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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 08/17/17--18:50: LGTM
  • LGTM (“Looks Good To Me”) is a positive response to a request for approval, particularly code reviews for software. It’s associated with GitHub, being the most common short comment on there, though it actually dates back to the era when open source projects primarily used mailing lists to submit code. It is also commonly used in other informal situations where suggestions are being signed off on.

    Origin

    The true origin is hard to trace, though the first use of the LGTM stamp is in 2008.

    The Rubber Stamp

    The earliest memetic (as opposed to just being a cliche) use of LGTM is the Rubber Stamp, designed to contrast the official-ness of the stamp with the unofficial sound of the phrase “looks good to me.” It also reflects the idea that the reviewer looked at the code but hasn’t attempted to test or prove it correct, essentially meaning that they’ve “rubber stamped” it. Since 2012, they can be bought online.

    Reaction Images and GIFs

    The lgtm.in website was created in July 2013, according to the Wayback Machine. Since they work so much better in websites than mailing lists, the introduction of LGTM reaction gifs probably matches up with the migration from mailing lists to web-based code review tools like GitHub’s “Pull Request V2” system (the old version of pull requests didn’t support conversations).

    Google Trends


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  • 08/18/17--06:54: Self-Aware Robot
  • About

    Self-Aware Robot refers to an exploitablewebcomic by Sam Pratt of RustledJimmies.net in which a scientist announces a robot has gained self-awareness. The robot then says something outrageous, and the scientist hurriedly says “It’s not finished yet.”

    Origin

    On August 17th, 2017, RustledJimmies.net[1] posted the comic to their website. In the original, the robot says The Earth is Flat. The post (shown below) has over 2,800 notes as of August 18th.



    Spread

    On August 18th, Redditor Nibbink[2] posted the comic to /r/comics, where it gained over 19,000 points. It had been posted to /r/MemeEconomy[4] the day before, but the post only gained 52 points. When it was reposted to /r/MemeEconomy two hours after the /r/comics post, it gained over 5,000 points.[3] In the r/comics comments section, Redditor ShaneH7646[3] made a template for the exploitable (shown below).



    Meanwhile, several popular posts with the format appeared on /r/dankmemes. As of August 18th, the most popular post on the subreddit makes a “Mods are Gay” joke, a typical joke of the subreddit, gaining over 560 points (shown below, left). Other popular jokes in the subreddit, such as Traps are Gay, made up the majority of early popular edits (example shown below, right).



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References

    [1]RustledJimmies.net

    [2]Reddit – /r/comics

    [3]Reddit – "https://www.reddit.com/r/comics/comments/6uh5xy/selfaware_robot/dlsrjwl/

    [4]Reddit – /r/MemeEconomy


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  • 08/18/17--07:34: Tim Allen's Evolution Tweet
  • About

    Tim Allen’s Evolution Tweet refers to a series of parody tweets mocking a post by comedian and actor Tim Allen, questioning the fundamental tenants of evolutionary science.

    Origin

    On August 16th, 2017, comedian and actor Tim Allen tweeted[1]“If we evolved from apes why are there still apes.” The tweet (shown below) received more than 14,500 retweets and 48,600 likes in less than 48 hours.



    Spread

    Shortly after Allen posted his tweet, Twitter[2] user @michaelaranger answered question. In a series of tweets, he said:

    “Us & today’s “apes” evolved from a common ancestor, different from both of us. Technically we split once, came together again & split again. That last common ancestor looked & acted more like what we think of as ape than us, but it wasn’t an ape of today.Why are we balder/smarter? In short, evolution is driven by environment & death. Our ancestor’s environments caused the weaker ones to die & stronger to propagate. If a species’ environment is less difficult, it might change less- less “fit” traits don’t die out as quick. Among other reasons, this is why species with a common ancestor can diverge from that ancestor at different rates. Also, humans are considered apes too👍."

    The tweets (shown below) received more than 275 retweets and 4,500 likes.



