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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 10/26/17--09:48: Ani
  • The plural form of anus, as stated by /u/Sir_Crimson on the subreddit /r/meirl.

    Comment from discussion me irl.

    Examples:

    “I wish the plural of anus was ani.”

    “Ani, it’s over. I have the high ground, ani.”

    “--Anakin “Lil Ani” Skywalker; I knew there was something buttholeish about that guy."


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    About

    When Another Boy Has A Balloon refers to a popular joke from Twitter paired with pictures of people pointing at an object offscreen.

    Origin

    On October 9th, 2016, Twitter user @kibblesmith[1] uploaded a picture of New Jersey governor Chris Christie pointing at an object out of frame with the caption “When another boy has a balloon,” as though he were a jealous toddler. The tweet gained over 8,000 retweets and 24,000 likes (shown below).



    Spread

    In the following months, Twitter users began applying the tweet to other pictures of people pointing. On January 8th, 2017, @BarstoolSports[2] posted a picture of Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown pointing with the caption, gaining over 160 retweets (shown below, left). On February 20th, Blink-182 bassist Mark Hoppus[3] tweeted a picture of himself with the joke, gaining 700 retweets (shown below, right).



    On February 21st, Popbuzz[4] covered the spread of the meme. Over the course of the year, people began taking the template and adding various other details to the joke depending on the subject (examples shown below).



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References


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  • 10/30/17--08:03: Made In Abyss

  • About

    Made in Abyss (Japanese: メイドインアビス Hepburn: Meido in Abisu) is a manga series written and illustrated by Akihito Tsukushi, serialized online in Takeshobo’s Web Comic Gamma and later adapted into an anime series by Kinema Citrus. The story is set in a world where humanities’ last frontier is a great pit known as the Abyss and follows the adventure of Riko, a young girl who finds and befriends a humanoid robot and descends with him into the Abyss in search of her mother.

    History

    The manga was first serialized on Takeshobo’s Web Comic Gamma website in 2012 before the first volume was released in July 31, 2013. Since then, the series has been compiled into six tankōbon volumes as of July 29, 2017. Seven Seas Entertainment announced during their panel at Anime Expo 2017 that they had licensed the manga in North America with the first volume being published in January 2, 2018.


    An anime adaptation was announced by Kinema Citrus in December 2016 and aired from July 7 to September 29, 2017.

    Reception

    As of October 29, the anime has a score of 8.6 on IMDB and an 8.9 on MyAnimeList. The manga recieved a score of 9.1 on MyAnimeList.

    Online Relevance

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/30/17--08:48: Hamilkin
  • About

    Hamilkin refers to a subculture of people who identify with characters from the musical Hamilton to the point where they believe they are those characters, spiritually.

    Definition

    Hamilkin is a part of the Factkin subculture, itself a part of the Otherkin[1] subculture. In the Otherkin subculture, people believe they are spiritually or genetically non-human, and are confined to a human form. In the Factkin subculture, people identify with people who have lived on Earth. For example, according to Tumblr user conceptkin,[2]“Someone who believes they were Abraham Lincoln in a past life, or someone who shares a spiritual link with Chris Evans, (etc) would be factkin.” Hamilkin identify with cast members of the 2015 Broadway musical, Hamilton.

    History

    Mentions of “Hamilkin” began appearing as early as spring of 2016. On March 31st, 2016, a piece of Hamiltonfanfiction posted on Archive Of Our Own[3] by Angsty_boy mentioned that the idea for the piece was inspired by “hamilkin chat.”

    2017 Fanfiction Drama

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Wikipedia – Otherkin

    [2]Tumblr – conceptkin

    [3]Archive Of Our Own – For Shame


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  • 10/30/17--09:56: Chicago Bean Facebook Events
  • About

    Chicago Bean Facebook Events refer to a series of parody Facebook event invite pages on for various tongue-in-cheek gatherings at the Chicago public art landmark “Cloud Gate,” known colloquially as the “Chicago Bean.”

