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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 07/12/17--11:48: That Game Made Me Cum
  • About

    That Game Made Me Cum refers to parodies of online advertisements on pornographic websites which promote pornographic video games by promising the player they will orgasm an extraordinary amount of times in a small amount of time.

    Origin

    Vice[1] traces the origin of online porn games to the 80s with MS-DOS games. They have remained a subsection of the pornography industry for some time. Advertisements for these sorts of games appear to have begun to appear in the mid-2010s on pornographic websites. The advertisements typically promised the player would orgasm multiple times in a short amount of time. On October 7th, 2015, Twitter user @FuckYoTimeline[5] posted a GIF of a pornographic ad they found on a website with the caption “Ads on porn websites are hilarious” (shown below).



    On October 10th, 2015, a Redditor referenced the trope in a thread on Game of War.[4] The earliest traceable parody of the advertisement appears to have been posted on May 2nd, 2016 on Instagram account uber.dude.png.[2]



    Spread

    Around the same time, a video titled “This game made me cum twice in 5 minutes!” in which a person is playing a first person shooter was uploaded to multiple pornographic websites. Over the coming year, people began pairing the text of pornographic game ads with various pictures for humorous effect. On August 19th, 2016, a template to make the parodies was posted to ShitpostBot5000. [3] Since then, a popular subject for the parodies is music vlogger and meme reviewer Anthony Fantano, and several have appeared on Facebook page “Shitposty Botano”[6] (examples shown below).



    Various similar templates have been used to make similar jokes, pairing either a bizarre image or comical game choice with the advertising text. Other popular text choices include “This game will make you cum 32 times in one day,” “That game made me cum 2 times in 5 minutes,” and “This will make you cum in a millisecond.” On May 4th, 2017, gddub posted the formermost to /r/funny[7] with the title “How is this desirable?”, gaining 67 points (cropped version shown below, left). On May 12th, a “cum in a millisecond” post was uploaded to /r/MemeEconomy, where it gained 22 points (shown below, right).



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Vice – Browsing the Twisted World of Online Porn Games

    [2]Instagram – uber.dude.png

    [3]ShitpostBot5000 – Made Me Cum 7 Times

    [4]Reddit – And the award for most misleading ad goes to

    [5]Twitter – @FuckYoTimeline

    [6]Facebook – Shitposty Botano

    [7]/r/Funny – How is this desirable?

    [8]Reddit – ""X’ will make you cum in A millisecond’ memes on the rise!!!":https://www.reddit.com/r/MemeEconomy/comments/6aug97/x_will_make_you_cum_in_a_millisecond_memes_on_the/


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  • 07/12/17--12:39: Kellyanne Conway
  • About

    Kellyanne Conway is the Special Counselor to the United States President Donald Trump and Chief White House Strategist, serving with Steve Bannon. Since coming to the Trump camp during the 2016 presidential election, Conway has become one of the chief speakers on behalf of the president and is known for her forceful pivots mid-conversation.

    History

    Since graduating college, Kellyanne Conway worked as a pollster, first at Luntz Research Companies and then at her own polling outfit, The Polling Company, which she founded in 1995.

    Throughout the 90s, Conways, along with several other conservative women, including Ann Coulter became known on the talkshow circuit for changing how commentators and pundits looked, sounded and dressed.[2] A frequent guest on Politically Incorrect with Bill Maher, Conway and her collegues were occasionally refered to as “pundettes.”[1]

    Political Career

    Kellyanne Conway came into public light during the 2016 presidential election, when publicly endorsed Ted Cruz and chaired a political action committee (PAC) on his behalf. During that time, she made numerous negative comments about then-presidential nominee Donald Trump, speaking out against him on such topics as Trump University and his conservatism. She officially left the Cruz campaign when Cruz suspended the campaign in mid-2016.



    Weeks after the suspension of the Cruz campaign, Conway joined the Trump campaign as a senior advisor. On August 19th, 2016, she was promoted to campaign manager, making her the first woman in U.S. history to successfully run a presidential campaign, having served for 10 weeks.

    Following Trump’s victory, Conway was appointed Senior Counsel to the President and White House Chief Strategist, which she serves with Steve Bannon.

    Alternative Facts

    Two days after the inauguration of President Trump, January 22nd, 2017, Conway appeared on Meet the Press with Chuck Todd to discuss some of the factually incorrect statements made by White House press secretary Sean Spicer, which she referred to as alternative facts.



