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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 01/04/18--10:56: Matt the Radar Technician
  • About

    Matt the Radar Technician is a character from the Saturday Night Live“Star Wars Undercover Boss: Starkiller Base.” In a parody of reality television series Undercover Boss, Adam Driver plays the character Kylo Ren from the 2016 science fiction space opera film Star Wars: The Force Awakens going undercover at Starkiller Base to learn what his employees think of him.

    Origin

    On January 16th, 2016, Saturday Night Live[1] aired a sketch parody of the television series Undercover Boss starring actor Adam Driver. In the sketch, Driver plays Kylo Ren from Star Wars: The Force Awakens dressed up as Matt the Radar Technician. During Ren’s attempts to see what his employees think of Kylo Ren, he accidentally outs himself as the villain. Within two years of the video being uploaded to YouTube, the sketch (shown below) has been viewed more than 29 million times.



    Spread

    Action Figures

    Shortly after the episode aired, fans began posting custom made action figures of the character. As early as January 19th, custom toy creator Jim Heston built and briefly sold a Matt the Radar Technician action figure on his Etsy story “Toy Addicts.”[2] That day, Imgur[3] user JasonWelcome posted a picture of the figure (shown below, left) and received more than 2,300 points and 198,000 views in two years. On January 22nd, Instagram[4] user @huedaws posted a custom Funko Pop action figure of Matt. The post (shown below, center) received more than 540 likes in two years.

    The following month, Redditor[6] posted a picture of a Matt figurine in the /r/StarWars subreddit. The post (shown below, right) received more than 7,400 points (90% upvoted) and 200 comments before archiving.



    Image Macros

    Shortly after the episode aired, people using shots of the sketch for image macros. In February 2016, Imgflip[15] user KatrinaRen posted an image macro of Matt with the caption “Hi, my name is Matt, I’m a radar technician / Tell that to Kanjiklub.” The post (shown below, left) received more than 2,700 views. Later that year, Imgflip[16] user DebRogers posted one that reads “Radar Technician Matt approves this message.” The post (shown below, right) receied more than 1,000 views as of January 2018.



    Fandom

    Shortly after the character appeared on Saturday Night Live the Tumblr[7] account matt-the-radar-technician launched. The account has been posting since January 16th, 2016 and continues to update. The account generally posts gifs from the sketch as well as posts from the perspective of Matt.

    Battlefront II Mod

    On December 31st, 2017, Nexus Mods[13] released a Matt – Radar Technician mod for the game Star Wars: Battlefront II, allowing users to download and play as the character in the game.

    That day, YouTuber[7] DarthVaderModding uploaded a video of Matt the Radar Technician as a playable character in the game Star Wars: Battlefront II. The video (shown below, left) received more than 8,000 views in one week.

    Several days later, the account uploaded an updated version of the mod (shown below, right).


    On January 1st, 2018, the YouTube[9] account Star Wars HQ uploaded another mod of Matt in Battlefront II. The video (shown below) received more than 100,000 views in less than five days.

    Several media outlets covered the mod, including Kotaku, [10] PC Mag,[11] Polygon[12] and more.

    On January 3rd, Twitter[14] published a Moments page about the mod.



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/08/18--07:49: Absolute Unit
  • About

    Absolute Unit refers to jokes made on Twitter in which people caption images of large objects or people with a variation on the phrase, “In awe at the size of this lad. Absolute unit.”

    Origin

    On December 13th, 2017, Twitter user @mrreptoid[1] uploaded a picture of British hotelier David Morgan-Hewitt posing with the Queen of England. He captioned the photo “In awe at the size of this lad. Absolute unit,” referring to Morgan-Hewitt. “Absolute” is a British slang term used in so-called “lad culture” to mean “very” (i.e. Absolute Madman). The tweet gained over 3,500 retweets and 13,000 likes (shown below).



    Spread

    The phrase began seeing use as a caption to pictures of various other large objects and people in the following days. Most notably, it was used by journalist David Roth on December 22nd[2] to describe Wyatt Koch after video of him advertising his brand of shirts went viral. Roth’s tweet gained over 810 retweets and 2,500 likes.