    Origin

    Search Interest


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  • 10/30/17--10:10: Pee Is Stored in the Balls
  • About

    Pee Is Stored in the Balls is a satirical factoid falsely claiming that men hold urine within their testicles. Online, the phrase is typically used as a humorous caption in various image macros.

    Origin

    On December 4th, 2013, Twitter user @J_M_Cook[1] tweeted the question “Is pee stored in the balls? #BonerQuestions” (shown below). The following day, the tweet was included in an article titled “What’s the Deal With Boners” on the women’s interest site Cosmopolitan.[2]



    Spread

    Also on December 5th, 2013, model Christine Teigen tweeted the question, which gathered upwards of 5,000 likes and 2,400 retweets over the next four years.[6]



    On May 13th, 2014, Redditor BottomOfTheBarrel submitted a post asking about the phrase to /r/OutOfTheLoop.[3]

    On March 29th, 2017, Twitter user @cushbomb tweeted a joke about urine being stored “in the balls” (shown below).



    On August 22nd, 2017, Instagram user aynalswag[4] posted a photograph of Winston Churchill with the fake quote “Pee is stored in the balls” (shown below, left). On September 18th, the Short Nigga Memes Facebook page posted a picture of a Guy Fawkes Mask captioned with “pee is stored in the balls” (shown below, right).



    On September 26th, the “Pee is stored in the balls” Facebook[5] page was created. On October 23rd, Redditor RazorJakeNWO posted a Snapple Facts photoshop with the message “Pee is stored in the balls” (shown below, left). Within one week, the post gained over 3,500 points on /r/dankmemes[7] (97% upvoted). On October 30th, Redditor Sweeney49 posted a photograph of Canadian actor Finn Wolfhard with the caption “If pee is stored in the balls, does that mean girls don’t pee?” to /r/dankmemes[8] (shown below, right).



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/30/17--11:12: Chowder
  • About

    Chowder is a animated series series created by C. H. Greenblatt about a young child named Chowder who dreams of becoming a chef someday that aired on Cartoon Network between 2007 and 2010.

    Premise

    The series follows an aspiring young child named Chowder and his day-to-day adventures as an apprentice in Chef Mung Daal’s catering company. Although he means well, Chowder often finds himself in predicaments due to his perpetual appetite and his nature as a scatterbrain.


    History

    During his time working on Nickelodeon’s SpongeBob SquarePants, Greenblatt had been sketching various characters for his own animation series concept. Greenblatt originally based the premise on the idea of the sorcerer’s apprentice style of story, such as The Sword in the Stone. The plot devices were modified so that the story revolves around a master chef who teaches his young apprentice how to cook. Chowder himself was developed with no specific species in mind, but rather with the intentions of invoking the image of a child’s soft squeeze toy. Some of the inspiration comes from Dr. Seuss, with other inspiration from Saturday morning cartoons. Greenblatt pitched the concept to Cartoon Network, and two years later the series was approved with another year for production before the pilot episode aired. Greenblatt estimates he spent about seven years working on Chowder before the show made it to air in 2007.

    Reception

    Barry Garron of The Hollywood Reporter thought that the show would appeal to children and adults alike, using exotic artwork, unusual settings, and a zany cast of characters. On Toon Zone, Ed Liu expands on the animation and crazy antics of the characters, pointing that “the humor is kid-friendly without being juvenile” and praising it for getting laughs, “without resorting to an excess of toilet humor, even if Chowder’s pet happens to be a sentient fart cloud.” Aaron H. Bynum on Animation Insider wrote, “Featuring brightly colored environments, stylishly matted/fixed background artwork and humorously designed characters with unique personalities to boot, Chowder is one of the networks largest creative accomplishments in recent years.”

    Related Memes

    OH NO! IT ALLWENTWRONG!!

    OH NO! IT ALLWENTWRONG!! is memorable quote by Chowder from an episode of Chowder. Online, people have used the scene as a the inspiration for YouTube remixes.


