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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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    Overview

    Mayim Bialik’s New York Times Editorial refers to the reaction and controversy created by the actor’s op-ed, which the Times published in regards to the exposure of the sexual harassment and assault allegations against Harvey Weinstein. Bialik, the star of the hit television program The Big Bang Theory, wrote about the treatment of young women in Hollywood and made several comments styles of appearance, which some online perceived as victim blaming.

    Background

    On October 13th, 2017, the New York Times[1] published an editorial by Big Bang Theory actor Mayim Bialik, which details her experience in Hollywood and her thoughts on the Harvey Weinstein sexual harassment and assault allegations. The essay, which tells of Bilaik’s experience in Hollywood, explains her views on sexual harassment and assault, and seems to ask young women to consider their own dress. She writes:

    “And yet I have also experienced the upside of not being a “perfect ten.” As a proud feminist with little desire to diet, get plastic surgery or hire a personal trainer, I have almost no personal experience with men asking me to meetings in their hotel rooms. Those of us in Hollywood who don’t represent an impossible standard of beauty have the “luxury” of being overlooked and, in many cases, ignored by men in power unless we can make them money.

    I still make choices every day as a 41-year-old actress that I think of as self-protecting and wise. I have decided that my sexual self is best reserved for private situations with those I am most intimate with. I dress modestly. I don’t act flirtatiously with men as a policy.

    I am entirely aware that these types of choices might feel oppressive to many young feminists. Women should be able to wear whatever they want. They should be able to flirt however they want with whomever they want. Why are we the ones who have to police our behavior?

    In a perfect world, women should be free to act however they want. But our world isn’t perfect. Nothing -- absolutely nothing -- excuses men for assaulting or abusing women. But we can’t be naïve about the culture we live in."

    Developments

    Backlash

    The day after the Times published the piece, many on Twitter began posting rebuttles to Bialik’s arguments. On October 14th, Academy Award-winning actress Patricia Arquette tweeted[2]“.@missmayim I have to say I was dressed non provocatively at 12 walking home from school when men masturbated at me. It’s not the clothes.” She then followed that tweet with another, reading, “It is also not outrageous for anyone to expected to be treated in a professional matter by anyone in a professional relationship.” Within two days, the first tweet (shown below, left) received more than 4,400 retweets and 26,000 likes, and the second tweet received more than 1,300 retweets and 9,600 likes.



    That day, Twitter[3] user @eveewing posted a quote from the op-ed and said Bialik’s comments were “placing blame on victims.” She continued, “‘I have decided that my sexual self is best reserved for private situations with those I am most intimate with. I dress modestly.’ This is disgusting. @missmayim is placing blame on victims and forgetting that rape and assault are about power, not about desire.” The post (shown below) received more than 9,200 retweets and 26,000 likes in two days.



    As the comments and responses to the op-ed mounted, Twitter[4] published a Moments page on the response. As of October 17th, the page has received more than 1,400 likes.

    The op-ed became the subject of numerous threads on Reddit, with posts on /r/TwoXChromosomes,[5] /r/GamerGhazi,[6] /r/GenderCritical[7] and more.

    Mayim Bialk’s Response

    On October 15th, Bialik responded to the backlash, promising to do a live question and answer with the Times on Monday, October 16th. In a tweet, she posted an image featuring the text:

    “I’m being told my N.Y. Times piece resonated with so many and I am beyond grateful for all of the feedback. I also see a bunch of people have taken my words out of the context of the Hollywood machine and twisted them to imply that God forbid I would blame a woman for her assault based on her clothing or behavior. anyone who knows me and my feminism knows that’s absurd and not at all what this piece was about. it’s so sad how vicious people are being when I basically live to make things better for women. I am doing a Facebook live with the N.Y. Times Monday morning. lets discuss it then.”

    Within 24 hours, the post on Twitter[11] received more than 800 retweets, 5,300 likes and 2,700 comments. On Facebook, [12] the post received more than 7,300 reactions, 120 shares and 800 comments.



    The follow morning, Bialik hosted the live q & a on Facebook.[13] The video (shown below) received more than 830 reactions, 170 shares and 178,000 views within an hour of posting.