    By the beginning of 2018, the phrase began seeing use in a number of popular tweets. For example, on January 2nd, 2018, Twitter user @baucesauce[3] used it to describe a large Pikachu stuffed animal, gaining over 5,000 retweets and 18,000 likes (shown below, left). On January 5th, user @Papapishu[4] used the phrase to describe a large snowman, gaining over 2,000 retweets and 10,000 likes (shown below, right).



    The spread of the jokes led to coverage by The Daily Dot,[5] as well as an inquiry about the phrase posted to /r/OutOfTheLoop.[6]

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/08/18--09:04: Clorox-chan
  • About

    Clorox-chan is an anthropomorphic anime representation of Clorox Bleach, a surface whitener made by Clorox. As drinking Clorox Bleach is a well-known means of poisoning oneself, many of the representations of the character have her referring to being drunk.

    Origin

    On January 2nd, 2018, the Facebook page for artist Kuma Artsu posted the the character,[1] gaining over 1,300 likes and reactions and 6,100 shares.



    Spread

    On January 3rd, the day after Kumaartsu posted the image, YouTuber TheDracerGx included the drawing in a video which gained over 62,000 views (shown below).



    The same day, a cosplay of the character was posted by Facebook user Pervychu Alice[2] (shown below).



    The character soon spread to /r/animemes, inspiring various different artistic interpretations of the character. For example, on January 6th, Redditor Dead_Orbit55[3] posted an interpretation that gained over 1,200 upvotes (shown below, left). Meanwhile, Kuma Artsu drew several more pictures of the character. On January 3rd, they drew a picture of Clorox-chan encouraging people to drink bleach, gaining over 500 likes and reactions (shown below, right).[4]



    On January 5th, YouTuber Bijaan Mike uploaded a video of himself reacting to Clorox-chan images, gaining over 108,000 views (shown below).



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Facebook – Kumaartsu

    [2]Facebook – Pervychu Alice

    [3]Reddit – Clorox-chan

    [4]Facebook – Kumaartsu 2


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  • 01/08/18--09:13: Oprah 2020
  • About

    Oprah 2020 refers to the speculation surrounding entrepreneur and television host Oprah Winfrey’s supposed running for president in the 2020 election.

    Origin

    Speculation surrounding Oprah’s desire to run for president has existed since her cultural ascension in the late 80s and early 90s, based on the amount of success and influence she held in the television landscape.

    In 2006, for example, Oprah Winfrey’s legal team sent a cease-and-desit to a Kansas City businessman named Patrick Crowe, who wrote a book backing her bid called Oprah for President: Run Oprah Run. [1] The book laid out a plan for Oprah to run in the 2008 election. Of the controversy, Oprah said, “I feel flattered by it.My lawyers overreacted, I think, by sending him a cease-and-desist order because it really is a flattering thing. It should have been handled in a phone call.”

    Oprah has regularly denied rumors that she is considering a presidential bid. In June 2016, she appeared on Jimmy Kimmel Live, where she not only denied that she would be Donald Trump’s running mate, which had been a rumor in the past, and that she would ever run for president. However, she did joke that she no longer thinks that she is unqualified.



    Spread

    Following the 2016 presidential election, some in the news media began publishing arguments for Oprah’s running in the 2020 election. Their ideas, at least in part, were based on the idea of running a celebrity of Donald Trump-like popularity and influence.

    In November 13th, 2016, shortly after the election, filmmaker Michael Moore appeared on CNN’s “State of the Union”[2] to argue for running more popular media personalities, including Oprah.

    Later that month, HuffPost[3] published a blogpost entitled “Oprah for President, 2020.”



    Golden Globes Speech

    At the Golden Globes on January 7th, 2018, man throughout the night made mention of Oprah perhaps running for president, including host Seth Meyers, who at the beginning of the night joked that if his performance at the 2011 White House correspondents dinner inspired Trump to run, he would do the same for Oprah (shown below, left).

