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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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    L’utilisation continue de produits de soins de la peau chimiques peut entraîner une peau malsaine et l’acné, la dermatite, l’eczéma et / ou le psoriasis, le vieillissement prématuré et l’augmentation des niveaux de toxines dans le corps. Les ingrédients chimiques peuvent ajouter à la «charge corporelle» des substances indésirables. En outre, des études récentes ont soulevé des alarmes sur l’accumulation de produits chimiques dans les bébés à naître.

    Les ingrédients suivants sont couramment utilisés dans les soins de la peau et les produits cosmétiques. Certains ont des molécules beaucoup trop grandes pour être absorbées par la peau. Au lieu de cela, ils ont tendance à étouffer la peau et à bloquer la respiration normale de la peau en formant un film qui emprisonne l’humidité, les toxines et les déchets tout en empêchant l’apport d’oxygène.

    http://supplementlab.org/dermagen-iq/


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  • 11/21/17--13:17: Dr. Phil M&M
  • About

    Dr. Phil M&M refers to a character online resembling a cross between television psychologist Dr. Phil and the Green M&M character. Since first appearing in 2008, it has been widely regarded as a “disturbing” character and saw a spike in use in 2017 after being used in videos by YouTuber Sethical.

    Origin

    The character comes from a print ad campaign run by M&Ms between 2007 and 2008 with the theme “There’s a little M&M in all of us.” The campaign edited M&Ms in the likenesses of celebrities (Dr. Phil likeness shown below). The ads were created by BBDO agency.[1]



    Online, one of the earliest known edits of the image came from a post on November 29th, 2008 to blog Post Rejects[2] which showed the image with the caption “I know this image was created with clever digital manipulation. Still, it haunts my dreams” (shown below).



    Spread

    The image appeared several times in the ensuing years. On February 25th, 2015, it was posted to Imgur saying it was “the stuff of nightmares.”[3] It was posted to /r/NotTimAndEricPics[4] on June 9th, 2016, where it gained over 150 upvotes. On July 7th, 2016, the post was uploaded to Tumblr by user zonecassette[7] referencing You Know I Had To Do It To Em (shown below, left). One of the earliest variations of the character was upped to Reddit’s me_irl subreddit[5] on October 16th, 2016 by Redditor amedema, gaining 300 upvotes. The character in that edit was wearing a pair of Timbs (shown below, right).



    After that post, the character began seeing use as a meme. A popular post circulating on Tumblr[6] featured the character reblogged by a deactivated user named traitour on a post which read “Reblog this if you aren’t homophobic,” gaining over 470,000 notes (shown below, left). A dedicated Twitter parody account for the character began posting regularly around that time. On October 24th, 2016, the account posted an edit of Dr. Phil M&M with the caption “i have been t ohell and back. these scars r a reminded of my misdeeds. i will never litter again, god #hellsucks” (shown below, right).



    The character saw a spike in meme usage in the summer of 2017 when it was used in several popular YouTube videos by user Sethical. On June 21st, 2017, the character featured in his video “No Clout,” which gained over 1.8 million views (shown below, left). The character appeared again in a July 17th, 2017 video that gained over 1.6 million views (shown below, right). The origins of the character were asked on /r/OutOfTheLoop[7] on July 26th, 2017.



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/21/17--14:15: HQ - Live Trivia Game Show
  • About

    HQ -- Live Trivia Game Show is an online, app-based trivia game hosted by Scott Rogowski. Users log on to the app and are brought into a game by a push notification. Once logged on, Rogowski asks a series of 12 questions, the last user still in the game is eligible for cash prizes.

    History

    Created by Vine founders Rus Yusupov and Colin Kroll, HQ launched on August 26th, 2017 for Apple’s iOS operating system.[1][2]



    Daily Beast Profile

    On November 21st, 2017, The Daily Beast[6] published an article detailing their issues attempting to produce a profile on host Scott Rogowsky. After speaking with Rogowsky, CEO Rus Yusupov objected to the article, saying that the Daily beast was “‘completely unauthorized’ to write about Scott or HQ.” Yusupov went on to say that if the Daily Beast wrote anything about either, Rogowsky would be fired.

    After being given a copy of the article, Yusupov continued his objections. When he read that Rogosky said that he “enjoys making people happy and giving them the trivia they want,” the CEO responded, “He cannot say that people want trivia”

    “It’s highly unprofessional. Highly unprofessional of you to reach out to one of our contract employees without my permission and without going through proper press channels.”