    Search Internet


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  • 10/30/17--11:37: Durgesh and Sanjay
  • About

    Durgesh refers to a set of viral Instagram posts in which a man identified as Sanjay Kapoor claims to be repeatedly catfished by an older man named Durgesh. After screenshots began widely circulating in late October 2017, a man came forward on Facebook claiming they the photographs were actually of a son and his disabled father.

    Origin

    On October 26th, 2017, Instagram user @sanjayyy_kapoor[1] posted a series of photographs captioned with claims that he had been catfished by an older man named Durgesh several times, leading him to assault the man (shown below).



    Spread

    That day, Twitter user @Tazznemo[5] posted screenshots of the posts along with the message “My favourite Instagram account.” Within four days, the tweet gathered more than 258,800 likes and 105,500 retweets. Meanwhile, Imgur[10] user fatherofpenguinmafia reposted the screenshots, which accumulated upwards of 213800 views and 5,800 points over the next 72 hours. On October 27th, Twitter user @WidefaceViki[6] posted a Who’s That Pokemon photoshop featuring Sanjay and Durgesh (shown below).



    That day, Redditor mrdoddsi submitted the Instagram screenshots to /r/indianpeoplefacebook,[11] where they received upwards of 4,200 points (95% upvoted) and 140 comments over the next three days. On October 28th, 2017, Facebook user Sudhanshu Pandey published a post claiming that the photos were of his brother Durgesh with his 51-year-old disabled father Sanjay.



    The following day, the original Instagram screenshots were posted in a thread on 4chan’s /int/ board.[4] Meanwhile, /r/IndianPeopleFacebook[7] moderator atticus94 submitted a post ordering users to “stop using the Durgesh meme” in light of Sudhanshu Pandey’s Facebook post. Also on October 29th, Redditor noggerfaggit posted a photoshopped series of Scooby Doo screencaptures featuring Durgesh and Sanjay to /r/dankmemes[8] (shown below). On October 30th, 2017, the internet news site Storypick[9] published an article titled “Viral ‘Durgesh’ Meme Is Actually A 16 YO Boy And His Disabled Father.”



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/30/17--12:11: Grain Entrapment
  • About

    Grain Entrapment refers to when a person gets submerged in grain when the pile of grain they were standing on, like quicksand. The phenomenon has been joked about online for several years before growing in popularity in late 2017.

    Origin

    On September 23rd, 2013, Tumblr user @aglaja,[1] since deactivated, posted an illustration of the grain entrapment phenomenon, gaining over 70,000 notes (shown below).

    Spread

    Various Examples

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Meme Documentation – aglaja


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  • 10/30/17--12:13: Burger Emoji Debate
  • About

    Burger Emoji Debate refers to an online conversation about the build on the cheeseburger emoji, i.e. where the components of the burger appear in the digital illustration.

    Origin

    On October 28th, 2017, Twitter[1] user @baekdal tweeted a picture of Apple and Google’s burger emojis with the caption “I think we need to have a discussion about how Google’s burger emoji is placing the cheese underneath the burger, while Apple puts it on top.” The post (shown below) received more than 19,000 retweets and 39,000 likes in two days.



    Spread

    The following day, Twitter[2] user @KeiyosX tweeted a diagram of a burger build in response to users discussing what the proper way to stack toppings. The post (shown below, left) received more than 340 retweets and 2,400 likes in less than two days. Additionally, Twitter[3] user @MarkGoodge[4] tweeted, “They’re both wrong. Google’s cheese is wrong, Apple’s lettuce is wrong. The correct order, from bottom up, is burger – cheese – toppings.” The post (shown below, right) received more than 400 retweets and 1,700 likes in 48 hours.



    That day, Google CEO Sundar Pichai weighed in on Twitter.[4] He said, “Will drop everything else we are doing and address on Monday:) if folks can agree on the correct way to do this!” The post (shown below) received more than 15,000 retweets and 40,000 likes in two days.