    Later in the evening, accepting the Cecil B. DeMille award, Oprah gave a speech that touched upon many of the cultural issues of 2017, particularly the Me Too movement (shown below, right). Within 12 hours of the speech being uploaded to YouTube, it had reached #2 on the site’s trending charts and received more than 749,000 views.



    Following the speech, many online took to speculating about Oprah’s running. However, the reaction to the speculation was mixed. Twitter[4] user tweeted, “If you need me for the next two years I’ll be drafting tweets in support of Oprah’s 2020 presidential campaign.” The post (shown below, left) received more than 2,400 retweets and 21,000 likes in 12 hours.

    Twitter[5] user @drewmagary joked, “TOPFRONTRUNNERSFORPREZ 2020 1. Oprah 2. The Rock 3. Beyonce 4. Hey what about Angelina she seems to know her stuff 5. A Fast & Furious sequel 6. The gif of that one dude blinking.” This tweet (shown below, enter) received more than 600 retweets and 2,300 likes in three hours.

    Additionally, Twitter user @sjdemas tweeted, “People who gave Trump wall-to-wall coverage in 2016 are now going nuts about Oprah running in 2020, so basically, we’re screwed.”



    MSNBC anchor Joy Reid tweeted[8]a picture of The Rock, who has also, reportedly, been contemplating running, at the ceremony with the caption “When Oprah is speaking at the Golden Globes and your goals shift to VP…” The post (shown below) received more than 8,500 rewteets and 43,000 likes in less than 24 hours.



    Later that evening, Winfrey’s longtime partner Stedman Graham told the Los Angeles Times,[7]“It’s up to the people. She would absolutely do it.”

    Twitter[13] published a Moments page, documenting the reaction to Oprah “actively thinking” thinking about a presidential run.

    Media Coverage

    Many news outlets reported on the speculation surrounding Oprah’s 2020 presidential bid, including CNN,[9] Vox,[10] Business Insider,[11]BBC[12] and more.

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/08/18--10:17: Devilman
  • About

    History

    Devilman Crybaby

    Online Presence

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/08/18--10:46: Golden Globes 2018
  • About

    The 2018 Golden Globes was an award ceremony run by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, who voted on the best in film and television for 2017. The award ceremony was marked by several political moment, as it is the first large, televised gathering of Hollywood elites since the sexual harassment allegations against Harvey Weinstein were made public.

    Background

    On November 27th, 2017, Seth Meyers was confirmed as host of the Golden Globes.[1] The 75th Annual Golden Gloes would be held on January 7th, 2018, making it the first large gathering of Hollywood elites in the wake of the Harvey Weinstein Scandals.

    As a result of the ongoing conversation regarding the sexual misconduct in Hollywood, attendees were reportedly planning on wearing all black to show solidarity with the Me Too movement.[2]

    Development

    Willem Dafoe Reaction

    During his opening monologue, Seth Meyers joked about a scenario Willem Defoe mistaking his winning an award for an allegation made against him (shown below).



    Following the comment, the camera cut over to Dafoe, who looked shocked by his name being red and then laughed. His face was shared online by numerous people, using it as a reaction image (examples below).



    Releated Memes

    Oprah 2020

    “Oprah 2020” refers to the speculation surrounding Oprah Winfrey’s presidential candidacy in 2020, following the reaction to her Golden Globe acceptance speech.

    Accepting the Cecil B. DeMille award, Oprah gave a speech that touched upon many of the cultural issues of 2017, particularly the Me Too movement (shown below, right). Within 12 hours of the speech being uploaded to YouTube, it had reached #2 on the site’s trending charts and received more than 749,000 views.



    Following the speech, many online took to speculating about Oprah’s running. However, the reaction to the speculation was mixed. Twitter[2] user tweeted, “If you need me for the next two years I’ll be drafting tweets in support of Oprah’s 2020 presidential campaign.” The post (shown below, left) received more than 2,400 retweets and 21,000 likes in 12 hours.