    That day, the phrase “alternative facts” and the hashtag “#alternativefacts” started trending on Twitter (examples below). The expression quickly became a catchphrase for the administration, specifically when misstating easily provable facts.



    Kellyanne Conway’s ‘Working Hard’ Photo

    Kellyanne Conway’s ‘Working Hard’ Photo refers to a picture of United States President Donald Trump and his campaign manager Kellyanne Conway looking at a Macbook. After the photograph was tweeted by Conway in late November 2016, it widely circulated on Twitter accompanied by various humorous captions and photoshopped computer screens.



    Bowling Green Massacre

    Bowling Green Massacre is a fictional terror attack described by Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway during a televised interview, which was widely mocked on social media in early February 2017.

    On February 2nd, 2017, Conway appeared as a guest on Hardball with Chris Matthews, where she asserted that an attack known as the “Bowling Green Massacre” occurred in 2009 in Bowling Green, Kentucky, leading President Barack Obama to impose a six-month ban on Iraqi refugees (shown below). The interview became the subject of mockery online and at anti-Trump protests.



    Kellyanne Conway’s Microwave Spying Gaffe

    Kellyanne Conway’s Microwave Spying Gaffe refers to a statement made by Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway, in which she claimed microwaves were being used as surveillance cameras during an interview in early March 2017.

    Kellyanne Conway’s Oval Office Couch Photo

    Kellyanne Conway’s Oval Office Couch Photo refers to a photograph of Conway seated on a couch in the oval office on top of her legs. After the photo began circulating online in late February 2017, many expressed outrage toward Conway for placing her feet on the couch.



    Reputation

    Criticisms

    Personal Life

    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    So What’s Wrong With Takin’ The Backstreets is a lyric from All Star by Smash Mouth. In mid-July of 2017, an image from the All Star music video with the lyric beneath it became a reaction image popular on Reddit, and variations blocked out letters of the lyric so that they read something else.

    Origin

    “All Star” was released on May 4th, 1999. In the song, one of the lyrics in the first verse is “So much to do, so much to see, so what’s wrong with takin’ the backstreets?” (shown below.)



    On July 4th, 2017, Instagram user @fvckyoumeme[4] uploaded a screenshot of the lyric to make an anal sex joke in a post that gained over 2,300 likes (shown below).



    Spread

    The meme in which people edited the lyrics began spreading on /r/dankmemes on July 11th, 2017. The subreddit had been editing Now This Looks Like a Job For Me in similar ways in the days prior. On the 11th, TheOriginalEsox[1] uploaded the first edit of the “All Star” video, editing @fvckyoumeme’s post and gaining 32 points (shown below, left). Shortly after, JStoner3[2] uploaded a version that gained over 3,000 points, likely inspiring the creation of other examples (shown below, right).



    The latter post was uploaded to /r/MemeEconomy[3] four hours later, where it gained 224 points. Meanwhile, the format continued trending on /r/dankmemes. Popular posts include a post by tacomaster05[5] that gained 466 points (shown below, left) and a post by tbsgrave[6] that referenced the prior Eminem meme and gained over 1,600 points (shown below, right).



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 07/12/17--18:49: Miyako
  • Miyako the spiciest meme of yukitheater


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  • 07/12/17--19:42: Get Out of YouTube
  • Get Out of YouTube is a 2017 YouTube meme uploaded by Joseph Owens – The Channel because his enemies were raiding his wiki for what he had done in a Skype call back in August 2016.

    Origin

    On April 15, 2017, Joseph Owens – The Channel uploaded a video called "Message to Benjamin Fiedler Teh Meme Collector, VHSFan2004, Imageny, TGM11 and others to tell people to leave YouTube for raiding his wiki for what he did in a Skype call on August 7, 2016, showed his inappropriate parts on Skype.


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  • 07/11/17--06:44: Immortal Snail
  • About

    Immortal Snail also known as the Snail Assassin, refers to a hypothetical scenario in which a person is given millions of dollars and made immortal in exchange for being hunted down by a snail with a fatal touch for the rest of their existence.

