course of the meeting on immigration,” according to the New York Times.[14] Of Trump’s denial, Durbin said, “It’s not true. He said these hate-filled things and he said them repeatedly.”

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/14/18--19:52: Skynion
  • Calamity



    Meme YouTube

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUB2WrCrA7RG-lSWloW5HaQ


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  • 01/11/18--14:46: LegalFling
  • About

    LegalFling is an application that uses block chain technology to allow sexual partners to give consent on a public digital ledger. Online, many reacted negatively to the idea of a “blanket” consent form, arguing that consent “is something that occurs continually throughout a sexual encounter.”

    History

    LegalFling was created by the block chain LegalThings, a company that generates live contracts, a digital contracts platform.[1] In January 2018, LegalThings announced LegalFling, a live contract app specifically sexual encounters.

    Features

    The app allows you to request consent from anyone of your LegalFling contacts.[2] Much like Tinder, the app allows you two simple forms for selection. Tap an “X” for denial of consent and a heart for approval.

    The app also allows you to personalize your account. As the site says, “It’s up to you how far you want to take it. Set boundaries and configure your personal preferences.”

    Additionally, if one breaks the contract, there are penalty clauses, whcih allow the user to trigger cease and desist letter and penalty payments.



    Highlights

    Criticism

    On January 10th, the technology website Gizmodo[3] referred to the idea of a block chain contract for consent as “deeply flawed representation of sexual consent.” They continued:

    “A blanketed contract ahead of engaging in sexual contact signals that consent is simply a one-time checklist. Consent, however, is something that occurs continually throughout a sexual encounter. As RAINN points out, “Giving consent for one activity, one time, does not mean giving consent for increased or recurring sexual contact,” and someone can also withdraw their consent at any time during sexual activity. People are allowed to change their minds--swiping “okay” beforehand should not outweigh someone’s discomfort during a sexual encounter, and it should certainly not be held to a higher legal standard.”

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/15/18--06:29: Saints Fans Be Like
  • Reaction shot of New Orleans Saints player reacting to their last-second loss to the Minnesota Vikings in the 2018 NFL playoffs


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  • 01/15/18--07:55: Google Arts & Culture
  • About

    Arts & Culture is a website and mobile application made by Alphabet. The product was created to give users an immersive experience when viewing or learning about art, utilizing virtual reality, facial recognition software and high-powered search.

    History

    On July 19th, 2016, Google launched “Arts & Culture,” an iOS and Android application and website that allows users to explore the contents of more than 1,000 countries in more than 70 counties.[1] That day, they released a video[2] (shown below) to introduce the app, which as of January 2018, has received more than 200,000 views.



    Features

    Arts & Culture works similar to other Google products, using the company’s high powered search features to allow users to explore thousands of works from their phone or desktop. By typing specific words or colors, the app searchs more than a thousand museums around the world for the best possible matches.

    The app also created various ways to through art, both by time and color. These allow users to find exactly what they’re looking for.[3]

    Additionally, using Google Cardboard, the company’s virtual reality viewer, the app allows users to explore various museums, historical sites and concert halls from the first person perspective.[4]



    The app alosh as a feature called “Art Reconizer.” With this feature, users can take a picture on their phones of a piece of art and Google will search galleries around the world. TechCruch called the feature “like Shazam, but for art.”[1]

    On December 15th, 2017 Google updated the app to include a face match feature. Users take selfies in the app, and Google uses facial recognition software to match the user’s face with a piece of art they most closely resemble.

    Highlights

    Face Match

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/15/18--09:44: Hawaii Missile False Alarm
  • Overview

    Hawaii Missile False Alarm refers to an emergency alert residents of the state of Hawaii received, warning them on an impending “ballistic missile threat.” The alert created a panic in the state until the alert was deemed a false alarm about 30 minutes later.