    However, despite his obejctions, Yusupov, as of November 2017, had not terminated Rogowsky.

    Features

    The game combines game show elements from such games as Who Wants to be a Millionaire? and Jeopardy and combines them with live-streaming capability. The game is played daily at 3PM and 9PM for about 13 minutes each.

    HQ is hosted by comedian Scott Rogowsky or British personality Sharon Carpenter. IN each version, the game is 12 mulitple choice questions answered in live chat at the bottom of the screen.

    Unlike other games, HQ is played for real money, giving away up $500 a day.[5]

    Highlights

    On July 17th, 2017, the official HQ Twitter[3] acocunt launched, garnering more than 12,000 followers in four months.

    According to a November 2017 report, nearly 90,000 people played the game on November 12th.[4]

    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    Donald Trump’s Time “Person of the Year” Tweet refers to a series of parodies, jokes and references to a post on Twitter made by United States President Donald Trump in which he says he was offered the title of Time magazine’s Person of the Year but turned it down. Online, people were skeptical as to the validity of the president’s claims, prompting Time to deny their conversation with the president.

    Origin

    On November 24th, 2017, President Trump tweeted,[1]“Time Magazine called to say that I was PROBABLY going to be named “Man (Person) of the Year,” like last year, but I would have to agree to an interview and a major photo shoot. I said probably is no good and took a pass. Thanks anyway!” The post (shown below) received more than 43,000 retweets and 160,000 likes in three days.



    Spread

    Shortly after the president tweeted, many online began replacing the specifics of the post with humorous and/or absurd magazine titles or situations due to the skepticism some had toward Trump’s assertion. That day, Veep actress Julia Louis Dreyfus tweeted,[2]“.@nytimes just called to say I was PROBABLY going to be named comedienne of the year but I would have to agree to an interview and a major photo shoot. I said probably is no good and took a pass. Thanks anyway!” The tweet (shown below, left) received more than 16,000 retweets and 109,000 likes in three days.

    Additionally, Star Wars actor Mark Hamill tweeted,[3] "Time Magazine called to say that I was DEFINITELY going to be named “Man (Person) of the Year” but I would have to agree to leak major #Ep8 spoilers. I said “no problem”, but then they told me you turned it down and now I don’t want it anymore. Thanks anyway!" The post (shown below, center) received more than 11,000 retweets and 53,000 likes in three days.

    Get Out director Jordan Peele replied[4] to a tweet by comedian Patton Oswalt with, “Patton Oswalt called to say that he was going to tweet that GETOUT was PROBABLY his favorite movie of the year, but I would have to agree to get lunch with him and do a major photo shoot. I said probably is no good and took a pass. Thanks anyway!” Within three days, the tweet (shown below, right) received more than 4,000 retweets and 37,000 likes.



    Later that day, Time magazine responded on Twitter.[5] They wrote, “The President is incorrect about how we choose Person of the Year. TIME does not comment on our choice until publication, which is December 6.” The post (shown below) received more than 185,000 retweets and 510,000 likes in less than three days.



    That day, Twitter[6] user @adamjwhitedc pointed out the numerous tweets Trumps has made about the “Person of the Year.” He tweeted, “He gets worked up over Time Magazine’s Man of the Year Award almost every year. Like clockwork.” The post (shown below) included a series of tweets Trump has made about the Person of the Year and received more than 39,000 retweets and 89,000 likes in three days.



    The following day, former Time editor Richard Stengel tweeted, “Mr. President, just to clarify things, I wanted to offer a few statistics. Number of times you were Person of the Year during the 7 years I was editor of Time: 0. Number of times you were on the cover: 0. Number of times you made the Time 100 influentials list: 0. Thanks anyway!” The post (shown below) received more than 100,000 retweets and 330,000 likes in less than two days.



    Several news media outlets covered the response to Trump’s tweet, including USA Today,[7]CNN,[8] The Atlantic,[9] The Washington Post[10] and more. That day, Twitter[11] published a Moments page regarding the skeptism and response to Trump’s tweet.

    Various Examples




    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/27/17--07:16: Prongles
  • About

    Prongles are a type of potato chip created by the people behind the popular card game Cards Against Humanity. The chips are made in parody of Pringles potato chips as well as cartoon mascots for food products marketed towards children in the 1990s. Initially, it was unclear who created the product until several Reddit users tracked down Cards Against Humanity by examining the product’s packaging.