    The following day, Twitter[5] published a Moments page about the debate, which received more than 1,300 likes. Several news outlets covered the debate, including USA Today,[6]CNN,[7] Business Insider[8] and more.



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/30/17--13:19: Sheriff Hopper Dancing
  • h2. About

    Sheriff Hopper Dancing refers to a series of remix video in which people online overdub an infamous dance scene from Stranger Things season two with different music.

    Origin

    On October 27th, 2017, the second season of Stranger Things premiered on Netflix] In episode three, “Chapter Three: The Pollywog,” the character Sheriff Hopper (David Harbour) dances to Jim Croce’s “You Don’t Mess Around” while cleaning his cabin with the character Eleven.

    The following day, the official Stranger Things Twitter[2] account posted a gif of the moment with the caption “Do the Hopper.” The post (shown below) received more than 15,000 retweets and 48,000 likes in less than two days.




    Spread

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/30/17--20:48: Sad Howdy Boy
  • Sad Howdy Boy is an emoji mashup combining Face With Cowboy Hat and Pensive Face attributed to @Dintrification

    On May 31, 2017, a number of vector graphics with the Sad Howdy Boy theme appeared on ColourBox.com for purchase.

    On October 18, 2017, the original Sad Howdy Boy designed Dintrification by was retweeted by "lettucechair":https://twitter.com/lettucechair/status/920881583602647040, garnering 20,297 retweets and 56,161 likes.

    On October 20, 2017, a comic strip based on Overwatch was posted to knowyourmeme featuring a child or young-adult cowboy emoting the phrase ‘sad yeehawing’ – whether or not this was inspired by Sad Howdy Boy is debatable.

    On October 28, 2017, @sivanswift tweeted photos of an in-progress and completed and lit jack ’o lantern of Sad Howdy Boy, referred to as “Sad Cowboy”


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    Overview

    Kevin Spacey Sexual Assault Allegations refer to the controversy surrounding Academy Award-winning actor Kevin Spacey’s alleged illicit advances toward a 14-year-old male. Following the allegations, Spacey apologized but was criticized for using his apology letter to come out as a homosexual.

    Background

    While Spacey’s relationship with young men has been reported in the gossip website Gawker[1][2] since as early as 2014, the story became a national news story following actor Anthony Rapp’s interview with BuzzFeed. [3] In the interview, Rapp alleges that Spacey made sexual advances toward a then 14-year-old Rapp. The articles says:

    “In 1986, Spacey befriended Rapp while they both performed on Broadway shows, invited Rapp over to his apartment for a party, and, at the end of the night, picked Rapp up, placed him on his bed, and climbed on top of him, making a sexual advance. According to public records, Spacey was 26. Rapp was 14.”

    Development

    Spacey’s Response

    After the story broke, Spacey responded to the allegations on Twitter. [4] The tweet (shown below) received more than 29,000 retweets and 77,000 likes in less than two days.



    “I have a lot of respect and admiration for Anthony Rapp as an actor. I’m beyond horrified to hear this story. I honestly do not remember the encounter, it would have been over 30 years ago. But if I did behave as he describes, I owe him the sincerest apology for what would have been deeply inappropriate drunken behavior, and I am sorry for the feelings he describes having carried with him all these years.

    “This story has encourage me to address other things about my life. I know that there are stories out there about me and that have been fueled by the fact that I have been so protective of my privacy. As those closest to me know, in my life I have had relationships with both men and women. I have loved and had romantic encounters with men throughout my life, and I choose now to live as a gay man. I want to deal with this honestly and openly and that starts with examining my own behavior.

    - Kevin Spacey"

    Related Memes

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/31/17--08:06: Antifa Supersoldier Hoax
  • About

    Antifa Supersoldier Hoax refers to a sarcastic tweet by Twitter user @KrangTNelson that said on November 4th, 2017, a group of “Antifa supersoldiers” would “behead all white parents and small business owners in the town square.” Despite the obvious sarcasm behind the tweet, it went viral among some right wing Twitter users as sincere, and led to @KrangTNelson’s brief suspension from Twitter. The situation led to jokes about the concept of “Antifa supersoldiers.”