    Background

    On January 13th, 2018, residents of the state of Hawaii received an emergency alert notification reading, “BALLISTICMISSILETHREATINBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEKIMMEDIATESHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.”[1]



    Developments

    Public Reaction

    Residents in Hawaii took the warning serious, sending panic throughout the state. Videos of people running for shelter quickly appeared online. AFP News Agency[2] posted a video of various smart phone recordings of people running for shelter. The video (shown below) received more than 49,000 views in 24 hours.



    On social media, people began tweeting their concerns about the supposedly oncoming attack. That day, Twitter[3] user @michellebvd tweed the message with the caption “Omg.” The post (shown below) received more than 1,800 retweets and 4,300 likes in 48 hours.



    Additionally, people also began tweeting about saying goodbye to their loved ones and preparing for the attack. Twitter[4] user @kxmbrly_ tweeted, "There was an Emergency alert for a missile threat in Hawaii around 8 am Hawaii time. My mom texted me around that same time, “I love you” and it’s just now clicking why she randomly sent me that 😭 because she thought that was her last moments. I’m sitting at work crying." The post (shown below, left) received more than 2,800 retweets and 17,000 likes in 48 hours.

    Twitter[5] user @brynguist tweeted, “At 8:07am everyone in Hawaii got a phone alert: BALLISTICTHREATINBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEKIMMEDIATESHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL. The next 10 minutes were the most terrifying of my life, until I finally checked twitter and saw this. But seriously, WTF just happened.” The tweet (shown below, center) received more than 2,000 retweets and 7,000 likes in two days.

    Twitter user @KPRC2Sara tweeted a text series of text’s she received during the scare, including the caption “This was my phone when I woke up just now. I’m in Honolulu, #Hawaii and my family is on the North Shore. They were hiding in the garage. My mom and sister were crying. It was a false alarm, but betting a lot of people are shaken. @KPRC2” The post (shown below, right) received more than 9,900 retweets and 26,000 likes in two days.



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]CNNMissile threat alert for Hawaii a false alarm; officials blame employee who pushed ‘wrong button’

    [2]YouTube – Hawaii panics after false alert of incoming missile

    [3]Twitter – "@michellebvd’s Tweet ":https://twitter.com/michellebvd/status/952241113158463488

    [4]Twitter – @kxmbrly_’s Tweet

    [5]Twitter – @brynguist’s Tweet

    [6]Twitter – @KPRC2Sara’s Tweet


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  • 01/15/18--10:01: Pencil Music
  • About

    Pencil Music refers to a series of videos in which a person manipulates a pencil to create music. This is generally done by either hitting specific points of the pencil to create different tones or by drawing with the pencil in the rhythm of another song. After a video of a person writing a math problem to the rhythm of the Cantina Theme from Star Wars went viral in January of 2018, many videos using the practice were posted to YouTube and a subreddit devoted to the practice swiftly grew to over 14,000 subscribers.

    Origin

    The practice of manipulating a pencil to create musical tones has appeared online for several years. One of the earliest known videos posted to YouTube in which a person creates music with a pencil was posted December 26th, 2007 by user moscati, who recreated the “William Tell Overture” by hitting a pencil in his mouth. The video gained over 1,400 views (shown below).



    Spread

    In the ensuing years, several other videos in which people manipulated pencils to create music appeared on YouTube. For example, one of the most popular videos using the practice, posted May 28th, 2015, showed a boy playing Darude’s Sandstorm on pencil, gaining over 7.2 million views (shown below, left). On October 16th, 2017, YouTuber It’s a small world uploaded a video of themselves drawing an image where each pencil stroke matched the rhythm of “All Star” by Smash Mouth, gaining over 450,000 views. This practice of writing in pencil to the rhythm of popular songs would go viral several months later.



    /r/pencilmusic

    On January 10th, 2018, YouTuber Dani Ochoa uploaded a video of herself writing a math problem, with each of her pencil strokes matching the rhythm to the Cantina Theme from Star Wars. The video gained over 5.3 million views (shown below). The same day, Ochoa uploaded a video of herself writing a math problem to the rhythm of The Imperial March from Star Wars, gaining over 2 million views (shown below).