    Origin

    On August 26th, 2014, episode #285 of the Rooster Teeth Podcast was released, in which hosts Gus Sorola, Gavin Free, Matt Hullum and Burnie Burns discuss a hypothetical scenario in which a person receives $10 million in exchange for having a snail follow them wherever they go for the rest of their life that will kill them upon being touched (shown below).



    Spread

    On October 1st, 2014, the Rooster Teeth YouTube channel uploaded an animated video using audio from the podcast (shown below). Within three years, the video gained over 2.8 million views and 1,200 comments.



    On December 16th, 2016, Redditor Andy316619 submitted a variation of the scenario to /r/AskReddit,[1] where it gathered upwards of 40,300 points (82% upvoted) and 10,300 comments prior to being archived. In the thread, Redditor XXX69694206969XXX asked “Can’t I just put it in a box?”, to which Andy316619 replied that “it was a decoy snail.”[3] The following day, Redditor GermanSailfish submitted a post titled “I’m betting all my money on this new possible meme: Decoy Snail” to /r/MemeEconomy.[4]



    On March 3rd, 2017, Redditor ass-on-houston-texas submitted a screenshot of a Tinder conversation featuring the Immortal Snail to /r/Tinder[5] (shown below). Within four months, the post received upwards of 1,700 points (96% upvoted) and 170 comments. On July 10th, Redditor Katfish880 submitted a post asking “What’s up with ‘The Immortal Snail’?” to /r/OutOfTheLoop.[2]



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 07/13/17--07:38: Kellyanne Conway Flashcards
  • About

    Kellyanne Conway Flashcards refers to a series of photoshop exploitables based on an image of White House Senior Counsel Kellyanne Conway holding two pieces of white paper to argue for media hysteria over the Russiagate controversy in July 2017.

    Origin

    On July 12th, 2017, Kellyanne Conway appeared on Sean Hannity’s Fox News program to discuss Donald Trump Jr.’s Email controversy. During the interview, she argued that the emails he tweeted, which revealed that he was informed of a Russian government plan to swing the 2016 presidential election in favor of Donald Trump, did not prove collusion with a foreign country. To make her point, she held up two white sheets of paper with the words “conclusion, collusion, illusion, delusion” on them (shown below).[1]



    That night, Twitter user @YasharAli[2] shared the video from Fox News’ twitter account with the caption “This just happened on Hannity…..” The tweet (shown below, left) received more than 3,600 retweets and 7,100 likes. He then responded to his own tweet with “2. Didn’t someone warn Kellyanne not to hold up white pieces of paper? (video in the tweet above)” The second tweet (shown below, right) received more than 400 retweets and 1,600 likes in 12 hours.



    Spread

    Shortly after Fox posted the video, users on Twitter began photoshopping various images onto the flashcards (examples below). Twitter published a Moments page to compile the submissions.[3]



    Several news outlets covered the emerging meme as well as Kellyanne Conway’s use of props, including Newsweek,[4] Fortune,[5] Esquire,[6]USA Today,[7] Elite Daily[8] and more.

    Various Examples




    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    Donald Trump’s “Imaginary” Friend “Jim” refers to a conspiracy theory regarding United States President Donald Trump numerous references to a person named “Jim,” who he regards as a friend, but some believe does not exist.

    Origin

    While President Trump had mentioned Jim on the 2016 campaign trail, Jim became a national news story on February 24th, 2017. During his speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference, President Donald Trump discussed foreign policy and the growing threat of terrorism in Europe (video below). As an example, he delivered an anecdote about his friend “Jim.” He said:[1][2]

    “I have a friend, he’s a very, very substantial guy. He loves the city of lights, he loves Paris. For years, every year during the summer, he would go to Paris, was automatic with his wife and his family. Hadn’t seen him in a while. And I said, Jim, let me ask you a question, how’s Paris doing? “Paris? I don’t go there anymore, Paris is no longer Paris.” That was four years -- four or five years hasn’t gone there. He wouldn’t miss it for anything. Now he doesn’t even think in terms of going there."



    That day, Twitter user @RubenBolling[3] posted a stock photos of an elderly man golfing with the caption “Please, help Donald Trump’s friend ‘Jim,’ who can’t go to Paris anymore. Give generously. #IStandWithThatSubstantialGuyJim.” The tweet (shown below), which received more than 50 retweets and 60 likes, implied to mystery over the existence of “Jim.”