    People on Twitter also joked that Tim Allen could ask Wilson, his fictional neighbor from the television series Home Improvement that his character Tim Taylor would ask questions about the universe. That day, Twitter[3] user @sirmitchel, tweeted “You are so fucking lost without Wilson.” The tweet (shown below) received more than 420 retweets and 5,000 likes.



    Additionally, people started parodying Allen’s tweet by using the same structure as the comedian’s tweet. They would ask If x is true, why is “Y” true too?. These were the prevailing joke used in defining the meme.

    That day, Twitter[4] published a Moments page to archive the response to Allen’s tweet. Additionally, several media outlets covered the response to the tweet, including Inverse,[5] Maxim,[6] AV Club[7] and more.


    On August 17th, Redditor[8] Not-Patrick posted a picture of Allen’s tweet with a stock photo of a man smashing his hands on the ground with a black and white picture of the founder of evolutionary science Charles Darwin photoshopped over the man’s face. The picture was captioned “Dammit! What a fool I was.” The post (shown below) received more than 2,100 points (97% upvoted) and 35 comments.



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 08/18/17--08:13: 2017 Barcelona Attacks
  • Overview

    The 2017 Barcelona Attacks refer to a series of terror attacks that occurred in late August 2017 when 16 people were killed and upwards of 100 were injured.

    Background

    On August 16th, 2017, an explosion occurred at a house in Alcanar, Spain, killing one woman and injured six other people. The following day, a white Fiat Talento van crashed into a large group of pedestrians on La Rambla street in Barcelona. Following the attack, a suspect stabbed a civilian to death while fleeing the scene with another suspect. On August 18th, an Audi A3 car drove into a crowd of pedestrians in Cambrils, killing one civilian and injuring six others. Police subsequently shot and killed five suspected terrorists who exited the vehicle.

    Developments

    ISIS Response

    Following the vehicle attack in Barcelona, ISIS claimed responsibility claimed responsibility via the Amaq News Agency.[1]

    Suspects

    Police detained four people in connection with the attack in Cambrils and announced they believed the incident was related to both the Barcelona car attack and the explosion in Alcanar.[1]

    Online Reactions

    On August 17th, posts about the Barcelona attack reached the front page of the /r/worldnews[2] and /r/news[3] subreddits.

    Donald Trump’s Response

    On August 17th, United States president Donald Trump posted a tweet condemning the attack (shown below).[5]



    Shortly after, Trump encouraged Twitter followers to “study what General Pershing of the United States did to terrorists when caught”, claiming “there was no more Radical Islamic Terror for 35 years!” (shown below).[6]



    That day, The Washington Post[4] reported that Trump was referred to rumors that Pershing had dipped bullets in pigs’ blood used to execute jihadists in the Philipines, noting that several fact-checkers had determined the rumors were unsubstantiated.

    Search Interest

    External References


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    Overview

    Confederate Statue Removals Controversy refers to the debate surrounding the removal of statues honoring the Confederate States of America, the group of states which seceded from the United States of America in the 1860s, leading to the American Civil War. After the violence that resulted from the 2017 Unite the Rally, an event originally started as a protest of the removal of a statue of confederate general Robert E. Lee, a debate raged in cities across the United States as well as online of what Confederate statues represented. Many statues were removed by cities and one was notably removed by a group of protestors. Comments from President Donald Trump and conservative activists sparked memes regarding the debate on whether Confederate Statues were pieces of history or symbols of white nationalism.

    Background

    The 2017 Unite the Right Rally, held in Charlottesville, Virginia the evening of August 11th, 2017 and into August 12th, began as a protest of the removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. The protest turned violent as the protestors and leftist counter-protestors represented by groups such as Antifa and Democratic Socialists of America clashed, notably resulting in the death of leftist counter-protestor Heather Heyer after a driver drove a car into a mass of counter-protestors.

    Developments

    Trump Comments

    In the span of three days, President Trump first condemned the violence “on both sides.” He then said the following day, “Racism is evil. And those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the K.K.K., neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans.” The following day, Trump doubled down on his first comments stressing the so-called alt-left was just as much to blame for the violence in Charlottesville as the white supremacists.



