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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 01/11/18--07:30: Priced Out of Dublin
  • About

    “Priced Out of Dublin” is a phrasal template based on a headline from the Irish Times newspaper about rising prices in Dublin. Online, users have taken the headline’s format, “Priced Out of X? Consider Y” to express other humorous alternatives to living in an expensive city.

    Origin

    On January 6th, 2018, the Irish Times[1] newspaper published an article entitled “Priced out of Dublin? Consider Gorey.” Two days later, Twitter[2] user @conoraon posted a screenshot of the article and wrote, "I see we’ve arrived at at the “Priced out of Dublin? Move 100km away from Dublin!” stage of the Irish Times’ property coverage." The post (shown below) received more than 260 retweets and 1,000 likes in three days." In addition, they incliude



    Spread

    Shortly after @conoraon made their inital tweet, more users began posting variations on the template. Twitter[3] user @bearaboi tweeted, “Priced out of Dublin? Hyper-space jump to a distant star system! Its central core sun is buzzing with energy, there’s easy access to schools, and plenty of property options to refashion a new civilization.” Additionally, they included a gif from the science ficition television series Battlestar Galactica. The post (shown below) received more than 70 retweets and 430 likes in three days.

    More users coupled the template with scenes and jokes from the animated sitcom The Simpsons (examples below, center and right).

    The following day, Twitter[4] published a Moments page about the popularity of the template.



    Various Examples




    Search Interest

    Not Available.

    External References


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  • 01/11/18--08:28: Chibi-Robo!
  • About

    Chibi-Robo! is a platforming video game developed by Skip Ltd. and published by Nintendo. In the game, the player plays as the titular character Chibi-Robo, a small robot for the Sanderson family, who collects “happy points” by solving dilemmas for the family and other living toys and objects in the household. Each action by Chibi-Robo uses its battery life, requiring the player to charge at one of the household’s electrical outlets.

    History

    Chibi-Robo! was initially conceived as a point-and-click game in 2003.[1] When the game was put on hold, Nintendo prorducer Shigeru Miyamoto took interest in the character and signed on as senior producer for Chibi-Robo!, and the core gameplay was changed. Chibi Robo! was released on June 23rd, 2005 in Japan and in North America on February 8th, 2006.



    The game had several sequels, including _Chibi-Robo!: Park Patrol (2007) and Okaeri! Chibi-Robo! Happy Richie Ōsōji! released for the Nintendo DS, and Chibi-Robo! Photo Finder (2013) and Chibi-Robo! Zip Lash (2015) for the Nintendo 3DS. A remake of the original was released for the Wii in January of 2009.

    Reception

    The game received generally positive reviews upon release, compiling a score of 75/100 on review-aggregate site Metacritic.[2] Critics praised the game’s charming presentation and characters as well as the intricate plot which featured some surprisingly adult themes such as divorce. They were more divided on gameplay, as some found the charging feature to be frustrating while others felt it added to the experience. The game’s graphical presentation was also criticized.

    Online Presence

    Online, Chibi-Robo! has a small but devoted following. There is a small subreddit for the game with 238 readers.[3] On YouTube, the game is discussed as one of Nintendo’s lesser-known and imperfect but beloved titled. For example, YouTuber yakkocmn posted a video introducing the game to his audience in April of 2017, gaining over 47,000 views (shown below, left). YouTuber Haedox reviewed the game’s history in October of 2015, gaining over 60,000 views (shown below, right).



    Nintendo’s Chibi-Robo On Fire Tweet

    On January 10th, 2018, Nintendo tweeted an image of Chibi-Robo on fire, gaining over 15,000 retweets and 48,000 likes (shown below).[4]



    The tweet came after several tweets in which it appeared as though Nintendo were teasing something coming, making fans expect a Nintendo Direct announcement, a semi-regular practice by Nintendo in which they announce upcoming games and surprises.[5] Though there were several tweets by Nintendo in which they seemed to be toying with their audience’s expectations, the image of Chibi-Robo on fire gained the most attention. On /r/Nintendo, a thread about the image gained over 7,700 upvotes.[6] A thread on ResetEra[7] speculating about the Nintendo Direct announcement generated over 600 pages and several photoshops inserting Chibi-Robo on fire into various images (shown below).