    Media Coverage

    Additionally, several news outlets covered the controversy, referring primarily to the criticism as “victim blaming,” including CNN,[8] Fox,[9] The Chicago Tribune[10] and more.

    External References


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    About

    Coffee, You’re My Only Friend refers to a series of “exploitable” webcomics based on a six-panel comic by RaphComic. The comic sees a person talking to their coffee, however, when the coffee reveals to intense a truth, the person pours some milk in the coffee to get a lighter take on the subject.

    Origin

    On August 26th, 2017, Raph Comics published a six-panel webcomic on Facebook, [1]Twitter, [2]Tumblr[3] and Instagram] Within two months, the Facebook post had garnered more than 480 retweets 2,600 shares and 120 comments.



    Spread

    Four days later, on August 30ths, a variation of the meme was posted to Imgur .[5] In this version, which utilizes racist stereotypes of Indian Americans and African Americans, the coffee says “fuck white people” instead of “friends are meaningless in the landscape of time” and “send bobs and vagene” instead of “friends remind us that we’re not dead.” The post (shown below, left) received more than 230 views before being taken down.

    On October 16th, Redditor[6] rcmaehl posted a variation in the subreddit /r/pcmasterrace. The post features the coffee saying “you don’t need an i7 [processor] to game” and “The i7 provides better FPS than the i5.” Within 24 hours, the post (shown below, center) received more than 19,000 points (88% upvoted) and 900 comments.

    That day, Redditor[7] SuperscalarMemer posted a variant in the /r/ProgrammerHumor subreddit. In this version, the coffee says “The C programming language is archaic and useless in 2017” and "Albeit an old language, C is still relevant for systems programming. The post (shown below, right) received more than 20,000 points (89% upvoted) and 1,100 comments in 24 hours.

    The format became popular on the /r/MemeEconomy subreddit, where it received multiple threads about its vitality as a meme.[8][9][10][11]



    Search Interest

    Not Available.

    External References


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  • 10/16/17--11:34: No Pomegranates
  • About

    No Pomegranates refers to a viral video of a university professor loudly ranting about the pomegranate fruit during a lesson in developmental psychology.

    Origin

    On October 11th, 2017, Twitter user @tdubs23 posted a Snapchat video titled “No pomegranates,” featuring footage of Dr. Jane Martino loudly yelling about pomegranate fruits (shown below). Within five days, the tweet received more than 181,000 likes and 79,300 retweets.




    Spread

    On October 12th, 2017, YouTuber Jan N reuploaded the video, which garnered . That day, Redditor MapleLeafsFan3 submitted the video to /r/youtubehaiku,[1] where it received upwards of 19,700 points (93% upvoted) and 550 comments within four days. That day, Twitter user @deeejaaay25 tweeted the explanation that the video was taken during a developmental psychology class on teaching young children “to dislike/like something” (shown below).



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/16/17--11:47: Olive Garden Fanfiction
  • About

    Olive Garden Fanfiction refers to fanfiction written about the American Italian-food chain Olive Garden after a challenge was issued by a food reviewer on Twitter after she wrote an artistic and literary review of the chain.

    Origin

    On October 3rd, food critic Helen Rosner published a review of Olive Garden for Eater.com[1] as the chain attempts to rebrand itself for a modern consumer marketplace. Her review delved into her personal relationship with the chain restaurant, as well as parsed out the theoretical and artistic value of Olive Garden’s mundaneness and mediocrity. For example, Rosner wrote of Olive Garden, “It’s the ur-chain, a restaurant whose exquisite mediocrity -- heightened, not undermined, by the flashes of greatness in the toasted ravioli, the salad, the shockingly delicious soups -- is the very fabric of its appeal.” She also wrote how because all Olive Garden’s are fundamentally similar despite regional differences, “There is really only one Olive Garden, one Olive Garden that has a thousand doors.”

    Spread

    Struck by the artistry of the review, Twitter user @drhypercube[2] tweeted Rosner, “‘There is only one Olive Garden, but it has a thousand doors.’ One could hang a scifi/horror story off this line. (A+++).”