    Durham Statue Toppling

    On August 14th, 2017, two days after the 2017 Unite the Right Rally, leftist protestors in Durham, North Carolina tore down a statue outside of the old Durham County Courthouse honoring “the boys who wore the gray,” referring to the uniform of the confederate army. The statue had stood since 1924, 60 years after the Civil War, and was erected by the United Daughters of the Confederacy. The statue fell to the ground and crumpled (video shown below).



    While some online echoed the appall of some conservatives, the majority of popular online reactions celebrated the protestors. Several popular tweets used the image of the crumpled statue as a reaction image, while others parodied conservative responses to the event by posting different statues, defending them as “conservative monuments” (examples shown below). These jokes were covered by The Fader.



    Other Confederate Statue Removals

    Following the Rally, dozens more Confederate statues were removed across the United States. As of August 18th, 2017, statues in Baltimore, Brooklyn, Gainesville, and New Orleans have been removed, and proposals to remove statues in several other cities exist.[1]

    Online Reactions

    Before the Liberals Find a Reason to Deface This Statue

    On August 14th, 2017, actor James Woods tweeted a picture of the United States Marine Corps War Memorial, also known as the “Iwo Jima Memorial,” with the caption “Before the #liberals find a reason to deface, destroy or degrade this one, I thought some of you might like to see it one more time…” (shown below). The tweet gained over 13,000 retweets and 28,000 likes.



    Several hours after Woods’ tweet, dozens of Twitter users began to parody it by posting pictures of humorous and less iconic statues using his caption. One of the first notable examples was posted by @leftisbestwing, who used an image of a statue of the Jolly Green Giant, gaining over 150 retweets and 950 likes (shown below, left). One of the most popular examples was tweeted by @spookperson, who used the caption with an image of an inflatable buttplug, gaining over 820 retweets and 3,700 likes (shown below, right).



    Trump “Beautiful Statues” Tweet

    On August 17th, 2017, Trump delivered a series of tweets claiming that the statues represented America’s history, and that while one can’t change history, they can learn from it (shown below).



    Trump’s tweets inspired a series of jokes similar to “Before The Liberals Find a Reason to Deface This Statue,” in which people posted pictures of humorous statues claiming they were a beautiful part of the nation’s history. These jokes were covered by Twitter Moments[2] and August 18th.



    History: Statue Equivocation

    Another debate surrounding the removal of the statues centered on the position that removing the statues was tantamount to forgetting history. This position was met with doubt from left-leaning skeptics, who noted that statues were hardly the only thing that preserved history. A series of tweets by @LibShipwreck pointed out the fallacy, which were also covered by Twitter Moments[3] on the 18th.



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 08/22/17--00:41: Best. Team. Building. Ever!!
  • One of 10 team building memes available at http://esculturaeventos.es/en/posts/10-team-building-memes/. Hope you like!


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  • 08/17/17--12:02: Tucker's Thoughts
  • About

    Tucker’s Thoughts refers to a series of exploitables based on a segment of the news commentary TV series Tucker Carlson Tonight. In the segment, host Tucker Carlson attempts to explain the commonality of slavery in the world prior to the Civil War by using four digital panels to help highlight his main points. People online then photoshopped different words on the panels to mock and parody the segment.

    Origin

    On August 15th, 2017, Tucker Carlson devoted the first part of his series Tucker Carlson Tonight on the Fox News network discussing the Durham Statue Toppling, in which a group of activists forcibly removed a number of statues commemorating Confederate soldiers and generals.[1] During the segment, Carlson argues that the slavery was common during the time of the Civil War, using a series of digital panels (video below) to highlight his main points, which read “Slavery is evil,” “Until 150 Years Ago, Slavery Was Rule,” “Plato, Mohammed, Aztecs All Owned Slaves,” and Slaveholding Common Among North American Indians."