    Nintendo Direct RestetEra Thread

    Meanwhile, other video game brands tweeted back at Nintendo’s Chibi-Robo on fire tweet with several of their own characters on fire. For example, the Sonic the Hedgehog Twitter account tweeted to Nintendo a picture of Blaze the Cat, gaining over 2,400 retweets and 12,000 likes (shown below, left). The Mega Man twitter account tweeted a picture of the character Fire Man, gaining similar numbers (shown below, right). When the Nintendo Direct announcement did occur, there was no mention of Chibi-Robo.[8]



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/11/18--09:39: Stock Photo Backstabber
  • About

    Stock Photo Backstabber is a captioned stock photo series in which a man in a suit shakes hands with a woman while a person dressed as a shadow holds a knife to her back.

    Origin

    On August 24th, 2017, the Twitter[1] account @darkstockphotos posted a stock image by Troy Aossey[2] of a man shaking hands with a woman as a person dressed as shadow holds a knife to her back. The tweet (shown below) received more than 875 retweets and 2,200 likes in five months.



    Spread

    Various Examples

    Search Interest

    Not Available.

    External References


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  • 01/11/18--10:22: Hurra Torpedo
  • Hurra Torpedo is a band from Norway that plays songs using kitchen appliances alongside more traditional instruments. They were formed in the early nineties, are part of the artistic collective Duplex Records, and all members of the band also play in a variety of other bands in Norway.

    During recent years Hurra Torpedo have had annual split- and reunion tours. The band struck international fame when a television performance of the 1983 Bonnie Tyler power ballad “Total Eclipse of the Heart”, using kitchen appliances for percussion, spread as an internet meme. The clip, from a Norwegian comedy-variety show called Lille lørdag (“Little Saturday”) (aired on Wednesdays – “the Little Saturday” in the Scandinavian week), was filmed in 1995. In early 2005 the clip was uploaded to the internet.

    In the clip, the band, dressed in ill-fitting jogging suits, play on a stage surrounded by various kitchen appliances, such as electric kitchen stoves and chest-freezers. Frontman Hegerberg plays guitar and sings in a deliberately off-key monotone and with a strong Norwegian accent, Schau “drums” by hitting a stove with a stick and slamming the door of a chest-freezer, while Guttormsgaard adds backing vocals, and at the climax smashes the top of an electrical stove with a cement press, more or less, to the beat of the song.

    In October/November 2005 they became part of a viral ad campaign by going on a coast to coast tour in the U.S. that was paid for by Ford in order to promote the Ford Fusion car. As part of the ad campaign, a mockumentary movie called “The Crushing Blow” was being made, said to have been directed by the “character” Pip Simon who is played by the actress Tara Copeland while in reality it was directed by Joey Garfield.

    By the end of November 2005 a clip from The Crushing Blow was viewed more than 500,000 times in a couple of days from the web site iFilm, and some of the clips spread around blog sites.

    The band played several gigs in Norway the first half of 2006, and the Garorock festival in Marmande, France, with approximately 5000 in the audience.

    Hurra Torpedo had two showcases at the 2006 South by Southwest festival, and in June they went on new US Tour, starting in Boston, ending in San Francisco three weeks later. Along this tour they played to an enthused audience at the Wakarusa Music and Camping Festival in Lawrence, Kansas. This tour has no connection with Ford.

    In 2011, the band recorded the soundtrack for Christmas advertising campaign of Czech household appliance retailer Okay.


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  • 01/11/18--12:07: New Funky Mode
  • About

    New Funky Mode, sometimes stylized as Funky New Mode, refers to a series of photoshopped video game covers that advertise a “New Funky Mode.” The images are made in parody of the upcoming rerelease of the Donkey Kong game Donkey Kong Country: Tropical Freeze for the Nintendo Switch. The box art for the game promises a “New Funky Mode.” The images are made in a similar fashion to & Knuckles and Featuring Dante From The Devil May Cry Series.

    Origin

    On January 11th, 2018, Nintendo released a Nintendo Direct video advertising new games, rereleases, and ports for the Nintendo Switch. Included in the video was an announcement for the Switch release of Donkey Kong Country: Tropical Freeze, which will add Donkey Kong character Funky Kong.