    Origin

    The product began appearing in Target stores around mid-November, 2017. One of the earliest Reddit posts to document Prongles was posted to /r/crappyoffbrands on November 14th, 2017,[1] where it gained over 250 points (shown below).



    Spread

    On November 16th, in a thread on /r/holidaybullshit,[2] Redditor DaveLambert uploaded several pictures to Imgur[3] in which he documented his process investigating the origin of Prongles. He recognized the chip can rang up as “CAH Card Game” and that the can beneath the label was of “The Good Crisp Company,” suggesting the Prongles cans were repackaged. By searching a code, he was led to OriginalProngles.net,[8] and by searching that domain on gandi.net, he confirmed that that the site was registered to Cards Against Humanity LLC.



    On November 21st, the product began going viral on Twitter following a tweet by @katangus[4] showcasing the chips, gaining over 26,000 retweets and 73,000 likes (shown below).



    The viral tweet led to media attention. Grubstreet[5] covered the Reddit threads first, followed by Uproxx[6] and Mashable.[7] Fans noticed the brand’s parody of Pringles’ slogan “Once you pop the fun don’t stop,” as the slogan for Prongles is “Once you pop… that’s great!” On November 24th, the OriginalProngles site launched.[9] On the Original Prongles website, a song plays in the style of 90s hip-hop jingles for kids food products like Reese’s Puffs (shown below).



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/27/17--09:13: In This House
  • About

    In This House refers to a series of ASCII art houses paired with the phrase “In this house we.” The meme refers to what users like and dislike, asigning those things in the positive to rules of their “house.”

    Origin

    The earliest known iteration of the meme was posted on April 1st, 2016 by Twitter[1] user @intosyou. That day they posted:



    Spread

    Shortly after the inital post, more people began posting variations on the meme. With each variant, the user would replace what they “love” and “appreciate” in their own “house” (examples below).



    In August 2016, a Twitter[3] account that takes submissions for “In This House” memes launched on Twitter. They accept messages from followers and put messages into the meme. Several months later, in February 2017, a similar account launched on Tumblr.[4]

    On November 14th, 2016, Tumblr[2] user hunkgarrett-remade posted a version that read “In this house we love & appreciate Hunk Garret.” The post (shown below) received more than 3,800 notes in one year.


    The following year, on November 20th, 2017, Twitter[5] user @NOTVIKING tweeted a variation with the text “in this house we delete tweets after 30 seconds because we are unconfident in our sense of humor & don’t want to be judged by strangers on the internet.” The post (shown below, left) received more than 18,000 retweets and 47,000 likes in less than a week.

    Several days later, Twitter[6] user @dracomalfoys tweeted the meme with the text “in this house we are courteous to retail workers pulling 12+ hrs shifts during the holiday season cause we arent fucking demons.” Within four days, the post (shown below, center) received more that 59,000 retweets and 172,000 likes.

    On November 23rd, Twitter[7] user @lovelymax tweeted a version first shared by @WaWaTheFox[8] that shows the house disjointed with the text “In this house we wtf happened to my house.” The post (shown below, right) received more than 70 retweets and 134 likes in four days.



    External References

    [1]Twitter – @intosyou’s Tweet

    [2]Tumblr – “hunkgarrett-remade’s Post”:

    [3]Twitter – @inthishouse

    [4]Tumblr – in-this-house-we

    [5]Twitter – @NOTVIKING’s Tweet

    [6]Twitter – @dracomalfoys’ Tweet

    [7]Twitter – @loveIymax’s Tweet

    [8]Twitter – @WaWaTheFox’s Tweet


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  • 11/27/17--09:42: Dog Petting Photoshops
  • About

    Dog Petting Photoshops refer to images popular on /r/me_irl and elsewhere in which pictures are photoshopped such that an image of a hand petting a dog’s head is superimposed on an image of a person, making it appear that that person is petting the dog.

    Origin

    The photoshops began appearing on Reddit’s /r/me_irl subreddit on November 16th, 2017. That day, one of the earliest known edits applied the dog in a Drake and Josh Logo Photoshop, gaining over 3,600 upvotes[1] (shown below).



    Spread

    Various Examples

    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References


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    About

    Harry Styles Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show Dance refers to a series of pictures and videos of pop-singer Harry Styles’ performance at the 2017 Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show. Online, people compared the freeform choreography of Drake’s “Hotline Bling”.