    Spread

    During the broadcast, Twitter [2] user @benjacobs tweeted a picture of a television with Tucker and the four panels on the screen with the caption “Fox News just now.” The post (shown below) received more than 4,100 retweets and 6,800 likes in 48 hours.



    Shortly after the picture appeared online, Twitter[3] user @McJesse tweeted a screen cap from the segment with the words on the panels missing, creating a template for the meme. He captioned the tweet “Twitter…have at it.” The tweet (shown below) received) more than 950 retweets and 3,600 likes.



    People began replying to the tweet with photoshopped versions of the screenshot. Essentially, they would replace the original text with absurd or politically satirical jokes about Tucker, U.S. President Donald Trump or the current state of race relations in the United States (examples below).



    Various Examples




    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]YouTube – Tucker: If we erase the past, prepare for the consequences

    [2]Twitter – @benjacobs’ Tweet

    [3]Twitter – @McJesse’s Tweet


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  • 08/17/17--13:14: Jeb Wins
  • About

    Jeb Wins refers to an exploitableelectoral college map parody featuring Jeb Bush celebrating in front of an electoral college map where he has won all 538 electoral college votes. After the original image spread before the 2016 United States Presidential Election, its concept has been used as a meme in various other elections across the globe and has been turned into an exploitable in which Bush is replaced with various other characters.

    Origin

    On September 11th, 2016, an anonymous 4chan user posted the image to /pol/. [8] On September 14th, 2016, a user on /r/The_Donald submitted the edit, gaining 68 points.[1] The user has since deleted their account (shown below).



    Spread

    The image became more popular as the November 8th presidential election approached, and again immediately after the election. On the night of the election, Redditor SyntheticStupidity[2] posted the picture to /r/dankmemes, gaining over 23,000 points. On the 9th, Xanthous_King[3] uploaded the image to /r/teenagers, gaining over 3,800 points. The image’s popularity led to spinoffs used for various other elections around the globe. For example, during the 2017 UK Election, a Jeb edit featuring a map of the United Kingdom was posted to /r/The_Donald on April 21st, 2017,[4] gaining over 2,900 points (shown below, left). On May 8th,[5] in reference to the 2017 French Presidential Election, an edit featuring a map of France featuring Jeb was also posted to the subreddit. These were also first posted to /pol/,[9][10] where the meme had taken the name “Jeb Surge.”



    The original image has also turned into an exploitable in which Jeb is replaced with various other characters. For example, on the night of the United States presidential election, Redditor SincerelySpiffy[7] published an edit to /r/dankmemes in which Jeb was replaced with Waluigi, gaining over 430 points (shown below, left). Another popular edit referenced the popularity of Sonic Mania and was published by Tumblr user thequebecninja[6] on August 15th, 2017, gaining over 1,800 points (shown below, right).



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 08/17/17--18:50: LGTM
  • LGTM (“Looks Good To Me”) is a positive response to a request for approval, particularly code reviews for software. It’s associated with GitHub, being the most common short comment on there, though it actually dates back to the era when open source projects primarily used mailing lists to submit code. It is also commonly used in other informal situations where suggestions are being signed off on.

    Origin

    The true origin is hard to trace, though the first use of the LGTM stamp is in 2008.

    The Rubber Stamp

    The earliest memetic (as opposed to just being a cliche) use of LGTM is the Rubber Stamp, designed to contrast the official-ness of the stamp with the unofficial sound of the phrase “looks good to me.” It also reflects the idea that the reviewer looked at the code but hasn’t attempted to test or prove it correct, essentially meaning that they’ve “rubber stamped” it. Since 2012, they can be bought online.

    Reaction Images and GIFs

    The lgtm.in website was created in July 2013, according to the Wayback Machine. Since they work so much better in websites than mailing lists, the introduction of LGTM reaction gifs probably matches up with the migration from mailing lists to web-based code review tools like GitHub’s “Pull Request V2” system (the old version of pull requests didn’t support conversations).