    Twitter[4] user @drewmagary joked, “TOPFRONTRUNNERSFORPREZ 2020 1. Oprah 2. The Rock 3. Beyonce 4. Hey what about Angelina she seems to know her stuff 5. A Fast & Furious sequel 6. The gif of that one dude blinking.” This tweet (shown below, enter) received more than 600 retweets and 2,300 likes in three hours.

    Additionally, Twitter[5] user @sjdemas tweeted, “People who gave Trump wall-to-wall coverage in 2016 are now going nuts about Oprah running in 2020, so basically, we’re screwed.”



    MSNBC anchor Joy Reid tweeted[6] a picture of The Rock, who has also, reportedly, been contemplating running, at the ceremony with the caption “When Oprah is speaking at the Golden Globes and your goals shift to VP…” The post (shown below) received more than 8,500 rewteets and 43,000 likes in less than 24 hours.



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/08/18--12:12: Very Stable Genius
  • About

    Very Stable Genius is a memorable quote from United States President Donald Trump, who after a scathing report on his mental capacity to handle the role of president was released, defended himself in a series of tweets that were met with even more scrutiny.

    Origin

    On January 6th, 2017, President Trump responded to reports that questioned his mental stability found in the exposé Fire and Fury by Michael Wolff. The book shared accounts from Trump’s own staff who questioned the president’s mental health. In s series of three tweets, [1] he defended himself and said, “Now that Russian collusion, after one year of intense study, has proven to be a total hoax on the American public, the Democrats and their lapdogs, the Fake News Mainstream Media, are taking out the old Ronald Reagan playbook and screaming mental stability and intelligence. Actually, throughout my life, my two greatest assets have been mental stability and being, like, really smart. Crooked Hillary Clinton also played these cards very hard and, as everyone knows, went down in flames. I went from VERY successful businessman, to top T.V. Star to President of the United States (on my first try). I think that would qualify as not smart, but genius….and a very stable genius at that!” The posts received more than 33,000 retweets and 130,000 likes each. However, the final one, in which he calls himself “a very stable genius” received more than 102,000 comments as well.



    Spread

    Shortly after the president tweeted, people online began mocking the president for his choice of words. CNN’s Jake Tapper tweeted,[2]“I’m smart,” along with a gif from the film The Godfather: Part 2, in which one of the characters cries, “I’m smart!” The post (shown below) received more than 6,100 retweets and 21,200 likes in less than three days.




    Throughout the morning, more people mocked the president’s use of the phrases “very stable genius” and “being, like, really smart.” These insults were often paired with pictures that highlighted people’s issues with Trump, his supporters and administration.



    Stephen Miller’s Jake Tapper Interview

    On January 7th, 2017, White House adviser Stephen Miller appeared on CNN’s State of the Union with Jake Tapper. Miller, who was asked to defend the president’s tweets and his mental state, discussed the policies and accomplishments of the president. However, after being pushed by Tapper to answer questions regarding the tweets, the exchange turned hostile. Tapper ended the interview, and according to reports, Miller had to be escorted off the set by security.[3]



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/08/18--13:06: I Enjoy...
  • About

    I Enjoy… refers to a shitpostingsnowclone in which people post about things with the construction, "I enjoy X. They are my favorite Y. When (something good happens), I think to myself “yes”. When (something bad happens), I think to myself “no”." It is often used with sports teams.

    Origin

    On January 3rd, 2018, Reddit user Rapey_Keebler_Elves[1] posted a text post in /r/minnesotavikings, a subreddit for the National Football League’s Minnesota Vikings, which read, "I enjoy watching the Minnesota Vikings play football. They are my favorite NFL team. When they score a touchdown, I think to myself “yes”. When the other team scores a touchdown, I think to myself “no”." The post gained over 13,700 upvotes.