    In response to that tweet, Rosner tweeted “Holy crap I will buy dinner for 4 at Olive Garden for anyone who writes a real short story with this as the opening line.”[3] She then tweeted some guidelines for her challenge, making sure she wanted the story to be about a world with one thousand-doored Olive Garden.



    In response, Rosner has received at least nine pieces of fanfiction using the line “There is only one Olive Garden, but it has a thousand doors.” as the opening sentence. The Daily Dot[4] compiled some of excerpts from submissions and posted them on October 14th, 2017 (shown below).

    The shell of the Olive Garden beast keeps each chamber apart, keeps the denizens from mingling, but the back of the beast runs through them all. It twists in those dark directions our three dimensional mind knows not. Ana and Kata, Ceriden and Quariden. It spins and turns, passing through vast holes in what, to our small minds, seem solid walls painted in yellow tones and festooned with fake rock slabs. --

    Deborah looked away, the way she always did when she didn’t want to engage, and walked back to her table. She ate a breadstick, and drank a glass of red wine that tasted tangy on her tongue as she picked at the chicken alfredo she ordered. But afterwards, once she had paid the bill, she couldn’t help herself and went to look one more time. And that time, she took another turn into a second dining room she had missed before, and when she opened the door she saw the unmistakeable, flat vastness of a midwestern strip mall. --

    We could interact with, but didn’t appear to be physically in the Olive Garden. It’s hard to explain. The staff and patrons paid us no mind as we ate their food, flipped their cups and put linguini on their heads. --

    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References


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  • 10/16/17--12:34: Evan Dudenhefer
  • Evan Dudenhefer is a meme because his entire existence is one big meme. He spilled tea at Cookout and just stared at it. He is a trash can. He is a massive scrub but a lovable one.


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    About

    She’s Beautiful. Who Is? The Girl Reading This is a phrase featured in image macros intended to surprise a girl seeing the image by breaking the fourth wall and calling her beautiful. It became the subject of ironic iterations in the mid-2010s due to its cringeworthy nature.

    Origin

    The phrase has appeared in various iterations for several years. For example, an image employing the concept was tweeted on June 5th, 2012 by @RileyRainbow01[1] (shown below).



    Ironic iterations began being posted a few years later. On September 19th, 2015, Weird Facebook page Unexpected Memes posted a version where the phrase was posted with a picture of John Cena, gaining about 1,300 likes and reactions (shown below).



    Spread

    Increasingly ironic versions of the image macro began appearing more frequently over the following years. On June 5th, 2017, Facebook page Infinite Doggo Memes[2] published a version which featured a white dog saying the phrase (shown below, left). Another version which featured various famous Let’s Players circulated around various cringe-related subreddits at the beginning of 2017 and was compiled by Mututally.[3]



    The meme also some variations where the compliment was changed to an insult. On May 12th, 2017, Instagram account sofishticated_ uploaded an edit of the John Cena version which flipped the message, gaining over 980 likes (shown below, left). Another version posted by Instagram user 35k._ changed the punchline to Smash The Like gained 68 likes (shown below, right).



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References


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  • 10/16/17--19:14: Mii Channel Theme
  • About

    Mii Channel Music is a song for the Mii Channel that came out on the Nintendo Wii. The theme made various of remixes and parodies.

    Origin

    The song came out in the Nintendo console the Wii, in the Mii Channel.



    Spread

    The first remix video is made by UniversalVGMusicians on Jan 18, 2011 and it gain 2,696 views and 11 Comments



    Various Examples



    Search Internet


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  • 10/17/17--07:39: Ariana Grandeing
  • About

    Ariana Grandeing is a photo fad in which people attempt to recreate Ariana Grande’sMy Everything album cover. Starting on Twitter, the trend shows people attempting to prove whether or not Grande’s position on a stool on the cover is physically possible.

    Origin

    On October 15th, 2017, Twitter[1] user @McJesse posted a picture of himself failing to recreate Ariana Grande’s My Everything album cover. He captioned the post “I’ve done the research and there’s no way her ass is sitting on that stool.” The tweet (shown below) received more than 100,000 retweets and 329,000 likes in two days.



    Spread

    Shortly after McJesse’s post, his followers began responding with their own attempts of recreating Grande’s album cover (examples below).