    Google Trends


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  • 08/18/17--06:54: Self-Aware Robot
  • About

    Self-Aware Robot refers to an exploitablewebcomic by Sam Pratt of RustledJimmies.net in which a scientist announces a robot has gained self-awareness. The robot then says something outrageous, and the scientist hurriedly says “It’s not finished yet.”

    Origin

    On August 17th, 2017, RustledJimmies.net[1] posted the comic to their website. In the original, the robot says The Earth is Flat. The post (shown below) has over 2,800 notes as of August 18th.



    Spread

    On August 18th, Redditor Nibbink[2] posted the comic to /r/comics, where it gained over 19,000 points. It had been posted to /r/MemeEconomy[4] the day before, but the post only gained 52 points. When it was reposted to /r/MemeEconomy two hours after the /r/comics post, it gained over 5,000 points.[3] In the r/comics comments section, Redditor ShaneH7646[3] made a template for the exploitable (shown below).



    Meanwhile, several popular posts with the format appeared on /r/dankmemes. As of August 18th, the most popular post on the subreddit makes a “Mods are Gay” joke, a typical joke of the subreddit, gaining over 560 points (shown below, left). Other popular jokes in the subreddit, such as Traps are Gay, made up the majority of early popular edits (example shown below, right).



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References

    [1]RustledJimmies.net

    [2]Reddit – /r/comics

    [3]Reddit – "https://www.reddit.com/r/comics/comments/6uh5xy/selfaware_robot/dlsrjwl/

    [4]Reddit – /r/MemeEconomy


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  • 08/22/17--04:29: Waitress
  • Hot waitress drink order.


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  • 08/17/17--12:02: Tucker's Thoughts
  • About

    Tucker’s Thoughts refers to a series of exploitables based on a segment of the news commentary TV series Tucker Carlson Tonight. In the segment, host Tucker Carlson attempts to explain the commonality of slavery in the world prior to the Civil War by using four digital panels to help highlight his main points. People online then photoshopped different words on the panels to mock and parody the segment.

    Origin

    On August 15th, 2017, Tucker Carlson devoted the first part of his series Tucker Carlson Tonight on the Fox News network discussing the Durham Statue Toppling, in which a group of activists forcibly removed a number of statues commemorating Confederate soldiers and generals.[1] During the segment, Carlson argues that the slavery was common during the time of the Civil War, using a series of digital panels (video below) to highlight his main points, which read “Slavery is evil,” “Until 150 Years Ago, Slavery Was Rule,” “Plato, Mohammed, Aztecs All Owned Slaves,” and Slaveholding Common Among North American Indians."



    Spread

    During the broadcast, Twitter [2] user @benjacobs tweeted a picture of a television with Tucker and the four panels on the screen with the caption “Fox News just now.” The post (shown below) received more than 4,100 retweets and 6,800 likes in 48 hours.



    Shortly after the picture appeared online, Twitter[3] user @McJesse tweeted a screen cap from the segment with the words on the panels missing, creating a template for the meme. He captioned the tweet “Twitter…have at it.” The tweet (shown below) received) more than 950 retweets and 3,600 likes.



    People began replying to the tweet with photoshopped versions of the screenshot. Essentially, they would replace the original text with absurd or politically satirical jokes about Tucker, U.S. President Donald Trump or the current state of race relations in the United States (examples below).



    Various Examples




    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]YouTube – Tucker: If we erase the past, prepare for the consequences

    [2]Twitter – @benjacobs’ Tweet

    [3]Twitter – @McJesse’s Tweet


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    About

    “I’m a Man / Woman Looking For” refers to an exploitable questionnaire used on Twitter in which people specify their gender and a humorous response to what they look for in a romantic partner, parodying the format of a dating survey. The template follows the structure of a personal ad: “I am a ⚪️ man or ⚪️ woman”/ “Looking for ⚪️ Man ⚪️ Woman ⚪️ [Joke Response].” The user uses the “🔘” emoji to point to do the joke.