    The same day, Nintendo released the box art for the Switch release of the game. The box art features a small tag in the upper-right hand corner which says “New Funky Mode” (shown below).[1]


    {width:425px}

    Spread

    Various Examples

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/11/18--12:18: Funky New Mode
  • Origin

    On December, 11, 2018 the Nintendo Direct Mini featured some games, this includes Donkey Kong Country Tropical Freeze, an port from the WII U. The box art for the game was showed soon after the Direct. [Here]

    Spread

    Soon after the box art was revealed a tweet showed the Dark Souls Remaster box art with the text “Funky New Mode” and Funky Kong include on the top right of the box art

    After a few hours other people started doing the same thing to other box arts.


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  • 01/10/18--06:12: Ken Ashcorp


  • About

    Ken Ashcorp is a singer/songwriter who makes music about popular internet tropes in video games, anime, and cartoons.

    Online History

    His first song “I Wish There Were Still Dinosaurs” was uploaded on November 18, 2010. On the same day, he uploaded his second song “Vuvu Hero,” which was based on a game of the same name.[1]



    Since then, Ken has released 29 songs on his YouTube channel,[2] along with 21 singles on his Apple Music[3] and Bandcamp pages.[4] One of his songs “Absolute Territory,” which revolves around the Japanese concept of Zettai Ryouiki, is the most popular on his channel with over 9.7 million views. His next most popular song “20% Cooler” is a reference to a quote by Rainbow Dash(see entry here), and currently has more than 6.3 million views.



    On May 25, 2016, he announced his first live show with Mystery Skulls as the headline act. He performed in Anime Expo on July 1, 2016.



    Fandom

    His channel has a large following online, with currently over 267,000 subscribers,[2] and more than 19,000 likes on his official Facebook page.[5] His fan subreddit, /r/KenAshcorp, has 593 readers.[6] His songs have also received many remixes and mashups.



    Kenny

    Kenny is an anthropomorphic panda who serves as the channel’s mascot. She appears in all of his album art, thumbnails, and Ken’s profile pictures. There have been several fan arts of her, with more than 1,100 results in DeviantArt.



    Reputation

    Ken keeps most of his peronal life and other details private, as he doesn’t share them online. Prior to his main channel, he uploaded songs to his former channel foreverpandering, but was later deleted due to many criticisms of being in the furry fandom. This also caused him to close comments on some of his videos, as well as locking his own accounts.[7] Various songs from this channel were reuploaded on YouTube. Compared to his main channel, his older content was less professional, but more mainstream.



    Notable Videos




    Search Interests

    External References

    [1]Newgrounds – Vuvu Hero

    [2]YouTube – Ken Ashcorp

    [3]Apple Music – Ken Ashcorp

    [4]Bandcamp – Music | Ken Ashcorp

    [5]Facebook – Ken Ashcorp

    [6]Reddit – /r/KenAshcorp

    [7]TV Tropes – Ken Ashcorp


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  • 01/11/18--13:31: Olivier Delemme
  • Olivier Delemme was a french guy wich was popular for his appearance in What the Cut episode 5, he sing a cover of a song by the italien singer Eros Rasmazotti with pretty bad voice skills.

    WHATTHECUT #5 (RE-UPLOAD) – SEDUCTEUR, CHANTEUR ET PUBLICITÉ :

    https://youtu.be/R2e3hu282AI

    The video :

    https://youtu.be/BfX4CCTH64k


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  • 01/11/18--14:46: LegalFling
  • About

    LegalFling is an application that uses block chain technology to allow sexual partners to give consent on a public digital ledger. Online, many reacted negatively to the idea of a “blanket” consent form, arguing that consent “is something that occurs continually throughout a sexual encounter.”

    History

    LegalFling was created by the block chain LegalThings, a company that generates live contracts, a digital contracts platform. In January 2018, LegalThings announced LegalFling, a live contract app specifically sexual encounters.

    Search Interest


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  • 01/11/18--15:26: Caramelldancen
  • About

    Carmelldancen was a dance craze popular in the otaku community from 2004 to 2008. The dance craze originated in japan from a looped clip of the opening to the anime Popotan. It was soon combined with the song Carmelldancen in a flash loop and people were frequently gathering together at anime and manga conventions to do the dance to the song, the unofficial dance even became so popular the artist released an official music video containing CG characters performing a more complex version of the dance.