    Spread

    After the popularity of that post, the post became a snowclone for other fandoms in Reddit. For example, in /r/RocketLeague, user alfabetsoop[2] posted a variation for the video game which read, "I enjoy playing Rocket League. It is my favorite video game. When my team scores a goal, I think to myself “yes”. When the other team scores a goal, I think to myself “no”." The post gained over 25,000 upvotes (shown below, left). Another post to /r/falcons[3] which used the snowclone for the NFL’s Atlanta Falcons, gaining over 550 upvotes (shown below, right).



    Many of the posts in the snowclone involved sporting teams. Other popular posts regarding other subjects include a post by Redditor DangerJuice[4] about a weapon in _PlayerUnknown: Battlegrounds that gained over 7,300 upvotes (shown below, left). Another popular example was posted about the television show The Flash,[5] gaining 1,200 upvotes. An inquiry about the meme was posted to /r/OutOfTheLoop,[6] where it gained over 240 upvotes.



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References


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    Overview

    • H&M’s “Coolest Monkey in the Jungle” Ad* refers to the negative reaction to an advertisement for H&M clothing stores featuring a black child wearing a sweatshirt that reads “Coolest Money in the Jungle.” Some online claimed that while the ad was likely an oversight, it was also tone deaf and racially insensitive.

    Background

    On January 7th, 2018, Twitter user @NerdAboutTown tweeted, “Whose idea was it at @hm to have this little sweet black boy wear a jumper that says ‘coolest monkey in the jungle’? I mean. What.” They included a picture from H&M that features a black child wearing a sweatshirt that reads, “Coolest Monkey in the Jungle.” The post (shown below) recevied mor tahn 19,000 retweets and 24,000 likes in 24 hours.



    Developments

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/08/18--13:45: RCDart
  • About

    RCDart is the artist name of a fan artist best known for controversial depictions of gender-swapped characters as well as a drawing of Finn from the 2010s Star Wars films with exaggerated features that were interpreted as racist.

    History

    Trans-fetish Controversy

    Racist Finn Drawing Controversy

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/08/18--14:20: Jake Tapper
  • About

    Jake Tapper is an American journalist and television host for CNN. His shows include The Lead with Jake Tapper and State of the Union.

    History

    Following several years of working as a press secretary and in public relatons, Jake Tapper began his career as a journalist in 1998, working as a writer for Washington City Paper and, later, Salon.com.

    His teleivision career started in 2001, when Tapper hosted CNN talk show Take Five. He later moved to ABC News, in 2003, covering such headline news as the war in Afganishtan and Hurricane Katrina.

    Tapper worked at ABC until 2012, when he returned to CNN as the chief Washington Correspondent. The following year, he launched his own series, The Lead with Jake Tapper.[1]

    Stephen Miller’s Jake Tapper Interview

    On January 7th, 2017, White House adviser Stephen Miller appeared on CNN’s State of the Union with Jake Tapper. Miller, who was asked to defend the president’s tweets and his mental state, discussed the policies and accomplishments of the president. However, after being pushed by Tapper to answer questions regarding the tweets, the exchange turned hostile. Tapper ended the interview, and according to reports, Miller had to be escorted off the set by security.[3]



    Reputation

    In 2014, Mediaite[2] called The Lead with Jake Tapper the best show on cable news. In their assessment, they wrote:

    “Jake Tapper’s year-old CNN show is the perfect mix of straight news reports, tough interviews, and brief entertainment interludes that cable news execs likely used to dream of, before blowhard-driven theatrics became the bellwether for ratings. Tapper has quickly developed a reputation as an equal opportunity skeptic -- confronting Democratic politicians just as toughly as he would Republican ones. He’s among the most respected names in cable news, we’d argue; not because he’s so affable, but because he reminds viewers what news delivery can be like without the shouting, battling, blasting, or slamming. He’s also not afraid to get a little honest at times.”

    Criticism

    Related Memes

    #TapperDirtFile

    #TapperDirtFile is a satirical hashtag containing humorous, innocuous factoids about CNN anchor Jake Tapper, which were inspired by rumors that he was being targeted by the GOP for aggressively questioning Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway in early February 2017.