    Origin

    On November 19th, 2017, pop singer Harry Styles performed a number of songs at the 2017 Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show in Shanghai. During the performance, some noted that the singer danced without choreography, allowing his arms to swing in a an unstructured way.



    Spread

    Shortly after the performance, people online began to tweet about the dance. The prevailing opinion about the combination of Styles’ mint-colored suit and his unstructured dance moves was that he resembled a “dad.”


    Tweet meme about how Harry Styles looks like he is an uncle dancing at a weddingScreen grab with two Victoria Secret models high-fiving each other as Harry Styles dances in the backgroundTweet declaring that Harry Style's dancing at the Victoria Secret Fashion Show was the best part of the event


    On November 20th, Twitter[5] user @sallyholmes posted a video of Styles dancing with the caption, “Funny, this is how I dance to Harry Styles too #VSFashionShow.” The post (shown below) received more than 700 retweets and 1,200 likes in less than three days.




    Several media outlets covered the reaction to Harry Styles’ dance including, Teen Vogue,[1] Refinery29,[2] Elite Daily,[3] Hollywood Life,[6] Elle,[7] The Straits Times,[8] Seventeen[4] and more.

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/27/17--10:49: Pretty vs. Bitchin'
  • About

    Pretty vs. Bitchin’ refers to a meme popular within Tumblr fandoms in which characters are compared between how they appeared in wholesome contexts (“pretty”) and more edgy contexts (“bitchin’”). The comparison stems from two Stranger Things scenes in which the character Eleven undergoes two makeovers, the first ending with her saying “pretty” and the second with her saying “bitchin’.”

    Origin

    In Stranger Things Season 1, episode 4, the character Eleven undergoes a makeover in which she is dressed in modest clothing and given a blonde wig over her shaved head. Upon seeing herself in the mirror, she declares “Pretty” (shown below, left). In season 2, episode 7 of the show, Eleven is given a makeover by a gang of punk rockers who make her look edgy. At the end of that makeover, Eleven says “Bitchin’” (shown below, right).



    Meme Documentation[1] traces a Tumblr post by ridincryindyin[2] from November 2nd, 2017, as the first to use the two scenes as reaction images. The Tumblr user captioned the photos “Me before I listen to Reputation vs. After I hear Reputation,” referring to the latest album by Taylor Swift (shown below).



    Spread

    Various Examples

    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References

    [1]Meme Documentation – Explained Pretty/Bitchin Meme

    [2]Tumblr – ridincryindyin


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  • 11/27/17--10:50: Thanksgiving Grandma
  • About

    Thanksgiving Grandma refers to a viral story about a grandmother texting a Thanksgiving invitation to the wrong number and inviting the recipient to dinner after he corrected her. The story received media attention after the strangers met for thanksgiving for a second year in a row.

    Origin

    On November 15th, 2016, Twitter[1] user @kingjamal08 posted a series of text messages from a wrong number. The conversation shows a grandma inviting someone who is not their grandson to thanksgiving dinner, the two sharing selfies with each other and deciding to spend Thanksgiving together regardless. The post was captioned, “Somebody grandma is coming in clutch this year!! Ayee!!!” Within one year, the tweet (shown below) received more than 15,000 retweets and 74,000 likes.


    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    Tomi Lahren’s “Food For Thought” refers to a series of photoshopped images based on a tweet by FOX News contributor Tomi Lahren featuring Colin Kaepernick photoshopped into the storming of Normandy in World War II.

    Origin

    Search Interest


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  • 11/27/17--12:46: Sebastian Gorka
  • About

    Sebastian Gorka is an American military and intelligence analyst who served as deputy adviser to President Donald Trump for the first seven months of his administration. He is known for his far-right politics and loyalty to the Make America Great Again movement, and claimed he left the White House because he thought the movement was compromised.

    History

    Gorka was born in England on October 22nd, 1970.[1] He graduated from Heythrop College at the University of London with lower-class second honors. He worked for the Hungarian Minister of Defense while getting his Masters Degree, and following the September 11th, 2001, Attacks, appeared on Hungarian television as a counterterrorism expert. In 2007, he announced his support for the Magyar Gárda, a paramilitary group run by leaders described as neo-fascist and anti-semitic by various sources (shown below).