    Animation Loop


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  • 01/11/18--16:21: noritos

  • Noritos was created during a voice call on discord when EMTProject mispronounced dorito and instead said norito after making fun of it enough he decided to create Noritos in photoshop


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  • 01/11/18--16:43: DJ toaster

  • DJ toaster in someone on discord that is very annoying to the point that he gets banned and tries his best to get back only to give up. he then proceeds to make his on server and continues to be terrible


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    About

    Kids Describe God to an Illustrator is a series of exploitable images based on a viral video in which kids tell an illustrator what they believe God’s appearance to be and the illustrator sketches their description. Online, people photoshop images of different cultural figures over the illustrator’s work for humorous effect.

    Origin

    On April 21st, 2017, the YouTube[1] account Cut published a video entitled “Kids Describe God to an Illustrator.” The video (shown below) features a series of children envisioning God’s appearance, telling an illustrator and having the artist draw their descriptions. As of January 2018, the video has received more than 7 millions views.



    The earliest iteration of the video being used as an exploitable occurred on April 22nd. That day, Redditor[2] LuxurySpaVirtual posted a moment from the video with Daniel from the Damn Daniel viral video as the illustration (shown below) in the /r/dank_meme subreddit.[2]



    Spread

    Three days later, on April 25th, Instagram user @leagueofnicolai posted to variations of the meme featuring League of Legends players Tyler1 and Faker (shown below, left and center, resepectively. The second, featuring Faker, received more than 400 likes as of January 2018.[3][4]

    Four months later on August 9th, Redditor ZajdiPaji posted a variation featuring Filthy Frank. Within five months, the post (shown below, right) received more tahn 220 points (91% upvoted).



    Various Examples




    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/10/18--06:12: Ken Ashcorp


  • About

    Ken Ashcorp is a singer/songwriter who makes music about popular internet tropes in video games, anime, and cartoons.

    Online History

    His first song “I Wish There Were Still Dinosaurs” was uploaded on November 18, 2010. On the same day, he uploaded his second song “Vuvu Hero,” which was based on a game of the same name.[1]



    Since then, Ken has released 29 songs on his YouTube channel,[2] along with 21 singles on his Apple Music[3] and Bandcamp pages.[4] One of his songs “Absolute Territory,” which revolves around the Japanese concept of Zettai Ryouiki, is the most popular on his channel with over 9.7 million views. His next most popular song “20% Cooler” is a reference to a quote by Rainbow Dash(see entry here), and currently has more than 6.3 million views.



    On May 25, 2016, he announced his first live show with Mystery Skulls as the headline act. He performed in Anime Expo on July 1, 2016.



    Fandom

    His channel has a large following online, with currently over 267,000 subscribers,[2] and more than 19,000 likes on his official Facebook page.[5] His fan subreddit, /r/KenAshcorp, has 593 readers.[6] His songs have also received many remixes and mashups.



    Kenny

    Kenny is an anthropomorphic panda who serves as the channel’s mascot. She appears in all of his album art, thumbnails, and Ken’s profile pictures. There have been several fan arts of her, with more than 1,100 results in DeviantArt.



    Reputation

    Ken keeps most of his peronal life and other details private, as he doesn’t share them online. Prior to his main channel, he uploaded songs to his former channel foreverpandering, but was later deleted due to many criticisms of being in the furry fandom. This also caused him to close comments on some of his videos, as well as locking his own accounts.[7] Various songs from this channel were reuploaded on YouTube. Compared to his main channel, his older content was less professional, but more mainstream.



    Notable Videos




    Search Interests

    External References

    [1]Newgrounds – Vuvu Hero

    [2]YouTube – Ken Ashcorp

    [3]Apple Music – Ken Ashcorp

    [4]Bandcamp – Music | Ken Ashcorp

    [5]Facebook – Ken Ashcorp

    [6]Reddit – /r/KenAshcorp

    [7]TV Tropes – Ken Ashcorp


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  • 01/10/18--07:54: But Can You Do This?
  • About

    “But Can You Do This?” is a memorable quote uttered by YouTuber PewDiePie when joking about the reclining capabilities of a PewDiePie Edition gaming chair released by the company Clutch Chairz. Online, the quote has often been used as an in-joke among fans to mock the chair’s expensive price point.