    The following day, singer and recording artist Ariana Grande responded to the trend on Twitter.[2] She retweeted @McJesse’s original tweet with the caption “next week on mythbusters.” The post (shown below) received more than 144,000 retweets and 600,000 likes in less than 24 hours.

    In response to Grande’s tweet, Twitter published a Moments page, archiving the attempts and debate surrounding the album cover.



    Various Examples




    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/17/17--07:59: Oh My How Lewd
  • About

    Oh My How Lewd is a video remix series based on a clip from the anime

    Origin

    On July 25th. 2015, YouTuber Frolicks uploaded a clip of the scene, which gathered upwards of 178,000 views and 260 comments over the next three years (shown below).



    Spread

    On May 23rd, 2016, YouTuber Dogeborn uploaded a captioned version of the clip (shown below, left). On December 13th, YouTuber A Psychotic on Narcotics uploaded a ""We Are Number One"": remix featuring the “Oh My How Lewd” scene (shown below, right).



    On March 6th, 2017, YouTuber Cooltato uploaded a remix of the scene which received upwards of 116,000 views and 430 comments over the next eight months (shown below).


    <br.

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/17/17--08:12: Roll Tide
  • About

    Roll Tide is a rallying cry among fans of the University of Alabama’s sports teams, particularly its football team, known as the Crimson Tide. Its ubiquity has been propagated by several viral videos in which people getting arrested say the phrase.

    Origin

    The origins of the phrase are unclear.[1] A fanpost on Alabama football blog Roll Bama Roll suggests a sea shanty sung on the CSS Alabama called “Roll Alabama Roll” may have influenced the origin of the phrase, but there’s no evidence connecting it to the phrase “Roll Tide.” Online, it first appeared on Urban Dictionary on March 12th, 2004,[2] with a satirical definition mocking University of Alabama students. A year later, on March 11th, 2005, a more straightforward definition was added (shown below).

    Spread

    Various Examples

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Roll Bama Roll – "The Mysterious Origins of the Phrase Roll Tide

    [2]Urban Dictionary – First Roll Tide Definition

    [3]Urban Dictionary – Top Roll Tide Definition


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    About

    What’s the Matter, Little Fella? refers to a series of two-panel exploitables featuring the video game character Cuphead. In the meme, Cuphead, or character standing in for Cuphead, asks “What’s the matter, little fella?” before answering the question with something antagonistic, similar to What’s Wrong, Big Boy?

    Origin

    On October 4th, 2017, Facebook[1] user Rammari posted a two-panel image of Cuphead. In the first panel, Cuphead says, “What’s the matter, little fella?” Underneath, in the second panel, Cuphead says, “Bad at video games?” The post (shown below) received more than 2,000 shares, 440 comments and 10,300 shares in two weeks.



    Spread

    That day, the image was shared on the 4chan/v/ board[2] by an anonnymous user and Twitter, [3] where user @GamingAndPandas received more than 6,300 retweets 17,000 likes in two weeks.

    The following day, Redditor[4] KaiserRolled posted a variation in the /r/NLSSCircleJerk subreddit. This version features a man’s face superimposed over Cuphead’s and the word “acquiescing” over "video games. The post (shown below, left) recieved more than 219 points (99% upvoted) in two weeks.

    Three days later, on October 8th, Twitter[5] user @Shadbase posted another version, where the bottom question reads, “Never had your cock sucked by a cup before?” The post (shown below, right) received more than 1,100 retweets and 6,200 likes in one week.



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/17/17--09:46: Eat The Child
  • About

    Eat The Child is a Tumblr phrasal meme made in parody of advertisements for role-playing mobile games which require players to make difficult decisions.

    Origin

    On September 15th, 2017, Tumblr user ryanphantom[1] responded to a sponsored advertisement from thewalkingdeadroadtosurvival[2] promoting their mobile game based on The Walking Dead. The advertisement presents a scenario where you have one meal to share between yourself and a small child. ryanphantom replied to the advertisement by saying “EATTHECHILD” (shown below).