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/08/18--16:30: The Soylent Grin
  • About

    The Soylent Grin also known as the nu-male smile refers to a facial expression often associated with nu-males expressing surprise or excitement in photographs.

    Search Interest


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  • 01/08/18--16:33: Manlet
  • About

    Manlet (a portmanteau of man and midget) is a pejorative term referring to men who are below 6 feet in height and feel compelled to emphasize their masculinity for it through weight lifting. Online, the term is often used in a similar fashion to “beta male” in reference to succes with females, especially on fitness boards such as 4chan’s /fit/ (Health & Fitness).

    Origin

    It is unknown when manlet first started appearing in fitness threads. 4chan archive desuarchive only dates back the searches for “manlet” up to July 2012,[1] while the earliest Urban Dictionary translation dates back to April 2005.[2]

    Spread

    Any height below 6 feet is typically referred to as manlet, while some also refer to 5’11" as “King of Manlets” due to it being the highest achieveable height before 6 feet. Over time various height scales have been created to classify manlet heights, however some of these charts shift the top manlet cutoff to either include 5’10" and up or exclude 6’1" and under. While the reasons for this differ and may rely on the height of the image’s creator, 6’0" is on average typically seen as the manlet cutoff.



    Additionally, various jokes have become popular surrounding the manlet term, most revolving around attempts by manlets to increase their height. The most notable jokes include drinking gallons of whole milk, doing stretches in their workouts, and using orthotics or wearing boots.



    Related Term: Lanklet

    Lanklet (a portmanteau of manlet and lanky) is a similar term to manlet, but instead aimed at tall people. The term is most commonly seen as a counter pejorative term to manlet. Similar to manlet, lanklet has become associated with various jokes surrounding the term, most notably a lanky build, increased difficulty in gaining muscle mass, and a comparison to the average height of US males; however the last one is in return also used against manlets as an attempt to change the top manlet cutoff.



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Desuarchive – Search: ‘manlet’

    [2]Urban Dictionary – Search: ‘manlet’


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  • 01/08/18--18:34: Is that a despacito meme
  • Is That a Despacito MEME? Originated from the DDLC Fan Club discord and Is spammed everywhere because It a good reaction to any MEME that doesn’t even have to do with despacito.


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  • 01/08/18--20:32: Blinds Miami
  • It’s true that windows are meant for fresh air passage, sunlight and other outside elements. But sometimes, you too want to keep these elements out of your room. This’s why, opt for blinds from Charlie’s Home Décor in Miami. We specialize in providing customers with customized window treatments. Visit http://www.charlieshomedecor.com/


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  • 01/06/18--16:29: Brandon Rogers
  • [WIP]


    About

    Brandon Rogers is a Youtube comedian known for his viral videos that quick, polished editing with employ low-brow, off-color, and often offensive, humor, and the multitude of characters and stereotypes he portrays in his videos, not dissimilar to the videos of Filthy Frank. Since the creation of his channel he has received over 3 million subscribers as of 2018 and is currently working on series such as Magic Funhouse.

    History

    Brandon created his YouTube account on January 7, 2006. On December 6th of that year he uploaded his first video “Celebrity Impressions”(shown below)

    Brandon would go on to create skit videos, eventually creating what would become recurring characters for his videos throughout. It is through these videos that he really gained internet fame, particularly from a 2015 Vine which took a clip from one of his video in which he was portraying his grandpa character saying “try me bitch” to one of his grandkids after the kid threw candy at him.(shown below) as of the writing of this article the video has over 22.5 million views.


    To date his most popular video is “A Day at the Park (MILLIONSUBSCRIBERSPECIAL!)” which to date has over 27 million views.(shown below)

    Reputation

    Related Memes

    There Is Only One Thing Worse Than A Rapist

    Personal Life

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/09/18--01:19: Hopsin


  • About

    Hopsin (stage name of Marcus Jamal Hopson) is an American rapper known for his white contact lenses during performances and corny lyrics.