    Origin

    The chair was PewDiePie’s idea and was created in collaboration with Clutch Chairz.[1] One of the earliest times PewDiePie talked about his chair’s reclining abilities was in his video “WE CANTLETJAKEPAULBEAT ME! – LWIAY– #0012” posted on November 14th, 2017. PewDiePie said the line in response to a fan’s image making fun of the price of his chair (shown below).



    Spread

    Roughly a month after PewDiePie first said the line, he repeated it in his video “The REAL reason I wasnt in YouTube Rewind” (shown below), posted December 11th, 2017. He began repeating it in videos afterwards.



    Following that video, the moment began being used in various remixes posted to YouTube. On December 22nd, YouTuber Ultim3te Highlights posted an edited version of PewDiePie saying the line (shown below, left). On January 9th, 2018, YouTuber Day By Dave posted a musical remix of PewDiePie saying the line (shown below, right).



    “Image macros:”/memes/image-macros and photoshops of the line also began appearing online. For example, on January 7th, 2018, Redditor KeWirth uploaded an image fusing the line with Somebody Toucha My Spaghet to /r/pewdiepiesubmissions, gaining over 1,800 upvotes (shown below, left). An image uploaded by kartik727 to the subreddit gained over 1,600 upvotes (shown below, right).



    Various Examples


    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]PewDiePie Edition Throttle Series":https://usa.clutchchairz.com/product/pewdiepie-edition-throttle-series/


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  • 01/10/18--07:54: Adam the Creator
  • About

    Adam the Creator is the internet alias of Adam Badilla, a brand strategist, marketer, original meme creator and artist.

    Online History

    On June 9th, 2014, Adam Badilla, a brand strategist living in New York City, New York posted the first entry of a year long project to post a new, original sketch every day on his personal Instagram[1] page. The first sketch, which featured a man eating a woman’s body, received more than 15 likes. Several days later, he posted it on his alternate account @adam.the.creator,[2] where the post (shown below) received more than 100 likes.



    Over the next two years, he continued to post sketches of various cultural figures and memes, such as Heath Ledger’s the Joker (shown below, left)[4] The following year, on January 27th, 2015, he announced that he had received more 7,500 followers (shown below, center).[5] On February 9th, 2016, he posted a sketch of crying Michael Jordan, which received more than 1,200 likes in two years (shown below, right).[3]



    On June 24th, 2016, Padilla posted one of his first memes, which he would eventually transition his main focus toward. In an Instagram[6] post, he superimposed a picture of then-presidential candidate Donald Trump onto a Burger King Mac and Cheetos food item. The post (shown below) received more than 1,300 likes in a year and a half.



    Several months later, he posted a parody Fisher-Price toy for called “Toddler’s Happy Hour Playset.” Within one year, the post (shown below), received more than 4,000 likes.[9] However, because some thought the toy was real, Fisher-Price mad a statement. They said,[10]“Fisher-Price even issued a release that recognized the humor and assured parents that they are not involved in the parody.”



    On December 31st, 2017, Padilla began posting sections of a collage he had made featuring the memes of 2017. These included references to Salt Bae, The Ting Goes,Cash Me Ousside,the Weinstein Effect and more. The final section received more than 17,000 likes in less than two weeks on Instagram.[7] (entire collage shown below).



    Reputation

    Padilla is known as a successful brand strategist, who has consulted for celebrities, startups and Fortune 500 luxury brands. In 2016, Business Insider named him one of the 29 best people in advertising to follow on Instagram.[8]

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/10/18--09:42: Bad Teacher
  • About

    Bad Teacher refers to a snowclone spread on Twitter in which an initially unidentified speaker offers to teach a lesson on a certain topic. Then, experts in that topic respond with nervous actions. The punchline is the reveal of who is teaching the lesson.

    Origin

    On December 31st, 2017, Twitter user @holiday805[1] wrote the first variation of the meme, using memebers of the K-pop girl group Girls’ Generation, gaining over 280 retweets and 480 likes (shown below).