    Origin

    On August 14th, 2017, Twitter[1] user @SPENCERcNIEMETZ tweeted the first questionnaire, posting that he is a “man” looking for “Carly Rae Jepsen’s 2015 masterpiece E•MO•TION to receive the justice it deserves.” The tweet (shown below) received more than 8,500 retweets and 30,000 likes in eight days.



    Spread

    Shortly after the first tweet, others began using the format. Twitter users also began changing the format to reference the Star Wars prequels (below, left), comic book superhero Spider-Man (below, center) and popular song lyrics (below, right), amassing thousands of likes and retweets.



    On August 20th, jazz musician and saxophonist Kenny G tweeted[2] a variation in which he claimed to be a “🔘 G” looking for “🔘 Serious Sax.” The tweet (shown below) received more than 33,000 retweets and 95,000 likes.



    The following day, New York magazine[3] posted an article about the meme to highlight some of the history and popularity of the format. Additionally, that day, the meme appeared on the subreddit/r/MemeEconomy. The post received more than 200 points (97% upvoted).

    Various Examples




    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    Donald Trump Staring at the Eclipse refers to images of United States President Donald Trump squinting his eyes while look at the 2017 solar eclipse. Online, many mocked the president for failing to heed warnings about the dangers of staring directly at the sun.

    Origin

    On August 21st, 2017, Twitter user @leyawn[1] tweeted a pair of fake New York Times headlines reporting that Trump had “suffered permanent eye damage” after staring at the solar eclipse (shown below). Within 24 hours, the tweet received upwards of 23,500 likes and 7,800 retweets.



    Later that day, Trump was filmed observing a solar eclipse with his wife Melania and his son Barron. After briefly looking at the sun while wearing protective glasses, Trump removed them and squinted while staring at the sky (shown below).



    Spread

    Shortly after the First Family’s appearance, Twitter user @axios[4] tweeted a screen-captured image of Trump looking upwards at the eclipse without glasses, along with the message “And he goes for it” (shown below, left). Meanwhile, Wall Street Journal reported Ted Mann posted a photo of Trump looking upwards at the sky along with a tweet claiming a person in the crowd yelled “Don’t look” at the same moment (shown below, right).[2]



    Also on August 21, 2017, comedian Paul F. Tompkins posted a short video clip of Trump looking at the sun along with the message “Hey, our President may have irreparably damaged his retinas?” (shown below).




    On August 22nd, the New York Daily News printed a newspaper cover featuring Trump squinting at the sky with the headline “Not Too Bright!”



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 08/22/17--09:58: Man Looking at Other Woman
  • About

    Man Looking at Other Woman is a captioned stock photo series in which a man looks at the backside of a woman walking by while another woman, presumably his romantic partner, looks on disapprovingly.

    Origin

    [Researching]

    Spread

    On August 19th, 2017, Twitter user @n1m161 posted the stock depicting the man staring longingly at “socialism” while “capitalism” looks on.



    On August 21st, Redditor danikger submitted a captioned version of the photo in which the man looks back at the “2017 solar eclipse”: while being stared at by “scientific evidence supporting the dangers of staring at the sun” (shown below). Within 24 hours, the post gained over 31,200 points (93% upvoted) and 130 comments on /r/me_irl.[3]



    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References

    [1]

    [2]

    [3]Reddit – me irl


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  • 08/22/17--11:36: Country Girls Make Do
  • About

    Country Girls Make Do is a catchphrase based on an a sexual illustration that implies a woman masturbated using an ear of corn. The picture is often coupled with the caption “City women buy vibrators/country women make do.” While the image itself has been used on numerous social media platforms, the phrase has mostly been associated with Tumblr.

    Origin

    On August 19th, 2014, the Facebook[1] account for German artist and illustrator Toni Greis posted the original image of a woman walking away from a dripping ear of corn, implying that she used it for masturbation. The image (shown below) received more than 860 reactions, 180 shares and 45 comments in three years.



    Spread

    On August 3rd, 2017, Facebook[2] user MoreMindlessBullshit posted the earliest known version of the picture with the caption “City girls buy vibrators/Country girls make do.”