    Spread

    Various Examples

    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References


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  • 10/17/17--10:39: Three Words, Eight Letters
  • About

    Three Words, Eight Letters, is an image macro series featuring a picture of the characters Chuck Bass and Blair Waldorf from the television series Gossip Girl looking into each other’s eyes captioned with variations of phrase “Three words. Eight letters. Say it, and I’m yours.”

    Origin

    On September 1st, 2008, the Season 2 Episode 1 of the television series Gossip Girl was released, in which the character Blair Waldorf asks love interest Chuck Bass to tell her she loves her in order to stay with him (shown below).



    Blair Waldorf: The true reason I should stay right where I am and not get in the car, three words, eight letters… say it and I’m yours.
    Chuck Bass: I… I…
    Blair Waldorf: Thank you. That’s all I needed to hear.

    Spread

    On November 27th, 2012, the @9gag[4] Twitter feed tweeted the Gossip Girl line followed by the joke “I got food” (shown below).



    On May 9th, 2017, the UnexpectedMemes Facebook[3] pages uploaded a version of the image macro featuring the “Lemme Smash” bird (shown below). On July 31st, 2017, Redditor 3personsouth reuploaded the image to /r/funny,[1] where it gained over 3,900 points (90% upvoted) and 200 comments in two months.



    On August 13th, Redditor molnix posted the image macro combined with a picture of “Pickle Rick”: to /r/rickandmorty (shown below, left). On October 17th, Redditror Extremexis submitted a deep fried variation of the image captioned with the phrase “Begone Thot”, which gathered more than 2,300 points and 45 comments within 24 hours on /r/dankmemes (shown below).



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Reddit – Honesty

    [2]Reddit – Deep fried meme

    [3]Facebook – UnexpectedMemes

    [4]Twitter – @9gag


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  • 10/17/17--11:34: You Can Help By Expanding It
  • About

    You Can Help By Expanding It refers to a line often found in Wikipedia encouraging new users to add to the entry. Online, people have found violent or offensive articles and super-imposed the “you can help by expanding it” above a smiling character. The “expanding” thus means to continue the acts detailed on the page, rather than adding to the information.

    Origin

    The earliest available instance of this meme as an image macro appeared on MemeCenter in 2015. MemeCenter[1] user sremil2011 posted a screenshot of the Wikipedia entry for “List of terrorist incidents in Great Britain” above the line “This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it” and a middle eastern man smiling, joking on Islamophobic stereotypes about terrorism and Islam. The post (shown below) received more than 640 likes in two years.



    Precursor

    Before becoming an image macro, the line was often featured in Screenshots of Despair. Much like the macro, images of the line were taken literally for comedic purposes.



    Spread

    Over the next few years, people online began placing next to images of characters, such as Batman and "Bolbi Stroganovsky":memes/bolbi-stroganovsky, to express exaggerated excitement. On April 2nd, 2017, Instagram[2] user @sp00py_is_my_middle_name posted an image of the line from the “List of school massacres” Wikipedia between pictures of Batman frowning and then smiling (shown below, left). Two weeks later, on April 20th, Facebook[3] user CrusaderDante posted one with Stroganovsky (shown below, right). Two days later, Redditor[4] posted the meme on the /r/dankmemes subreddit, garnering more than 3,500 points (91% upvoted) and 60 comments in five months.



    On July 31st, Facebook[6] user comemenism posted the line and the entry for “Victims of Communism” super-imposed over a picture of Joseph Stalin. The post (shown below) received more than 1,000 reactions, 180 shares and 80 comments in three months.



    Various Examples




    Search History

    External References


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  • 10/17/17--12:12: KRACK
  • About

    KRACK is an acronym for Key Reinstallation Attack, a type of cyber attack that exploits vulnerabilities in Wi-Fi Protected Access protocol to compromise Wi-Fi-connected devices.

    Origin

    On October 16th, 2017, the website KrackAttack.com[1] was launched, which highlighted a WPA2 protocol Wi-Fi vulnerability affecting nearly all Wi-Fi connected devices.

