Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

older | 1 | .... | 367 | 368 | (Page 369) | 370 | 371 | .... | 636 | newer

    0 0
  • 05/12/17--13:24: Naked Man Riding a Shark
  • About

    Naked Man Riding a Shark refers to a controversial photograph of a heavyset naked man lying on top of a dead shark on a boat. While the identity of the man remains a mystery, people have accused several notable public figures, including Jimmy Johns founder John Liautaud, of being the culprit.

    Background

    On May 5th, 2017, Wildlife Conservationist Anneka Svenska[1] tweeted a picture (shown below) of a heavyset naked man lying on a boat lying on top of a dead shark and the caption Who is this man? Please RT, find him & ask him why he did this? Where is the humour in humiliating slaughtered animals?" Within one week, the tweet has received more than 1,200 retweets and 740 likes.

    External References


    0 0
  • 05/12/17--13:33: Thankful Reaction
  • About

    Thankful Reaction is a purple flower emoticon which was introduced by Facebook as a temporary reaction in mid May 2017 in anticipation of Mother’s Day. Following its release, the emoticon was featured in a number of parody images and spawned the catchphrase “thankful reacts only.”

    Origin

    On May 5th, 2016, Facebook began testing the “thankful” reaction in certain geographic locations. One of the first to spot the new emoticon was Twitter user @sreedevsharma.[1]



    Spread

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Twitter – @sreedevsharma

    [2]

    [3]


    0 0

    About

    The Sixteenth Amendment (Amendment XVI) to the United States Constitution allows the Congress to levy an income tax without apportioning it among the states or basing it on the United States Census. This amendment exempted income taxes from the constitutional requirements regarding direct taxes, after income taxes on rents, dividends, and interest were ruled to be direct taxes in the court case of Pollock v. Farmers’ Loan & Trust Co. (1895). The amendment was adopted on February 3, 1913.

    Origin

    Until 1913, customs duties (tariffs) and excise taxes were the primary sources of federal revenue. During the War of 1812, Secretary of the Treasury Alexander J. Dallas made the first public proposal for an income tax, but it was never implemented. The Congress did introduce an income tax to fund the Civil War through the Revenue Act of 1861. It levied a flat tax of three percent on annual income above $800. This act was replaced the following year with the Revenue Act of 1862, which levied a graduated tax of three to five percent on income above $600 and specified a termination of income taxation in 1866.

    An income tax amendment to the Constitution was first proposed by Senator Norris Brown of Nebraska. He submitted two proposals, Senate Resolutions Nos. 25 and 39. The amendment proposal finally accepted was Senate Joint Resolution No. 40, introduced by Senator Nelson W. Aldrich of Rhode Island, the Senate majority leader and Finance Committee Chairman.
    On July 12, 1909, the resolution proposing the Sixteenth Amendment was passed by the Congress and was submitted to the state legislatures. Support for the income tax was strongest in the western and southern states and opposition was strongest in the northeastern states.

    Spread

    Opposition to the Sixteenth Amendment was led by establishment Republicans because of their close ties to wealthy industrialists, although not even they were uniformly opposed to the general idea of a permanent income tax. In 1910, New York Governor Charles Evans Hughes, shortly before becoming a Supreme Court Justice, spoke out against the income tax amendment. While he supported the idea of a federal income tax, Hughes believed the words “from whatever source derived” in the proposed amendment implied that the federal government would have the power to tax state and municipal bonds. He believed this would excessively centralize governmental power and “would make it impossible for the state to keep any property”.

    Ratification (by the requisite 36 states) was completed on February 3, 1913 with the ratification by Delaware.

    Revenue Act of 1913

    The United States Revenue Act of 1913 also known as the Tariff Act, Underwood Tariff, Underwood Act, Underwood Tariff Act, or Underwood-Simmons Act, re-imposed the federal income tax following the ratification of the Sixteenth Amendment and lowered basic tariff rates from 40% to 25%, well below the Payne-Aldrich Tariff Act of 1909. It was signed into law by President Woodrow Wilson on October 3, 1913, and was sponsored by Alabama Representative Oscar Underwood.

    thought this would be a lot funnier big salvia out


    0 0
  • 05/08/17--09:27: Martha Stewart
  • About

    Martha Stewart is an American television personality, writer and entrepreneur known for her lifestyle brand, which encompasses a vast media empire of merchandising, television shows, books and magazines.

    Online History

    The founder of a multimedia empire, Stewart has amassed a large following online. She joined Twitter in February 2009, and as of May 2017, has over 3.7 million followers. Stewart’s lifestyle brand also has garnered a massive following on Instagram. Her official Instagram, @marthastewart,[6] has more than 1.3 million followers, while her personal one, @marthstewart48, has more than 116,000. Her facebook page has more than 2.2 million likes and 2.1 millions followers.[7]

    Bad Food Pictures

    In November 2013, several websites, including Buzzfeed[8] and Jezebel,[8] published stories questioning Stewart’s ability to take proper pictures of food. The photos, they say, often suffer from bad lighting, angles, and focus, with many of the photographs appearing blurry.



    On November 20th, 2013, Stewart responded to criticisms with another food picture. This photo (shown below) included the caption “Now if any one thinks this is a bad photo you are ridiculous. Tartuffi bianchi and fettuccine at le cirque.” The photo received more than 440 retweets and 320 likes.