    The following day, a subreddit devoted to the practice, /r/pencilmusic,[1] was created. In four days, the subreddit grew to over 14,000 subscribers. Ochoa, who on Reddit goes by /u/smallgoblin, is one of the moderators of the subreddit and has the title “Concept Creator.” The subreddit was covered the following day by Motherboard.[2] As of January 15th, 2018, the top posts in the subreddit besides Ochoa’s works are the video of the boy playing “Sandstorm” gaining over 1,400 upvotes[3] (shown below, left), and the “All Star” cover. Videos inspired by Ochoa’s work include a drawing of Mario to the rhythm of the Mario Theme posted by Luis Ramirez (shown below, left) and writing to the Mii Channel Theme Music posted by SirMasCat (shown below, right).



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/15/18--11:09: Testing The Waters
  • About

    Testing The Waters refers to an exploitable image of a bird stretching its leg out towards a body of water. In the exploitables, the bird and the water are labeled different things.

    Origin

    On July 18th, 2017, Twitter user @catesish[1] posted the image to Twitter and captioned it the ol razzle dazzle, gaining over 85,000 retweets and 218,000 likes (shown below).

    Spread

    Various Examples

    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References

    [1]Twitter – @catesish


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  • 01/15/18--12:39: Cantina Band
  • About
    “Cantina Band,” also known as “The Cantina Theme,” is a memorable song from the soundtrack to the 1977 science fiction space opera film Star Wars: Episode IV -- A New Hope. Since first appearing in Star Wars, the song has been a fan favorite, inspiring a host of covers and remixes.

    Origin

    Composed by conductor John Williams, “Cantina Band” first appeared in the film Star Wars: Episode IV -- A New Hope, which premiered on May 25th, 1977.[1] In the film, the protagonist Luke Skywalker leaves his farm home and enters the Mos Eisley cantina, a bar. Skywalker’s mentor Obi-Wan Kenobi says, “Mos Eisley Spaceport. You will never find a more wretched hive of scum and villainy. We must be cautious.”[2]

    When they enter the bar, Figrin D’an and the Modal Nodes are performing. The song they play, known colliqually as “Cantina Theme,” is listed as “Cantina Band” on the Star Wars soundtrack.[3]



    Spread

    Later that year, recording artist Meco released a funk version of both the Star Wars theme and “Cantina Band” (shown below, left). On October 1st, 1977, the “Cantina Band” single hit #1 on Billboard’s Hot 100 list. The song would go on to sell two million copies, becoming the biggest-selling instrumental single in the history of recorded music.[4]

    On June 6th, 2006, Wookieepedia user C3PO the Dragon Slayer identified the name of the song that Figrin D’an and the Modal Nodes perform as “Mad About Me.”


    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Wikipedia – Star Wars

    [2]Wookieepedia – Mos Eisley

    [3]Wikipedia – Figrin D’an and the Modal Nodes

    [4]Wikipedia – Star Wars Theme/Cantina Band

    [5]Wookieepedia – Mad About Me


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  • 01/15/18--12:43: Yobby
  • About

    Yobby is the fanmade father of the fictional dinosaur character Yoshi from the Super Mario video game franchise.

    Origin

    On February 22nd, 2016, Tumblr user iguanamouth[1] posted an illustration of a blue-colored dinosaur along with the caption “I had a dream where I met Yoshi’s dad but his name was Yobby and he looked like this” (shown below). Over the next two years, the post accumulated more than 146,400 notes.



    Spread

    On March 13th, 2016, iguanamouth[2] posted illustrations of Yobby opening his mouth in two different ways (shown below). Within two years, the post gained over 27,200 notes.