    When a client joins a network, it executes the 4-way handshake to negotiate a fresh encryption key. It will install this key after receiving message 3 of the 4-way handshake. Once the key is installed, it will be used to encrypt normal data frames using an encryption protocol. However, because messages may be lost or dropped, the Access Point (AP) will retransmit message 3 if it did not receive an appropriate response as acknowledgment. As a result, the client may receive message 3 multiple times. Each time it receives this message, it will reinstall the same encryption key, and thereby reset the incremental transmit packet number (nonce) and receive replay counter used by the encryption protocol. We show that an attacker can force these nonce resets by collecting and replaying retransmissions of message 3 of the 4-way handshake. By forcing nonce reuse in this manner, the encryption protocol can be attacked, e.g., packets can be replayed, decrypted, and/or forged

    The same day, security expert Mathy Vanhoef uploaded a video showing a demonstration of the attack to YouTube (shown below).



    Spread

    That day, the /r/KRaCK[2] subreddit was launched for discussions about the Wi-Fi vulnerability. Meanwhile, several threads about the exploit reached the front page of /r/OutOfTheLoop, /r/apple, /r/linux and /r/technology subreddits.

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/17/17--14:40: Click dealer
  • you got any clicks?


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  • 10/17/17--15:07: Bing Bing Wahoo
  • About

    Bing Bing Wahoo is a phonetic spelling of the noises made by Mario in Super Mario games, notably Super Mario 64, when he collects coins and jumps. The phrase grew popular on the 4chan board /v/ in 2016, coinciding with announcement of the Nintendo Switch and Super Mario Odyssey, and has been used as an insult for Nintendo fans.

    Origin

    On October 6th, 2016, an anonymous user in a /v/ thread posted the phrase[1] with a picture of Paper Mario (shown below).



    Spread

    Two weeks later,[2] after the Nintendo Switch’s first commercial was released, an image of a man playing the Switch on an airplane became the subject of a running gag in the community, imagining the man upsetting nearby passengers by playing a Mario game on the Switch.



    This was the origin of a characterization of Nintendo fans as immature and irritating, exemplified by the noises made in a typical Mario platformer. One of the most popular plays on the joke, posted to Twitter on October 30th, 2016,[3] took an image of a person playing a Switch at a party with annoyed looking onlookers (shown below).



    A play on the same joke would be posted again on March 1st, 2017 to /v/ (shown below). A screenshot of this joke was later posted to Facebook meme page Carl Wheezer: Meme Dealer.[4]



    Eventually, the phrase “Bing Bing Wahoo” would turn into slang for Mario and the Switch itself, particularly as the release date for Super Mario Odyssey neared (examples shown below).



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/17/17--15:47: Im Fine With This
  • Im fine with this – Gabriel


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  • 10/18/17--01:35: Garok
  • Garok or The original name Garok Anggara Pratama is a man from Indonesia famous for his videos that had viral on facebook, in the video, scratch pronounce harsh words such as D*ick, P*ssy, B*tch, and others in public, there are people who make it as a meme material, there are also less like him. there are also people who call it “The most autistic people in Indonesia” because of his behavior, although it is famous and had in humiliation many people, garok still do his autism life on facebook


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  • 10/16/17--08:59: First of All
  • About

    First of All refers to a series of dialogue tweets in which a tweeter imagines person saying something, to which the person responds “first of all…” with a humorous rebuttal. The texts are predominantly popular on Black Twitter.

    Origin

    The meme began spreading in the first half of October 2017. On October 1st, 2017, Twitter user unbotheredbliss[1] tweeted ““Why you ain’t text me back” First of all experiment 623 you’re not my man, relax.” The tweet went viral, gaining over 45,000 retweets and 121,000 likes (shown below).



    Spread

    Over the course of the following two weeks, the dialogue would be reproduced with various other humorous scenarios. On October 6th, user @tep126[2] tweeted “Niggas say “Go have fun with that other nigga” like it’s a threat liiiiike first of all, ima have a blast,” gaining over 23,000 retweets and 51,000 likes (shown below, left). On October 8th, user @oluuuuuuchi[3] tweeted ““hey shorty” , first of all I’m taller than you .” and gained over 950 retweets (shown below, right).



    By October 15th, the meme had begun attracting media attention. It has been covered by Twitter Moments,[4] Smosh,[5] Complex,[6] and more.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References


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