    History

    Hopsin released his first mixtape “Emurge” in 2003, although copies were few and no official versions of it has been released online by Hopsin himself. He was signed to Ruthless Records on 2007,[1] and released his first lead single “Pans In the Kitchen” on May 27, 2008.[2] The single was included in his debut album “Gazing at the Moonlight.”, released October 27, 2009.[3]



    Shortly after his debut’s release, he departed from Ruthless Records due to the lack of any album promotions and artist support.[4] He later founded his own independent label Funk Volume, and posted his music video “Sag My Pants” on October 8, 2010, with over 47 million views. The album promoted by the song, “Raw,” was later released on November 19, 2010.[5] On July 18, 2012, he uploaded the 5th installment of his “Ill Mind of Hopsin” series, wherein he vents about various topics in his mind. It is his most popular video in his channel, hitting over 88 million views.



    He released his third album “Knock Madness” on November 24, 2013,[6] with generally positive reviews from critics.[7] On June 18, 2014, the music video for “The Ill Mind of Hopsin 7” was released to promote his album “Pound Syndrome”, which came out on July 15, 2015.[8]



    On January 7, 2016, he announced on his Facebook page that his label Funk Volume is “officially dead”, due to business issues with co-founder Damien Ritter. He also released “The Ill Mind of Hopsin 8” two months after the post as a diss track to Damien.







    Since Funk Volume’s disbandment, Hopsin started a new independent label called Undercover Prodigy. He released his first lead single of his new album “No Shame” on September 21, 2017, titled “The Purge”. The album was later released on November 24, 2017.[9]


    Online Presence

    He has a high following in his social media sites, with over 2.9 million likes on his Facebook page[10] and more than 566,000 followers on Twitter. [11] Despite this, he has been negatively received in many online communities for his corny lyrics, extreme similarities to Eminem, selfishness, and overall negative attitude towards others. His highest album score on user-aggregated review site Rate Your Music is 2.28 (out of 5,) with his lowest being 1.14 (out of 5).[12]



    Anthony Fantano has given two of his albums a 3/10, and one of them a “light to decent” 4/10, stating that he is highly skilled in technique and production, but has “no [musical] taste” and is very self-narcissistic.



    Related Memes

    “Did the Man Who Invented College Go to College?”

    “Did the Man Who Invented College Go to College?” is a line from Hopsin’s song “Fly”, which was intended to challenge the idea that college is the only way to become successful, and implied that the person who conceptualized colleges didn’t need it to attain success. This is Hopsin’s most popular line for its corniness and lack of research.



    Happy Ending

    “Happy Ending” is a song about Hopsin getting sexual pleasure from a masseuse in an Asian massage parlor. The original music video was taken down from YouTube for nudity and sex, and was poorly received for its badly written lyrics and racist stereotypes towards Asians.



    Notable Videos




    Search Interest

    References


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  • 01/09/18--07:56: The Eric Andre Show
  • About

    The Eric Andre Show is a surreal comedy television show starring Eric Andre and Hannibal Buress. The show is a parody of low-budget public access talk shows with Andre serving as the host. Often Andre will surprise guests with unexpected questions or stunts.

    History

    Reception

    Online Presence

    Related Memes

    Pretzels Is The Same

    Why Are You Booing Me? I’m Right

    Why Would You Say Something So Controversial Yet So Brave?

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/09/18--08:40: Bat- (Prefix)
  • About

    Bat- (Prefix) refers to a phrasal template based on the name’s of devices on the 1966 Batman television series in which the superhero Batman brands with the prefix “Bat.”

    Origin

    Premiering in January 12th, 1966, the Batman television series starring Adam West and Burt Ward introduced the idea of a “Bat” labeling system en masse.[3] The show accounted for the character’s seemingly endless array of personalized devices by adding the word “Bat” to the beginning of the word.

    The use of the phrase became a catchphrase on the show.

    Spread

    Batlabels

    On November 8th, 2015, the Twitter[5] @BatLabels launched. The Twitter archives the explanatory labels for the various Bat-branded devices used on the 1966 television series. As of January 2018, the account has more than 49,000 followers.