    On March 18th, Tumblr user the-entire-tpoh-fandom posted a sound file titled “yobby.mp3” along with the original illustration of the character, garnering upwards of 4,200 notes within two years.


    https://the-entire-tpoh-fandom.tumblr.com/post/141289325871/yobbymp3

    On September 13th, Tumblr user khosatral posted an animated GIF of Yobby wearing a cowboy hat while twirling a lasso. Within 16 months, the post gained over 1,500 notes.



    On December 5th, 2017, a screenshot of the iguanamouth post was submitted to the /r/TwoBestFriendsPlay[3] subreddit, where it accumulated more than 1,300 points (96% upvoted) and 60 comments over the next month.

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/12/18--10:02: #BlackHogwarts
  • Abou

    #BlackHogwarts is a hashtag that started on Black Twitter in which people reimagine specifics from the Harry Potter series from an African American perspective

    Origin

    On January 10th, 2018, Twitter[1] user @Bruce_Cares tweeted, “Yoooo imagine Swag Surfin in the Great Hall after Ravenclaw wins the House Cup! #BlackHogwart.” The tweet (shown below) was the earliest known iteration of the hashtag, receied more than 680 retweets and 1,150 likes in two days.



    Spread

    Throughout the day, more people continued to post jokes, images and gifs of what a “Black Hogwarts” might be like. On January 11th, Twitter[2] user @MrMarcus260 tweeted a picture of man with sunglasses on raising his hand and the caption, “When professor Snape tries to skip over slavery in your history of Muggles class #BlackHogwarts.” The tweet (shown below, left) received more than 6,900 retweets and 20,000 likes in 24 hours.

    Twitter[3] user @VanThson tweeted, “When you get to Platform nine and three quarters and you realize you have to run though a wall to board the train. #BlackHogwarts.” The post (shown below, center) received more than 1,300 retweets and 5,400 likes in 24 hours. Additionally, Twitter user @Habiba__Ogah tweeted, “When your mama sends you a howler : #BlackHogwarts.” The post (shown below, right) received more than 5,300 retweets and 17,000 likes in 24 hours.



    Later that evening, Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling responded to the hashtag. She tweeted,[9]“Seeing them and loving them. #BlackHogwarts.” Within 24 hours, the tweet (shown below) received more tahn 20,000 retweets and 67,000 likes.



    That night, Twitter[5] published a Moments page about the hashtag and several of the most popular posts.

    Several media outlets covered the popularity of the hashtag, including BuzzFeed, [6] HuffPost,[7] Uproxx[8] and more.

    Various Examples




    Search Interest

    Not Available.

    External References


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  • 01/16/18--01:28: Kero Kero Bonito


  • About

    Kero Kero Bonito (abbreviated as KKB) is a UK-based indie J-pop band, comprising of vocalist Sarah Midori Perry, and producers Gus Lobban & Jamie Bulled.

    Online History

    The band released their first single “Why Aren’t You Dancing” on April 17, 2013. They later released their debut mixtape Intro Bonito along with the music video for one of its songs “Homework” on July 20, 2013.




    On September 21, 2014, their song “Flamingo” was released on Ryan Hemsworth’s Secret Songs compilation shh#ffb6c1 via SoundCloud. Three day later, the song was uploaded on YouTube music channel Majestic Casual,[1] and later on the band’s official channel on February 1, 2016.[2] It is one of the band’s most popular songs, with over 2.21 million plays on SoundCloud, and 8.94 million total views from Majestic Casual’s the band’s official video (as of January 2018).[1][2]




    Their debut album Bonito Generation was released on October 21, 2016. The music video for one the album’s songs “Trampoline” was released four days later. As of January 2018, it is their most viewed music video, garnering more than 992,000 views.




    Reception

    The band has received positive reception, with their debut album having “generally favorable reviews” on Metacritic[3] and an average score of 3.39 (out of 5) on Rate Your Music.[4] Music reviewer Anthony Fantano gave Bonito Generation a “decent to strong 8 [out of 10]”, praising its cutesy tone and creative songs. The album also reached #13 in his top 50 albums of 2016.