    After lecturing and working at various institutions over the following decade, he was hired by Steve Bannon in 2014 as an editor for national security affairs for Breitbart, where he worked until 2016.

    Trump Administration

    In January of 2017, Gorka was appointed Deputy Assistant to President Trump. He was a member of the Strategic Initiatives Group with Bannon and Jared Kushner, though he never received the required security clearance to work on national security issues and the group never materialized. His appointment drew criticism from several media outlets and commentators who described Gorka as a fringe figure with anti-Islam views. His credentials were also described by several commentators as suspect. Gorka dismissed the critiques as a “proxy war” against President Trump. The White House was rumored to consider moving Gorka out of the White House in April of 2017, but Bannon and Kushner lobbied for his position. He left the White House in August. According to Gorka, he was leaving because White House officials were undermining the Make America Great Again movement. However, The White House claims Gorka was asked to leave and is not allowed back in The White House.

    Gun Collection Meme

    In November of 2017, Recoil Magazine,[2] a magazine for gun owners, published an interview with Gorka. In the interview, Gorka stated he always carries a pistol, a tourniquet, and a copy of the U.S. Constitution. On November 25th, Twitter user @RobertMaguire_[3] tweeted a link to the article along with a picture of the relevant section from the interview.

    Online Presence

    Search Interest

    External References


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    Overview

    YouTube Child Exploitation Controversy refers to the sudden closure of several YouTube accounts for posting videos of children in abusive and/or disturbing situations. The videos, which have millions of views, according to BuzzFeed’s report originated in Eastern Europe.

    Background

    Development

    Search Interest


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  • 11/27/17--13:40: Pop Tart State Traditions
  • About

    Pop Tart State Traditions refer to photos of snacks portrayed in unconventional ways, which people sarcastically claim are a delicacy in their respective states.

    Origin

    On November 10th, 2017, Twitter user @cjorgensen79[1] uploaded pictures of Pop Tarts with a slice of cheese between them. He captioned the pictures “You ain’t from Iowa if you never had one of these.” The tweet gained over 1,100 retweets and 4,000 likes (shown below).

    Spread

    Various Examples

    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References

    [1]Twitter – @cjorgensen79


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  • 11/27/17--15:27: BFG Division
  • W.I,P

    About

    BFG Division” is a song from the 2016 installment of the videogame series Doom and is one of the songs that plays while the player fights against waves of enemies in the game.
    .It’s composed by Mick Gordon who also composed the soundtrack of Wolfenstein,another game series by Id Software.

    Online Presence

    It first appeared in remixes,mashups and covers

    The song featured in several parody videos combining it with footage from cartoons and tv shows.
    Becoming as popular other songs from Doom,such as “At Doom’s Gate” and “I sawed the demons”,some of the most iconic song s of the series.

    In 23 December 2016,a video featuring the parody video:“The Slap:Part 2” and in 16 December of the same year it was uploaded a mashup with Death Grips’ song “No love” ,both gained over 100,000 views

    Various examples


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  • 11/28/17--03:04: SoulCalibur
  • (W.I.P) Accepting, any kind of help or suggestions

    About

    The SoulCalibur or Soul series (ソウルシリーズ) is a franchise of fighting games weapon-based, developed by Project Soul and Published by Namco Bandai Games.
    The story centers on a powerful and evil sword called Soul Edge a sword that, after years of bloodshed and hatred, gained a soul of its own and another Sword called Soul Calibur a sword designed to combat against it.

    History

    The first game of the Series was released on December of 1995 as an arcade game with the name of Soul Edge and a new version of the game would be release for the playstation in December of 1996 renamed Soul Blade (in North America, Europe, and Australia).
    On 1998 the second game of the series was released for the arcades,and was ported to the Dreamcast in 1999 the franchise would be known later with the name SoulCalibur.

    On 2002 SoulCalibur II was published by Namco for the arcades and ported to the PlayStation 2, GameCube, and Xbox in 2003.
    On 2005 SoulCalibur III was launched for the PlayStation 2 and a version for the arcade called SoulCalibur III: Arcade Edition, was released in 2006.

    On the year 2008 the fifth game of the series SoulCalibur IV was released for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.
    On the year 2012 Namco Bandai Games released The sixth game of the franchise SoulCalibur V for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.