    The following day, on November 9th, 2015 Tumblr[4] user Aaron Reynolds started the Tumblr account “batlables.” The account is described as “collecting the explanatory labels on everything in the 1966-1968 Batman TV series” (examples below).



    Robin: What’s a [X] Memes

    Based on the dialogue from the 60s television series, this series is a parody conversation between Batman and Robin. In the dialogue, Batman mentions a word that is not a Bat device but has the prefix “bat,” and Robin assumes it is a Bat-labeled device (e.g. Batmobile, Batcopter) and asks "What’s [the suffix of the word].

    On January 6th, 2018, Twitter[1] user @fro_vo tweeted, “ROBIN: the batmobile won’t start / BATMAN: check the battery / ROBIN: what’s a tery.” The post (shown below) received more than 74,000 retweets and 211,000 likes in three days.



    The following day, Redditor[2] kynlemssb shared @fro_vo’s tweet on the /r/meirl subreddit. Within in two days, the post received more than 17,000 points (97% upvoted) and 100 comments.

    Over the next few days, variations of this format became more common on /r/dankmemes[6] and /r/meirl.



    On January 9th, Redditor[7] IrockART98 asked about the memes on the /r/OutOfTheLoop subreddit. The post received more than 1,500 points (89% upvoted) and 60 comments in less than 24 hours.

    Search Interest

    Not Available.

    External References


    0 0
  • 01/09/18--11:29: Charles C. Johnson
  • About

    Charles C. Johnson or “Chuck” Johnson is an American alt-right activist and the owner of the websites GotNews.com and WeSearchr.com. Though he considers himself an “investigative journalist,” many of his claims have proven unsubstantiated and false. Because of his presence online appears to be more about disruption than truth, many critics refer to Johnson as an internet troll.

    History

    Johnson first came to prominence online through a series of controversial news articles that have, by and large, been proven false. On November 11th, 2012, he contributed to a Daily Caller[1] article that alleged that Senator Bob Menedez had paid two women in the Dominican Republic for sex. These claims were never substantiated as the Washington Post[2] reported that the women were paid to make the claims.

    The following year, he again made unsubstantiaed claims that Cory Booker, then-Newark mayor and senatorial candidate, did not live in Newark, NJ.[3] After Booker provided proof of rent, Johnson continued to assert that Booker did not live in the city.[4]

    GotNews

    In January 2014, Johnson launched GotNews,[7] a crowd-funded news outlet, which publishes Johnson’s pieces. The site describes itself as:

    “Got News seeks to transform journalism by empowering everyday people, experts, and sources to break news and get rewarded for their effort.

    “Got News is in the first stage of its rollout where we will publish our own stories as well as those of select researchers and citizen journalists. In stage two members will join the site and start posting stories to earn income based on their web traffic.”

    UVA Rape Case

    In December 2014, Johnson threatened to dox the alleged victim of the University of Virginia’s rape on campus allegation. On December 7th, 2014, he tweeted] “I’m giving Jackie until later tonight to tell the truth and then i’m going to start revealing everything about her past.”



    The tweet created a public outcry for Johnson to be removed from Twitter. Johnson, however, posted a photograph of a young woman he identified as the victime named Jackie. This turned out to be false. He apologized[6] for the mistake, saying, “In the rush to publish, I screwed up and ask your forgiveness… [W]hile I’ve broken many stories before everyone else, I’m still human and make mistakes.”

    Twitter Banning

    The following year, he was again the subject of controversy on Twitter, after he made, what some perceived to be threats against Black Lives Matter activist DeRay Mckesson. On May 24th, 2015, Johnson tweeted, “Go to gotnews,com/donate if you want to give money to taking out @deray.”

    Later that day, Mckesson tweeted,[8]“So, I woke up to this. Hate is organized in America. & yes, I take this as a serious threat.” The tweet (shown below) received more than 3,900 retweets and 2,300 likes as of January 2018.



    On May 26th, 2015, Johnson was permanently banned from Twitter, as was his alternate account, @citizen trolling.

    Search Interest

    External References


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