    Origin

    On October 27th, 2017, Twitter user @KrangTNelson tweeted “can’t wait for November 4th when millions of antifa supersoldiers will behead all white parents and small business owners in the town square” (shown below). The tweet was meant to parody the perception of Antifa as an ultra-violent group.



    Spread

    Despite the tweet’s obvious sarcasm, it was taken literally by some on the right. Krang showed a compilation of tweets of people quote-tweeting his tweet and taking it seriously (shown below).



    These people also reported the tweet to Twitter, leading to KrangTNelson’s suspension on October 30th. This in turn led to his supporters posting his tweet, though they did not face the same punishment (example shown below).



    This led conservative media outlet Gateway Pundit[1] to report on the supposed ultra-violent Antifa plans as though it were serious, though they later updated their piece to admit they did not see it was a joke. The overreaction by the right led to multiple jokes on Twitter about “Antifa supersoldiers” and KrangTNelson’s eventual lifted suspension. Most jokes about Antifa Supersoldiers involved the group supposedly preparing to do ludicrous things (examples shown below).



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/31/17--08:09: Ice Poseidon
  • About

    Ice Poseidon is the online handle of vlogger and livestreamer Paul Denino, best known for streaming the game Runescape and for broadcasting various real-life pranks.

    History

    Twitch Channel

    YouTube Channel

    On May 31st, 2017, Denino posted a video titled “Speed Dating College Girls (Police Called For Hate Speech)”, in which he set up a speed dating booth to mock students at the University of California, Los Angeles (shown below, left). On July 20th, 2017, he uploaded footage from a livestream in which he accumulated upwards of $5,000 while sleeping for eight hours (shown below, right). Within three months, the video received more than 1.8 million views and 4,500 comments.



    Controversies

    Swatting

    News Media Coverage

    On June 9th, 2017, Rolling Stone published an article about Denino titled “On Air With LA’s Most Wanted Man, ‘Life Streamer’ Ice Poseidon,”

    Personal Life

    Denino grew up in Palm Beach, Florida

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/31/17--09:32: Pretzels Is the Same
  • About

    Pretzels Is The Same refers to an exploitable image taken from The Eric Andre Show in which Hannibal Burress reviews various pretzel brands, concluding that they’re all similar and saying “Pretzels is the same.” It became an exploitable in which people compare various things that are similar and write “X is the same.”

    Origin

    On October 10th, 2013, Hannibal Burress reviewed pretzels in a segment on The Eric Andre Show (shown below).[1] After trying a couple, he says “These are all pretty good. What is this segment? Pretzels is the same?”



    Spread

    On December 28th, 2014, Tumblr user ghoulgoblin520[2] uploaded GIFs of the scene

    Various Examples

    Search Interest

    External References


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    http://alphamovies.xyz/
    http://alphamovies.xyz/
    http://alphamovies.xyz/


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  • 10/27/17--12:49: Ciao Ryan
  • About

    Ciao Ryan refers to University of Louisiana Lafayette student Ryan Scott who became popular in a viral video for saying goodbye to a fellow college student with “Ciao.”

    Origin

    On October 15th, 2017, Twitter user @Tslight_24, real name Thomas, uploaded a video of himself interacting with Scott several times. At the end of each interaction, Scott says “Ciao” (shown below). The tweet gained over 177,000 retweets and 464,000 likes in two weeks.




    Spread

    The video quickly attracted comparisons to Damn Daniel. The Tab[2] posted an article about Ciao Ryan on October 16th, including various commenters making the connection. On October 18th, Twitter user @corutny703[1] posted a You vs. The Guy She Told You Not To Worry About joke comparing Damn Daniel and Ciao Ryan, gaining over 3,900 retweets (shown below).