    Spread

    Shortly after the speech, the Mayor Paris posted a picture of herself standing with a pair of costumed performers dressed as Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse. She captioned the post “À Donald et son ami Jim, depuis @LaTourEiffel nous célébrons l’attractivité de #Paris avec Mickey et Minnie” (translation: Donald and his friend Jim, since @LaTourEiffel we celebrate the attractiveness of #Paris with Mickey and Minnie). The post (shown below) received more than 1,400 retweets and 2,300 likes.[4]



    On March 13th, The New Yorker magazine published an article entitled “Who Is Trump’s Friend Jim?” The article breaks down a small investigation on how the magazine attempted to find who this person was, concluding that “Jim the Francophobe was turning out to be the jet-setting counterpart to those vague characters (like Joe the Plumber) with whom politicians have so long stocked their narratives of economic stagnation.”[5]

    Four months later, on July 13th, the Associated Press[6] published a report, which asserted that Jim might not be real, entitled “Trump in Paris: The curious case of his friend Jim.” Several other news outlets covered the Associated Report’s piece on Jim, including The AV Club,[7] HuffPo,[8] Mashable,[9] Telegraph[10] and more. Twitter published a Moments[11] page on the piece, as well.

    The article sparked a resurgence of interest in Jim as people began posting jokes that Jim is Trump’s imaginary friend.



    Later that day, during President Trump’s joint press conference with President of France Emmanuel Macron in Paris, a reporter asked about Jim (shown below). However, Trump did not confirm whether or not Jim was real nor did he make mention of Jim.




    Various Examples




    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 07/13/17--10:00: Kevin Durant
  • About

    Kevin Durant is a star NBABasketball player who currently plays for the Golden State Warriors. He has won numerous awards, including an MVP award and an NBA Finals MVP award, as well as numerous scoring titles.

    History

    Durant was born on September 29th, 1988, in Washington D.C.[1] He played one season of college basketball for Texas University between 2006 and 2007. There, he won numerous awards for his outstanding play. He was then drafted by Seattle Supersonics, who moved to Oklahoma City and were renamed the Thunder after the 2007-2008 season, with the number 2 pick in the 2007 NBA Draft and played with them until he joined the Warriors in 2016. With the Thunder, Durant advanced deep in the playoffs several times, advancing to the NBA Finals in the 2011-2012 season, where the Thunder lost to Lebron James and the Miami Heat.

    Move to Warriors

    Durant attracted criticism when he left the Oklahoma City Thunder to join the Golden State Warriors, who had set the NBA record for wins in a regular season the previous season. On July 4th, 2016, Durant announced his intention to sign with the Warriors in an op-ed for The Player’s Tribune titled “My Next Chapter.”[2] Many thought this gave the Warriors an unfair advantage heading into the 2016-2017 season and compared the move to when Lebron James left the Cleveland Cavaliers to join the Miami Heat, who had proven NBA stars Dwayne Wade and Chris Bosh on the team. The Warriors won the championship in the 2016-2017 season, Durant’s first in his career. After the season, Durant agreed to resign with the Warriors for less money, allowing the team to keep its core players and sign free agents.

    Related Memes

    You Da Real MVP

    On May 6th, 2014, Durant gave an acceptance speech after being given the NBAMVP Award, in which he thanked his teammates, coach, fans, the NBA, and God. At the end of the speech, Durant singled out his mother, thanking her for the sacrifices she made while raising him and referring to her as the “real MVP” (shown below at 25:20). The same day, the G4NBAVideosHD YouTube channel uploaded the speech in its entirety, which gained over 820,000 views and 990 comments in the first three weeks.



    Following the speech, You Da Real MVP became a common colloquialism online. On May 23rd, Redditor jwtj submitted a post asking “What is the MVP meme all about?” to the /r/OutOfTheLoop subreddit, to which several Redditors referenced Durant’s acceptance speech. On May 19th, Redditor EyeGifUp submitted an image macro of Kevin Durant thanking people who allow others to use their Netflix accounts for being “the real MVP” to /r/funny (shown below). In the first nine days, the post gathered more than 18,100 upvotes and 360 comments.