    Guest characters

    One of the most Popular features of the series is the inclusion of guest characters whether they are from movies, comics or other Video Games franchises such as Link (The Legend of Zelda), Kratos (God of War), Spawn (Comic Book series), Ezio Auditore (Assassin’s Creed), Yoda, Darth Vader and The Apprentice (Star Wars) between other.


    Fandom

    (W.I.P)

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Wikipedia – SoulCalibur

    [2]Soulcalibur Wiki – Home

    [3]Facebook – SoulCalibur

    [4]Twitter – @soulcalibur

    [5]Reddit – /r/SoulCalibur/


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    About

    Melania Trump’s Christmas Decorations refers specifically to an image of a hallway in the White House as decorated by Melania Trump for the Christmas season that many joked about as being bleak and creepy as opposed to the warm and cheery decorations one might expect for the holiday season.

    Origin

    On November 26th, 2017, Melania Trump’s Communications Director Stephanie Grisham[1] tweeted an image of a hallway in the White House decorated for the holiday season. with the caption “The holidays are upon us!! Right now: flotus is seeing to every last detail here at the @WhiteHouse.” The tweet gained 950 retweets, over 3,800 likes, and over 2,700 responses.



    Spread

    Various Examples

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Twitter – @StephGrisham45


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  • 11/28/17--07:58: Me Anywhere Else
  • About

    Me Anywhere Else is a text-based comparison between the author’s feelings of a location as oppose to another. This meme has been popularized through comparisons of work and home, school and home and feelings about one’s home-state inside and outside of each respective state.

    Origin

    The earliest iteration of the format was posted on November 14th, 2011 by Twitter[1] user @SirSikora. On that day, he tweeted (shown below), “Me at school: :I Me at home: :( Me anywhere else: :)”



    Spread

    Three years later, on August 13th, 2014, Twitter[2] user @lagerthasisgone posted the first variant of “Me Anywhere Else” in references to whole cities (shown below, left).

    Days later a series of image macros using the caption “me at work vs me anywhere else,” comparing the author’s attitude toward work and home. The earliest known iteration of this variation was posted by @EvanTomMartin on August 19th. In this, a picture of Ron Swanson from the television series Parks and Recreation juxtaposed to a picture of Michael Scott of the series The Office_ (shown below, center).



    Three years later, on November 19th, 2017 Twitter[4] user @jordank1230 posted a variation that expresses how he describes his hometown in and outside the state. He tweeted, “me in Maryland: this place is the armpit of America / me anywhere else: l put Old Bay seasoning on EVERYthing. l learned how to pick crabs before l could walk. Our flag is so beautiful. l love the Chesapeake Bay. l have had sex with a blue crab.” The post (shown below) received more than 5,500 retweets and 20,000 likes in less than two weeks.



    Shortly after the tweet was posted, other users began posting similar comments with their own homes (examples below).

    Several media outlets, including BuzzFeed[5] and Mashable[6] covered the popularity of this variation.



    Various Examples




    Search Interest

    Not Available.

    External References


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  • 11/28/17--08:04: Check Out This Book I Found!
  • About

    Look At This Book I Found is an exploitable webcomic by Cyanide and Happiness in which a mother shows her daughter a book filled with mythical creatures containing a customized page depicting something the child longs for in the future.

    Origin

    On November 15th, 2017, Cyanide and Happiness published a in which a woman presents a book titled Myths to a young girl, which displays a unicorn, a fairy and a page titled “Your Soulmate” (shown below).[1]



    Spread

    On November 18th, Redditor Midnite-Wolf posted the comic with a graph labeled “EA’s investment value” to /r/MemeEconomy (shown below, left). On November 21st, a variation with a page labeled “Third Gender” was featured on /r/sjwhate[5] (shown below, right).



    On November 26th, Redditor Lukewarm5 submitted a blank template of the comic to /r/MemeEconomy[3] (shown below, left). The following day, Redditor kickro posted the comic with a chart displaying various different genders to /r/MemeEconomy[4] (shown below, right).



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References

    [1]Explosm – 4777

    [2]Reddit – /r/Animemes

    [3]Reddit – Blank meme format ready for use

    [4]Reddit – New meme format

    [5]Reddit – /r/sjwhate


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  • 11/28/17--08:40: Notice of Meme Acquisition
  • About

    Notice of Meme Acquisition refers to a series of images which are posted by internet users in response to images to notify the original posters that their images have been saved into the user’s device. The images are popular on Twitter in particular.

    Search Interest


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