    Fandom

    They have gained a cult following online, with over 35,000 likes on their Facebook page[5] and 47,600 followers on Soundcloud.[6] There are also several posts related to them on sites like Tumblr[7] and /mu/. [8] The band is often associated with the rap trio Death Grips by fans of both performers, and has also been referenced by KKB themselves.[9] One of the members, Jamie, is a fan of Detah Grips, and hopes for a collaboration.[10][11]




    Related Memes

    Flamingo Fan MVs

    Flamingo Fan MVs is a series of animated music videos of a character dancing to a sample of the song “Flamingo” by Kero Kero Bonito.




    NexGenCrusher / Crusherposting

    NexGenCrusher (also referred to as “Crusher”) is the online handle of Sarah’s boyfriend, known for his very sexual selfies and memes in Instagram and Twitter, in contrast to Sarah and KKB’s aesthetics. He is occasionally referenced in KKB related threads on 4chan’s /mu/ board.




    External References


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  • 01/16/18--05:57: Flamingo


  • About

    Flamingo is a series of animated dance videos that uses the song of the same name from indie J-pop band Kero Kero Bonito.

    Origin

    The song was released on Ryan Hemsworth’s Secret Songs compilation shh#ffb6c1 via SoundCloud. Three day later, the song was uploaded on YouTube music channel Majestic Casual,[1] and later in the band’s official channel on February 1, 2016.[2] It is one of the band’s most popular songs, with over 2.21 million plays on SoundCloud, and 8.94 million total views from Majestic Casual’s the band’s official video (as of January 2018).[1][2]




    Spread

    The earliest animated video was made by Gold Neko on October 14, 2016, and has gained more than 240,000 views. On February 1, 2017, Berd uploaded his version with the song in a lower pitch. As of January 2018, the video has over 6.9 millions views. Both videos feature their characters dancing with shrimps in the background, as a reference to the song’s lyrics.




    Notable Examples





    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    Scientifically Accurate Film Scenes refers to a copypasta which is typically used as a tongue-in-cheek title for various film scenes submitted to Reddit.

    Origin

    On January 15th, 2018, Redditor interlink_interlink submitted a clip of a nuclear explosion in the 1991 science fiction film Terminator 2: Judgement Day along with the claim that the scene was “still one of the most scientifically accurate nuclear detonation scenes in any media. Scientists wrote letters of praise to the film crew for the accuracy” (shown below). Over the next day, the post gathered upwards of 15,000 points (88% upvoted) and 2,600 comments on /r/videos.



    Spread

    That same day, Redditor ASCIO submitted a clip from the television show Star Trek titled “The Kirk vs. Gorn scene from Star Trek is still one of the most scientifically accurate humanoid reptilian scenes in any media. Scientists wrote letters of praise to the film crew for the accuracy” (shown below). Within 24 hours, the post gained over 48,200 points (72% upvoted) and 3,400 comments on /r/videos.[1]



    That evening, Redditor shavin_high submitted a post asking "What’s with all “Scientifically Accurate” Film Scene Posts on /r/videos?" to /r/OutOfTheLoop,[2] to which Redditor semsr cited the original Star Trek post. Over the next 24 hours, several other parody posts were made, which included the “Not the Bees” scene from 2006 horror film Wicker Man (shown below, left) and a “frisbee death scene” from the 1987 action thriller film Hard Ticket to Hawaii (shown below, right).[3][4] On January 16th, the news site RadioTimes[7] published an article about the copypasta titled “This new stupid film meme is one of the most scientifically accurate in any media.”



    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References


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  • 01/16/18--07:16: Nickthony Nametano


  • About

    Nickthony Nametano refers to a snowclone of Anthony Fantano’s name, often with names of musicians, memes, and other topics.