    Kevin Durant Can’t Watch

    Kevin Durant Can’t Watch is a photoshop meme based on a picture of American professional basketball player Kevin Durant sitting on the court and facing the opposite direction as his Oklahoma City Thunder teammate Russel Westbrook threw three foul shots during the final seconds of their NBA Playoff game against the Los Angeles Clippers. On May 13th, 2014, the Oklahoma City Thunder beat the Los Angeles Clippers in an NBA Playoff match with three foul shots by Thunder guard Russell Westbrook during the last minute of the game. As Westbrook took his shots on the free throw line, Thunder’s small forward and star player Kevin Durant sat down on the basketball court and looked the other way.



    In the early hours of the next morning, NBA writer Matt Moore challenged Twitter users to photoshop a picture of Durant seated on the court.



    My Next Chapter

    On July 4th, 2016, after becoming an unrestricted free agent, Kevin Durant announced via an article entitled My Next Chapter[2] in The Players’ Tribune that he was joining the Golden State Warriors after having spent his entire previous career with the Oklahoma City Thunder. The move was criticized by NBA fans, players, and commentators, as the Golden State Warriors were already the best team in the NBA and had just broken the regular season win record the previous year by going 73-9. This lead many to believe Durant signed with the Warriors because they were the easiest team for him to be a part of in order to win a championship. After the 2016-17 regular season began, users on /r/nba began posting photoshopped versions of Kevin Durant’s picture from the “My Next Chapter” article every time the Warriors lost a game, using the logo of the winning team.



    Draymond Green Talking to Kevin Durant

    On April 16th, 2017, the Golden State Warriors basketball team played the Portland Trailblazers in the NBA playoffs. During the game, cameras caught player Draymond Green speaking to teammate Kevin Durant. Several hours after the game, on April 17th, Twitter user @TalkWithTone[2] posted a gif of the talk to Twitter with the caption “Your mum trying to cover you with the blood of Jesus before you leave the house.” The tweet received more than 6,900 retweets and 8,300 likes.






    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Wikipedia – Kevin Durant

    [2]The Player’s Tribune – My Next Chapter


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  • 07/13/17--11:32: Jayden K Smith Facebook Hoax
  • About

    Jayden K Smith Facebook Hoax refers to a viral message spread on Facebook warning against accepting a friend request from Facebook account with the name Jayden K Smith, as Smith is a hacker and accepting the friend request would allow the person and all of their contacts to be hacked. No such account exists and contacts’ information cannot be stolen through a friend request.

    Background

    The hoax which attempts to make someone refuse an invitation from a named stranger to converse online because they’ll implant a computer virus has appeared in various forms for years. Snopes[1] traces an early version of the hoax to an e-mail chain that circulated in the year 2000. The Jayden K Smith version reads:

    “Please tell all the contacts in your Messenger list, not to accept Jayden K. Smith friendship request. He is a hacker and has the system connected to your Facebook account. If one of your contacts accepts it, you will also be hacked, so make sure that all your friends know it. Thanks. Forwarded as received.”

    First mentions of Jayden K. Smith appeared on Twitter on July 5th, 2017,[2] making it the likely date the message began circulating.

    Developments

    After circulating for a few days, it became apparent the message was a hoax. thatsnonsense.com[3] reported it as such on July 7th. Several Twitter users began making jokes about Jayden K Smith shortly thereafter. Popular jokes tied the name to the ongoing Russiagate scandal (examples shown below).



    The hoax was covered by TechCrunch,[4] Huffington Post,[5] The Guardian,[6] and many more.

    Search Interest

    External References


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    Overview

    Day of Action to Save Net Neutrality is a world-wide day of awareness during which companies, thinkers and influencers from all over the internet urged people to write to the Federal Communication Commission regarding the proposed repeal of net neutrality protections.

    Background

    In 2015, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted to reclassify broadband access as a public utility under Title II. The measure helped ensure net neutrality, which prevented ISPs from pursuing paid prioritization agreements for the so-called “fast-lane Internet” and give the governing body more regulatory powers over business activities of the broadband industry in the United States.

    On April 26th, 2017, however, Ajit Pai, whom President Donald Trump named chairman of the FCC in January 2017, announced his plans to repeal the Title II measures.[1]

    Developments

    On June 6th, numerous companies announced their participation in the Day of Action to Save Net Neutrality.[2] Started by the activist group Fight for the Future, the Day of Action would see more than 200 companies joining in support of net neutrality protections.