    Several days later, on August 7th, Redditor[3] TeBeroDerp posted the image to the /r/gatekeeping subreddit. The post received more than 2,300 points (92% upvoted) and 230 comments.



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 08/22/17--18:48: Boarposting / Bobby B
  • wip

    About

    Boarposting / Bobby B. refers to various postings, most notably on 4chan’s /tv/ board, centered around the character Robert Baratheon from George R.R. Martin’s book series A Song of Ice and Fire as he appears in HBO’s adaptation, Game of the Thrones, usually featuring glowing eyes in the same style of I am Growing Stronger and/or motion blur effects. The posts frequently make use of the words “whore” and “boar” as they relate to Baratheon’s character, specifically his liberal use of the word “whore” and the fact that he was mortally wounded by a boar while hunting, however these two words are often intentionally replaced with each other for humor’s sake. Another notable aspect is the somewhat frequent use of Lancell Lannister during his time as a squire for Baratheon. The origin and use of the meme on 4chan’s /tv/ board as well as the “-posting” suffix alikens it to related memes such as Baneposting and Sheevposting.

    Origin

    Spread


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  • 08/23/17--09:14: Right Proper Lad
  • About

    Right Proper Lad refers to a catchphrase from a comical image-based recap of the fantasy television series Game of Thrones episode “The Queen’s Justice.” The line has since become a catchphrase among Game of Thrones fan communities.

    Origin

    On July 30th, 2017, the third episode of season seven of Game of Thrones aired on HBO.[1] In the episode, two characters, Jon Snow and Daenerys Targaryen, share a contentious meeting about who will rule the kingdom and how to deal with the ongoing issue of the walking, frozen dead (video below).



    The following day, on July blogger and TV reviewer Chrys of ChrysReivews.com uploaded a series of image macros, humorously recapping the meeting between Jon and Daenerys, to her website.[2] In the review, there is a screencap of the scene that features the character Davos referring to Jon as a “Right proper lad,” and Jon echoes, “Right proper” (shown below).



    Spread

    That day, Chrys posted the series to the /r/GameOfThrones subreddit] where it received more than 17,100 points (94% upvoted) and 980 comments. When posted to Imgur on August 8th, the post received more than 400,000 views and 7,100 points.

    On August 2nd, the following day, Redditor[4] AbelHagen posted a Game of Throneswebcomic by Abel of Wooden Plank Comics based on the scene. In the second panel of the comic (shown below), the character Davos refers to Jon as a “right proper lad.” When posted to /r/GameOfThrones, the post received more than 7,800 points (96% upvoted) and 225 comics.



    Since the initial post, “right proper lad” has become a catchphrase and "copypasta":knowyourmeme.com/memes/copypasta on Reddit. Generally, people will refer to characters that they like as a “right proper lad” or “right proper [noun]” (examples below).



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 08/23/17--09:24: Bear Trap
  • About

    Punching a Bear Trap is an image macro series featuring screen captured images taken from a video in which a man punches a bear trap and pulls his hand out fast enough to avoid being injured. Online, the images are often captioned with humorous scenarios involving narrowly avoiding various catastrophes.

    Origin

    On January 30th, 2015, YouTuber BrandosonR uploaded a video titled “Man punches a bear trap! Amazing!”, featuring footage of an elderly man quickly punching a bear trap and removing his hand before it snaps shut (shown below). Within three years, the video gained over 666,000 views and 99 comments.



    Spread

    On August 19th, 2017, Redditor robertwalling submitted a captioned version of the image in which a woman says “I like memes” before saying “like the dancing hot dog” to /r/dankmemes[1] (shown below). Within 72 hours, the post gained over 2,7800 points (96% upvoted). The following day, Redditor Sumojoe118 posted a variation joking about avoiding a woman who wants to have sex before marriage to /r/dankmemes[2] (shown below, right).



    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References

    [1]Reddit -
    /r/dankmemes

    [2]Reddit – /r/dankmemes

    [3]


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