    Meanwhile, Twitter users began using Ryan as a reaction image for situations in which one leaves abruptly. On October 17th, Twitter user @memeprovider[3] posted such a joke and gained over 65,000 retweets and 156,000 likes.



    Since becoming well known, Scott told the Tab[4] that he has been approached on campus, saying, “I have more people coming up to me and chatting, and I honestly feel so great.” He also reports that he and Thomas are now friends in real life. The story has been covered by Buzzfeed[5] and The Daily Dot.[6]



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    “If I Had More Time, I Would Have Written a Shorter Letter” is an infamously misattributed quote that highlights the importance of brevity and editing in writing.

    Origin

    The earliest recorded use of the quote “If I Had More Time, I Would Have Written a Shorter Letter” comes from French mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal’s work “Lettres Provinciales” in 1657.[1] Written in French the quote says, “Je n’ai fait celle-ci plus longue que parce que je n’ai pas eu le loisir de la faire plus courte.” This translates to “I have made this longer than usual because I have not had time to make it shorter.”

    Spread

    About 20 years later, the quote was used in the book The Art of Speaking, where it was translated to “These inventions require much wit, and application; and therefore it was, that Mons. Pascal (an author very famous for his felicity in comprising much in few words) excused himself wittily for the extravagant length of one of his letters, by saying, he had not time to make it shorter.”[2]



    In 1690, philosopher John Locke included a variation of the quote in the preface to his work “An Essay Concerning Human Understanding.”[3] The preface, entitled “The Epistle to the Readers,” features and explanation for the length of the essay with this statement:

    “I will not deny, but possibly it might be reduced to a narrower Compass than it is; and that some Parts of it might be contracted: The way it has been writ in, by Catches, and many long Intervals of Interruption, being apt to cause some Repetitions. But to confess the Truth, I am now too lazy, or too busy to make it shorter.”

    Sixty years later, Benjamin Franklin wrote the quote in a letter to the Royal Society in London regarding his experiments on electricity entitled “New Experiments and Observations on Electricity Made at Philadelphia in America” (shown below, left).[4] He said, “I have already made this paper too long, for which I must crave pardon, not having now time to make it shorter.”

    Nearly 100 years later, in 1857, author Henry David Thoreau used the quote in a letter to a friend (shown below, right), saying, “Not that the story need be long, but it will take a long while to make it short.”[5]



    In 1871, Mark Twain included a version of the quote in a letter to a friend.[6] He wrote, “You’ll have to excuse my lengthiness--the reason I dread writing letters is because I am so apt to get to slinging wisdom & forget to let up. Thus much precious time is lost.”

    Nearly 50 years later, in 1919, President Woodrow Wilson responded to a question about how long he spent preparing speeches with a variation.[7] He said, “That depends on the length of the speech. If it is a ten-minute speech it takes me all of two weeks to prepare it; if it is a half-hour speech it takes me a week; if I can talk as long as I want to it requires no preparation at all. I am ready now.”

    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    Where Do You See Yourself in Ten Years? is a common question asked in job interviews. Online, the question is paired with humorous images which serve as the answer to the question.

    Origin

    One of the earliest, humorous online references to the question appeared in a Cyanide and Happiness comic[1] posted December 22nd, 2009 featured a person answering the question in a job interview for “Smartasses Incorporated” (shown below).



    Spread

    In the following years, the phrase began appearing in advice animals such as Lazy College Senior and Overly Attached Girlfriend (shown below).



    The phrase began appearing as a caption paired with humorous pictures in the summer of 2015. It was around this time a drawing of a man having wine with his cat paired with the caption began circulating online (shown below, left), as did an image of a woman walking with a stroller filled with dogs (shown below, right).



    Jokes began appearing more regularly over the course of the following two years. Gurl[2] compiled a list of 15 variations on the joke on November 28th, 2016. The joke continues to be popular on Tumblr[3] and Twitter.[4]

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References


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