    On July 12th, 2017, companies around the internet joined the day of action. Such companies as Netflix, Amazon, Google, Facebook, Tumblr, Reddit and more posted banners, asking users to join the fight to save net neutrality.[3][4]



    2017 Meme War to Save Net Neutrality

    On July 12th, 2017, Redditor ZAWGURN posted a notice about the Day of Action in the /r/DankMemes subreddit. The post (shown below), a Drakeposting featuring net neutrality related warnings, received more than 1,500 points (96% upvoted) and 45 comments in 24 hours.[5] On the subreddit, many referred to is as “meme war.”



    That day, on the subreddit /r/MemeEconomy Redditor Pls_no_steal posted that “Save Net Neutrality memes are on the rise” along with another Drakeposting variation (shown below). The post received more than 30,000 points (89% upvoted) and 200 comments in 24 hours.[6]



    Throughout the day, more net neutrality memes flooded /r/DankMemes (examples below), urging people to go to the Battle for the Net website and write the FCC.



    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    “I worked on this story for a year” is a twitter meme where twitter users quote the phrase “I…worked on this story for a year…and…he just…he tweeted it out.” from Jared Yates Sexton’s[1] twitter comment about Donald Trump Jr.’s Email tweet. Twitter users parody Sexton’s tweet by using the phrase as a response to non-serious news-like tweets, images, and ideas.

    Origin

    The meme originates from Jared Yates Sexton’s[1] twitter comment about Donald Trump Jr.’s Email Tweet. Sexton, an independent journalist who claimed to be working on the story, weighed in. On July 11, Sexton wrote about how long he had been working on the story on twitter, he said, “I…worked on this story for a year…and…he just…he tweeted it out.” The tweet[1] (shown below) received more than 39,000 retweets and 125,000 likes in just two days.

    Sexton’s tweet became viral and twitter users immediately started mocking him for working on the story for a year. This quickly evolved when twitter users began quoting his tweet as a response to other tweets, images, and ideas.

    Spread

    The meme has spread throughout twitter with users jokingly quoting Sexton as a response to less serious news related tweets.

    The first known spin off tweet happened on July 11, 2017, from twitter user @amylopan[2] who was the first to use Jared Yates Sexton’s tweet as a response to another tweet. In tweet, @amylopan[2] responds to Larry King’s tweet “The more I eat Honey Nut Cheerios the more like them” by quoting Sexton, tweeting “I…worked on this story for a year….and….he just…he tweeted it out. @amylopan’s[2] tweet reached over 1,000 likes in 2 days.

    On July 12, twitter user @maybetomhanks[3] tweeted his own take on the meme by quoting Sexton in a response Newt Gingrich’s tweet “McDonald’s grilled chicken mcwrap at 250 calories is both a dollar and pound bargain.” The tweet gained over 6,000 retweets and 36,000 likes in just one day.

    Twitter users continue to use the phrase jokingly, using it as a response to a variety of tweets, images, and ideas.

    Various Examples

    Eternal Refrences

    [1]Twitter – @JYSexton tweet

    [2]Twitter – @amylopan tweet

    [3]Twitter – @maybetomhalks tweet


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  • 07/13/17--17:27: Kill Six Billion Demons
  • W.I.P., feel free to help me out.

    About

    Kill Six Billion Demons (abbreviated KSBD) is an ongoing webcomic by artist Abbadon about a young woman, Allison, who gets involved in a millenary conflict for the control of the bizarre world of Throne, ruled by the Seven. The comic has been praised for its detailed artwork, extensive lore and unique worldbuilding.

    Premise

    The story follows a young woman, Allison, who is bestowed with the Key of Kings by a mysterious figure and transported to the bizarre, ancient world of Throne, populated by angels, demons and gods. In addition to rescuing her boyfriend Zaid, Allison must figure out her role in this world and discover if she is the prophesied Successor, who will defeat the Seven, rulers of the Multiverse, and rule Throne. In her adventure, she is accompanied by angel 82 White Chain and Cio.

    History

    KSBD was originally conceived as early as 2004, according to Abbadon, and it was supposed to borrow concepts from shonen manga. The first modern incarnation appeared in 2012 in the MS Paint Adventures forum, where readers could direct Allison on her adventures by posting suggestions. Eventually Abbadon (then going by the nickname orbitaldropkick) abandoned the webcomic for work-related reasons, but in April 2013 he launched _KSBD_’s own website.