    Origin

    According to Fantano’s “Top 10 Fantano Memes,” its first appearance was during his early videos with comments such as “Anthony Fandango”.[1] His earliest use of the snowclone as introduction for his album reviews was on August 14, 2014, with the flashing text “GRANDTHONYPIANTANO” while he says his actual name (below, left). On his next review, he introduced himself as “ITHONYWONTWORKO(below, right).




    Spread

    His name has been remixed several times within his fanbase, along with compilations of his nickname introductions on YouTube. Fantano also sold limited-time t-shirts containing some of these nicknames via his support website.[2]




    Notable Examples





    External References


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    About

    Santa Ana Second Floor Car Crash refers to a vehicular accident that occurred in Santa Ana, California, in which an intoxicated driver hit a median, causing his car to go airborne and crash into the second floor of a dental office building. The resulting picture was joked about on Twitter in a similar vein as Bae Come Over jokes.

    Origin

    On January 14th, 2018, the Orange Country Fire Authority tweeted an image of a car lodged in the second floor of a dental office, gaining over 1,800 retweets and 3,500 likes.[1]



    The same day, Twitter user @KHOLMESlive tweeted video footage of the crash.




    Spread

    Shortly after the picture was posted to Twitter, users began making jokes about the image. Twitter user @livestrongfree[2] generated over 207,000 retweets and 464,000 likes quoting Molly Weasley from the Harry Potter film Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (shown below, left). Twitter user @KrangTNelson[3] did a Bae Come Over joke involving the Pee Tape and gained over 1,600 retweets and 11,000 likes (shown below, right).



    Other popular tweets using the “bae come over” joke include a tweet by @McJesse[4] that gained over 70 retweets and 580 likes (shown below, left) and a tweet by @Useronweed[5] that gained 14 retweets (shown below, right). While news outlets did not cover the spread of jokes, many publications covered the crash itself, including Uproxx,[6] the Los Angeles Times,[7] and Fox News.[8]



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References


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  • 01/16/18--08:48: Three Doors
  • About

    Three Doors is a two-pane captioned photo series in which a man in a suit strands before three doors in the first panel and kicks in door three in the second. The meme’s author labels each of the doors with door three being the least desired option in most cases.

    Origin

    The meme is the combination of two different image sources. The top image comes from the cover of the book The Lateral Lawyer: Opportunities and Pitfalls for the Law Firm Partner Switching Firms, which was published on November 7th, 2015 (shown below, left).[1] The second image is based on a Getty stock photograph of a man kicking in a door, which was taken by John Eder and submitted to Getty on September 2nd, 2005 (shown below, right).[2]



    Spread

    On January 9th, 2018, WorldStarHipHop posted a variation of The Lateral Lawyer cover on their social channels, Twitter[4] and Instagram. [5] In this version, they labeled each of the doors “Restart Life,” “$5 Billion” and “Power to Read Others Mind.” The image is captioned “Which one will you choose?” The post (shown below) received more 450 retweets, 2,100 likes and 580 comments on Twitter and 311,000 likes on Instagram in six days.



    On January 15th, 2018, Redditor[3] ScarySkeleton24 posted a meme that combines both images in the /r/dankmemes subreddit. In this version, the man is looking at three doors labeled 1. Somebody touched my Spaget, 2. Tide PODS and 3. Ugandan Knuckles. The man is label “Normies”. In the bottom panel, the man label “Normies” is shown kicking in door three, asserting that Normies love Ugandan Knuckles. Within 24 hours, the post (shown below, left) has received more than 4,400 points (92% upvoted) and 140 comments.

    Shortly after the initial post was made, more members of /r/dankmemes posted variations (examples below, center and right, respectively. The common theme within the series is “normies” infiltrating the meme community and potentially overusing specific, popular memes.


    !

    Various Examples




    Search Interest

    Not Available.

    External Reference


    0 0
  • 01/16/18--11:11: Woah Vicky
  • About

    Woah Vicky is the online handle of teenage social media personality Victoria Waldrip. Online, Waldrip has been widely compared to Danielle Bregoli and accused of cultural appropriation, leading her to make the controversial claim that she considers herself a part of the Black race.