    Spread

    Later that day, Twitter user @itaeye[2] uploaded a more popular variation featuring other K-pop stars, gaining over 1,500 retweets and 2,600 likes (shown below, left). Over the following week, the tweet expanded into other fandoms, and generally followed a formula wherein the one promoting a lesson would be a humorous example of someone who did not know the topic at hand. For example, a popular example tweeted by @yomiadegoke[3] referenced Big Shaq teaching math, gaining over 1,100 retweets and 1,600 likes (shown below, right).



    Other variations on the tweet used the format to make more sincere fandom-based points. For example, Twitter user @Track9__[4] uploaded a joke about the successful albums of Lorde and Taylor Swift, gaining over 270 retweets (shown below, left). A fan account of actor Timothy Chamelée used the format to praise the actor, gaining over 40 retweets and 160 likes (shown below, right).[5] The tweets were covered by Daily Dot.[6]



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References


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    Overview

    Donald Trump’s “Shithole” Comments refer to United States President Donald Trump’s assertion that Haiti, El Salvador and African countries are “shithole countries.” The reaction to President Trump’s remarks were largely negative, from the public, the media, law makers and world leaders.

    Background

    On September 5th, 2017, United States Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that the president would be rescinding the Obama-era DACA program, which protects undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children, known as Dreamers, from deportation.[1] This gave congress until March 5th, 2018 to legalize DACA or else those protections would be lifted. Over the next few months, DACA was used as part of negotiatians for such immigration policies as border security and the Trump-proposed Mexican border wall.

    During such negotiatians on January 12th, 2018, President Trump invited representatives from congress to discuss a bipartisan immigration deal. When the prospect of protecting immigrants from Haiti, El Salvador and African countries, the president reportedly said, “Why are we having all these people from shithole countries come here?”[2]

    According to people familiar with the meeting, Trump continued that the U.S. should bring in more immigrants from countries, like Norway, before saying, “Why do we need more Haitians? Take them out.”

    Development

    Online Reaction

    Following Trump’s remarks, many online denounced his assertion to that those countries are “shitholes.” On Twitter, many people said that this was another example of President Trump’s perceived attitudes towards non-white people (examples below). Some went on to say, “Trump is a racist.”



    That day, Redditor[3] xxxDubsxxx posted a video in the /r/PublicFreakout subreddit of former CIA counterterrorism official Philip Mudd denouncing the president’s comments, stating that this type of hostility toward immigrants is something that his family dealt with as Italian and Irish immigrants in the early 20th century. The post received more than 60,000 points (80% upvoted) and 7,700 comments in 15 hours. The video (shown below) was also shared by Redditor[4] DestinyPvEGal in the /r/MurderedByWords subreddit, where it received more than 19,000 points (81% upvoted) and 1,800 comments in 12 hours.



    Trump’s comments made the frontpage of several other subreddits. Redditor[5] billndotnet’s thread on the comments in the /r/politics subreddit received more than 56,000 points (85% upvoted) and 14,000 comments. Redditor pipsdontsqueak’s thread in the /r/worldnews subreddit received more than 60,000 points (76% upvoted) and 13,000 comments in 18 hours.

    Media Coverage

    Virtually every major news outlet covered Trump’s comments, including CNN,[7] The New York Times[8] Uproxx[9] and more.

    For their January 12th cover, the New York Daily News[12] put an image of Donald Trump as a poop emoji on the cover with the headline “S**T FORBRAINS: Trump spews vicious slur against immigrants.”



    “The President of the United States is Racist”

    That night, CNN anchor Don Lemon opened the show he hosts, CNN Tonight, by saying “The President of the United States is racist.”[10] The comments went viral and were discussed at length on social media. Twitter[11] published a Moments page regarding the response to Lemon’s broadcast.



    Haitian Response

    That night, former Haitian Prime Minister Laurent Lamothe tweeted, “The world is witnessing a new low today with this #ShitholeNations remark! totally unacceptable! uncalled for moreover it shows a lack a respect and IGNORANCE never seen before in the recent history of the US by any President! Enough is enough!!” The post (shown below) received more than 1,900 retweets and 4,500 likes in less than 24 hours.