    Reception

    KSBD has been acclaimed by numerous sites and reviewers, such as That One Comic Guy, The Beat and Black Gate, among others. It has garnered praise on tumblr, reddit and 4chan, and Image Comics has published the first volume of the story. The wiki can be visited here.

    Fan Art

    Search Interest


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  • 07/14/17--03:41: Nerd on Computer
  • This seemingly old photography depicts a geek-looking overweight young man in front of a computer set from the 70s or 80s, presumably when the picture was taken. Some commented that his face is incongruous with the rest of the body, especially his notably hairy arms.

    The image has been circulating as a meme on the internet since at least 2005. It is used as a stereotype geek or nerd cybercultures. In most usages, the image appears edited with something placed over the monitor; in its original clean version, however, the monitor is turned off.

    The person depicted, the photographer, and the exact date, location and context of the picture are unknown.


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  • 07/14/17--07:19: Beyoncé Twins Photo
  • About

    Beyoncé Twins Photo refers to a stylized photograph of recording artist Beyoncé standing with her newborn twins, Sir Carter and Rumi, in front of a floral archway. Shortly after the release of the photograph, people online began photoshopping and reacting to the image.

    Origin

    On July 14th, 2017, Beyoncé shared a photograph of herself in front a floral arch holding her newborn twins, Sir Carter and Rumi. The photograph was captioned “Sir Carter and Rumi 1 month today. 🙏🏽❤️👨🏽👩🏽👧🏽👶🏾👶🏾.” This post (shown below) received more than 6.5 million likes in nine hours.[1]



    Spread

    The image was met with great excitement online. Shortly after Beyoncé posted the photo, people began sharing and responding to the post with reaction images and gifs of enthusiasm and congratulations.



    In addition, people began photoshopping the image in a similar way to Beyoncé’s infamous pregnancy announcement.



    The photograph and reaction to it received attention from several news outlets, including USA Today,[2] Yahoo,[3] Elite Daily,[4] Mashable,[5] and more. Additionally, Twitter published a Moments page about the birth announcement picture and reaction.[6]

    Various Examples




    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Instagram – @beyonce’s Tweet

    [2]USA Today – #Beyoncetwins: The Internet’s got jokes about the first look at Beyoncé’s babies

    [3]Yahoo – Internet reacts to Beyonce’s first twins pic

    [4]Elite Daily – The Best Twitter Reactions And Memes About Beyoncé’s First Photoshoot With Twins Rumi And Sir

    [5]Mashable – Beyoncé and her babies are being rightly compared to works of timeless art

    [6]Twitter – Beyoncé introduces the newest Carters 😍


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    About

    PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds (PUBG) is a multiplayer online battle royal video game created by developer Bluehole for Microsoft Windows with planned releases for Xbox One and PlayStation 4 systems in the future. To win, players must eliminate all competitors across a deserted island using weapons, equipment and other items discovered throughout the match.

    History

    In March 2017, PUBG was released on Steam Early Access,[2] where it sold upwards of four million copies for Microsoft Windows systems over the next several months. On March 9th, an official trailer for the game was uploaded to the PC Gamer YouTube channel (shown below).



    On May 4th, Bluehole held a Battlegrounds 2017 Charity Invitational during which Twitch streamers competed with one another to raise upwards of $220,000 for the charity Gamers Outreach, which “provides equipment, technology, and software to help kids cope with treatment inside hospitals.”[4]

    Online Presence

    On July 26th, 2016, the /r/Pubattlegrounds[1] subreddit was created for discussions about the game, which received upwards of 162,000 subscribers over the next year. The game is a popular title for various notable Twitch streamers, including PyrionFlax, Sophia White and Ninja.[3]

    On YouTube

    On March 22nd, 2017, YouTuber FrankieOnPC posted a video of one of his first matches in the game, gaining more than 3.2 million views and 4,400 comments over the next four months (shown below, left). On May 12th, YouTuber jacksepticeye released a video of himself playing the game (shown below, right). Over the next two months, the video received over 1.3 million views and 4,400 comments.



    On June 7th, YouTuber SovietWombie posted a montage of humorous moments in the game (shown below, left). Within one week, the video garnered more than 2.8 million views and 5,900 comments. On June 11th, YouTuber PewDiePie uploaded a video of himself playing the game, which gathered upwards of 4.4 million views and 26,500 comments within 72 hours (shown below, right).