    Online History

    On July 4th, 2016, Waldrip created the @imwoahvicky[1] Instagram feed, which gathered upwards of 1.3 million followers over the next two years. On May 21st, 2017, Waldrip uploaded the first video to her Woahh Vicky YouTube channel titled “The Lotion Challenge,” in which she eats a spoonful of lotion with a friend (shown below). In August, she created the @imwoahvicky[2] Twitter feed.



    Controversies

    Feuds

    In mid-August 2017, Waldrip released a diss track targeting YouTuber RiceGum. While the original upload has since been removed, a mirror was subsequently uploaded by YouTuber thot (shown below).



    On August 18th, RiceGum uploaded a video reacting to the diss track titled “This girl must be stopped,” (shown below, left). On October 1st, the YouTuber Face Reveals channel uploaded footage of Bregoli reacting to the RiceGum diss track (shown below, right).



    On July 12th, YouTuber 1600quickkick uploaded footage of Waldrip and Bregoli engaging in an argument over FaceTime chat (shown below, left). On July 15th, YouTuber DomisLive NEWS uploaded a video discussing a feud between Bregoli and Waldrip which garnered upwards of 1.4 million views and 5,300 comments in six months (shown below, right).



    Racial Identity

    On July 22nd, 2017, Waldrip uploaded a video in which she claimed she was 25% Black based on DNA test results from the website Ancestry.com and claimed she identified as a “Black girl” (shown below). Within six months, the video received more than 2.4 million views.



    On September 9th, YouTuber Triggered Tro uploaded a video titled “Colorblind White Girls Thinks She’s Black,” which gained over 1.9 million views and 5,500 comments within four months (shown below, left).

    On December 26th, YouTuber Benji uploaded a video titled “Woah Vicky Talks Normally,” which mocks Waldrip’s use of African American Vernacular English (AAVE) (shown below, right). Within one month, the video received upwards of 4.8 million views and 9,000 comments.



    On January 14th, 2018, YouTuber Triggered Tro released a followup video titled “WoahVicky Admits She’s White,” which accumulated more than 631,000 views and 6,300 comments over the next 48 hours (shown below).



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Instagram – “imwoahvicky”:

    [2]Twitter – @imwoahvicky

    [3]


    0 0
  • 01/16/18--11:15: This VR Is So Realistic
  • About

    This VR Is So Realistic refers to an exploitablewebcomic in which a person puts on a VR machine and says “This VR is so realistic!” We then see what the person is looking at, and in the fourth panel, the person is seen crying. What the person sees is changed in the variations.

    Origin

    On August 7th, 2017, webcomic artist Lemon Sandwich uploaded the original comic to their Facebook page (shown below).[1] In the original comic, the person sees their bank account, which is in negative numbers. The post gained 5,700 likes and reactions.



    Spread

    Shortly after the comic was posted, it was turned into an exploitable. One of the early variations, posted to /r/dankmemes on September 2nd, 2017[2] made a joke about Traps that gained over 1,200 upvotes (shown below, left). A version which made an Earth is Flat joke, appeared on /r/memeeconomy on September 1st.[3]



    On November 30th, 2017, the original comic was posted to the Facebook page See More[4] and gained 17,000 likes and reactions. Exploitable variations of the comic continued to appear over the course of the following months. On January 16th, 2018, a wholesome variation was posted to the Twitter account @RespectfulMemes,[5] gaining 800 retweets 3,200 likes (shown below, left). Another variation posted to /r/TooMeIrlForMeIrl[6] was uploaded on the same day (shown below, left).



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References

    [1]Facebook – Lemon Sandwich

    [2]/r/dankmemes – Traps Are GAY!

    [3]/r/memeeconomy – Just Invested In This Format

    [4]Facebook – See More

    [5]Twitter – @RespectfulMemes

    [6]Reddit – Life’s a Game


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