    Trump’s Denial

    On January 12th, President Trump denied making such remarks. He tweeted,[13]“The language used by me at the DACA meeting was tough, but this was not the language used. What was really tough was the outlandish proposal made – a big setback for DACA!” The post (shown below) received more than 12,000 retweets and 48,000 likes in less than six hours.



    Following Trump’s denial, Senator Richard J. Durbin of Illinois who attended the meeting said that thre president not only used the term, but also said it “repeatedly, during the course of the meeting on immigration,” according to the New York Times.[14] Of Trump’s denial, Durbin said, “It’s not true. He said these hate-filled things and he said them repeatedly.”

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/12/18--07:52: 9gag's Meme Monument
  • Overview

    9gag’s Meme Monument, also known as #FunLegacy, is a 24-ton slab of stone engraved with various internet memes created by 9gag in honor of the internet humor site’s ninth anniversary. The monument has been widely mocked online, leading to the creation of operation “#SmashTheStone” to organize the slab’s destruction.

    Background

    On April 25th, 2017, the 9gag TV channel uploaded a video titled “The Time Has Come. The First Man-Made Monument To Humor Is Here #FunLegacy,” which unveiled the stone slab which had been etched with images submitted by the 9gag userbase (shown below). Within eight months, the video accumulated upwards of 300,000 views and 360 comments.



    Developments

    News Media Coverage

    On May 2nd, 2017, the advertising news blog Campaign published an

    #SmashTheStone

    On January 11th, 2018, YouTuber Internet Historian uploaded a video titled “9gag’s Meme Rock | #SmashTheStone,” which received upwards of 307,000 views and 3,500 comments over the next 24 hours (shown below).



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/12/18--08:22: Shitty Men In Media List
  • Overview

    Shitty Men In Media List refers to a Google document shared amongst women in the media industry intended to help protect women against certain peers in their industry by naming men accused of sexual misconduct ranging from creepy behavior in direct messages to rape. Once knowledge of the list became public, as well as several names on the list, it generated controversy as many of the claims had been unsubstantiated and jeopardized the reputation of some men who were accused of lesser charges. After rumors circulated that Harper’s Bazaar was about to publish a piece on the list outing the creator, the creator of the list, Moira Donegan, stepped forward.

    Background

    On October 12th, 2017, Buzzfeed[1] published an article about the list which began circulating the evening prior. The sheet spread after the allegations against Harvey Weinstein had begun circulating. Writing for Buzzfeed, Doree Shafrir noted that the list included both men with allegations of unwanted flirtation and men with allegations of sexual assault and violence. She also wrote that while she was excited that men in the media industry with histories of bad behavior were being acknowledged and warned about, an anonymous spreadsheet lumping lesser, unwanted sexual advances with assault and rape may cause problems. She points to a tweet by Collier Meyerson of The Nation which read:

    “There is a difference between serial sexual assaulters, harassers, rapists and dogs. There are tons of both in media. In the coming days, as aggregated lists of men are created, it’s important to distinguish who are dogs and who are sexual assaulters.”

    Developments

    Shortly after Buzzfeed’s article was posted, the list was locked and then deleted. Nevertheless, screenshots had been taken and began to circulate online. The idea of the list was debated online as many shared Shafrir’s misgivings about the potential of such a list. Jill Filipovic for NBC[2] wrote the list was a "radical if enormously flawed feminist effort,” and would lead to backlash. Writing for Slate,[3] Christina Caterucci echoed some misgivings about the list, saying:

    “It makes sense not to hire rapists, but should every man who’s ever verbally harassed a woman never work again? What about ‘creeps’? For those of us who believe that the prison system and sex offender registries do far more harm than good, what alternatives can we offer survivors and perpetrators? At what point could an industry consider a harasser reformed and hirable? How can women protect one another without trampling the rights of the accused?”

    The New Yorker’s Masha Gessen critiqued the list by claiming it was a step in a sex panic akin to a witch hunt.[4] Erin Gloria Ryan of the Daily Beast[5] claimed the list achieved neither justice nor catharsis, and was a “shitty way” of going about changing the media.

    Meanwhile, /pol/[6] posted screenshots of the list two weeks after Buzzfeed’s story.

    Search Interest

    External References


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