    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    I Showed You My Dick Please Respond refers to several images of unattractive boys with a variation of the text “I showed you my dick, please respond” over them, implying that they’ve recently sent a picture of their penis to a woman and are being ignored. After the pictures spread, the text became a snowclone in which “dick” is replaced.

    Origin

    On January 29th, 2014, Tumblr user sassafrassle[1] posted an image she had received of a boy’s face with a variation of the text laid over it (shown below). The post gained 283 notes.



    Spread

    Though the post itself was not very popular, the image began circulating online in the coming years. On June 2nd, 2014, Buzzfeed[2] included it in a listicle titled “33 Reasons Why Men Should Be Banned.” The following day, it appeared on /r/cringepics[3] where it gained over 2,400 points. It appeared again over a year later on /r/cringeanarchy[4] where it gained over 4,800 points. Meanwhile, two other similar pictures began circulating online, though it is unclear if these are intentional or parodies of the original post. On October 27th, 2016, Instagram user moshinmauro[5] posted an image where the text read “I showed you my dick please respond” in a post that gained over 75 likes (shown below, left). On April 24th, 2017, Instagram user qwerticorn[6] posted another popular variation, gaining over 15,000 likes (shown below, right).



    Various parodies of the original post also began circulating during 2016. The text also grew into a snowclone on Twitter in which people replace “dick” with something else to show emotional vulnerability (examples shown below).




    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    And I Knew Everything Would Be Alright is an exploitable web comic series in which a woman expresses that she “knew everything would be alright” after hearing her love interest say a variety of humorous expressions.

    Origin

    On July 25th, 2015, the Blogspot blog Make Good Art posted a comic titled “Primeira Noite” (“First Night” in English) in which a man says “Como você é linda” (“How beautiful you are” in English") to a woman, leading her to think to herself “E eu soube que estava tudo bem” (“And I knew that everything was fine.” in English) (shown below).



    Spread

    On July 13th, 2017, Redditor wetpork submitted a post asking if an example of the meme was “worth it?” to /r/MemeEconomy,[3] where it gathered upwards of 6,600 points (92% upvoted) and 75 comments within 20 hours.

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Blogspot – Make Good Art

    [2]

    [3]Reddit – Worth it?


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  • 07/14/17--11:22: Sammy Sosa's Bleached Skin
  • About

    Sammy Sosa’s Bleached Skin refers to the jokes made about the pinkish hue of former Major League Baseball Star Sammy Sosa’s skin.

    Origin

    On July 11th, 2017, Sosa did an interview with ESPN Deportes which aired July 13th.[1] During the interview, Sosa wore a pink fedora and shirt. His skin also had a noticeably pinkish hue, concerning fans and inspiring jokes. The first joke was made on July 12th by @StraightOLC[2] and gained 65 retweets and over 160 likes (shown below).

    Spread

    Various Examples

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 07/14/17--13:26: #MyAgeInAPhrase
  • About

    #MyAgeInAPhrase is a hashtag game in which Twitter user write famous and/or descriptive expressions that allude to their age.

    Origin

    On July 13th, 2017, Twitter user @SheaBrowning[1] posted a four-panel image of the Smurfs, an MTV logo, Dukes of Hazard character Daisy Duke and a “Just Say No to Drugs” logo. The user captioned the post "I’m “Saturday morning cartoons, music videos on MTV, Daisy Duke poster on the bedroom wall, Just Say No to Drugs” years old. #MyAgeInAPhrase." This post (shown below) received more than 140 retweets and 700 likes.



    Spread

    @SheaBrowning is the host of @EsquireTags weekly hashtag games. The account releases a hashtag and others submit variations on the tag.[2] @EsquireTags tweeted the game in a tweet (shown below, left), whcih read “Let’s play: #MyAgeInAPhrase [I’m __ years old – but no numbers!] With @EsquireTags & @SheaBrowning.”

    @HashTag roundup, a hashtag game app, tweeted about the game as well (shown below, right).[3]



    Shortly after, other Twitter users began tweeting in responses (examples below). Twitter published a Moments[4] page to collect some of the most popular tweets.

    Several media outlets wrote about the popularity of the game, including BuzzFeed,[5] Uproxx,[6]

    Various Examples




    Search Interest

    External References


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