    Martha & Snoop’s Potluck Dinner Party

    On November 7th, 2016, VH-1 premiered Martha & Snoop’s Potluck Dinner Party, a weekly variety show hosted by Martha Stewart and rapper Snoop Dogg.[13]Potluck Dinner Party is a mix of cooking show, celebrity interviews, sketches, and musical performances. The show has attracted such stars as Seth Rogen, Ice Cube, and Rick Ross and amassed more than a million viewers weekly.



    Trump Middle Finger Photo

    On May 6th, 2017, Stewart was photographed at the Frieze Art Fair at Randall’s Island Park in New York City between a portrait of President Donald Trump and the co-host of VH-1’s tv show _Martha & Snoop’s Potluck Dinner Party _, rappre Snoop Dogg. In the photo, she is holding a peace sign toward Snoop Dogg extending her middle finger toward a portrait of President Trump (shown below). The original Instagram post by user @newlin777 has been marked private, however, by that time, it had already received more than 2,600 likes and 120 comments.



    Stewart posted a alternate photograph of between the portraits, in which she is only holding up peace signs, along with the caption “A propos this week Taping twenty more episodes with @snoopdogg for @vh1 Watch the awards Sunday night !!! We are presenting! Photo @seenbysharkey I am at @frieze the giant art fair on Randall’s island NYC.”

    The post has received more than 3,900 likes. Several news media outlets covered the photograph, including Vanity Fair,[3] E!,[4] Uproxx[5] and more.



    Reputation

    Stewart is known as a savvy entrepreneur, building a media empire from the ground up, and becoming the first female self-made billionaire in American history. In 1982, Stewart published her first book, Entertaining, a cookbook filled with photos and recipes from Stewart’s own personal dinner party. Follow the success of Entertaining, she released several more books throughout the 80s. In 1990, she launched her magazine Martha Stewart Living, and 2002, the magazine’s circulation was more than 2 million copies per issue.

    Criticism

    Insider Trading Conviction

    On December 27th, 2001, Stewart successfully avoided a loss of more than $45,000 thanks to material, nonpublic advice from her stockbroker regarding the crashing ImClone Systems Stock.

    On June 4th, 2003, Stewart was indicted on nine counts, including lying about a stock sale.[10] In July 2004, the court sentenced Stewart to five months in prison and a fine of more than $41,000.[11] She was incarcerated between October 2004 and March 2005, after which she staged a successful comeback.



    Personal Life

    Born on August 3rd, 1941 in Jersey City, NJ, Stewart began working at age 10, babysitting for the children of several professional baseball players, including Mickey Mantle and Yogi Berra. She began working in TV as a model in commercials at age 15.

    Stewart married her first and only husband Andrew Stewart in 1961. Together, they had a child, Alexis, in 1965. They divorced in 1990.[12]

    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0

    About

    “Capitalism made your iPhone” is an argument used by Capitalists who mocks the Communists who carry an iPhone or other computer device, the argument is based on the iPhone and all consumer goods are created in a capitalist society, and that Communists have consumer goods would be a contradiction to their anti-capitalist ideology.

    WIP

    Various Examples







    0 0
  • 05/14/17--23:10: Klaus Nomi
  • About

    Klaus Sperber, also known as Klaus Nomi, was born on January 24, 1944 in Immenstadt, Bavaria, Germany. He was a German countertenor who was known for his wide vocal range and otherworldly stage persona.

    Career

    Mon coeur s’ouvre a ta voix

    In 1978 Nomi’s performance in “New Wave Vaudeville”, a four-night event, gained the attention of New York City’s art scene.

    He performed the aria “Mon coeur s’ouvre a ta voix” from the 1877 opera Samson et Delila written by Camille Saint-Saëns.

    Lightning Strikes

    The reaction was so positive that it gained him countless invitations to perform in clubs throughout New York City.

    Nomi would later join a band with Page Wood and Joe Katz, and Kristian Hoffman as their musical director. Together they created a pop cover of the Lou Christie song “Lightnin’ Strikes.”

    Simple Man

    Hoffman wrote several other pop songs that Klaus Nomi would be known for such as Simple Man, Total Eclipse, The Nomi Song, and After the Fall.

    Total Eclipse

    The Nomi Song

    After the Fall

    Several months before he died, Nomi replaced his on-stage attire with a Baroque-era outfit and a full collar. He began focusing on operatic pieces.

    The Cold Song

    On August 6, 1983 Klaus Nomi died from complications resulting from AIDS.

    He was one of the first celebrities to die an AIDS-related death.


    0 0
  • 05/15/17--04:37: Juri
  • Juri associates with all kinds of emotions. Basically whenever someone does his face in real life, and honestly, we all do it sometimes. Be it after a pun joke, a perverted joke, black humor joke, whenever we are high, or wake up after a night of partying and try to do our best to not look like a living corpse.

    Juri has been created when an user of discord, Derpivia, petrified an image of the well-known Jerry meme that has already been precropped and used as a profile picture. The result more than great and it was adapted as an emoji on numerous discord server. Starting on the server of Arf (the bork video remixer), then continuing to spread on a bunch of NSFW servers, then certain discord bot support servers, then /r/ Nekopara and soon everywhere.


    0 0
  • 05/15/17--05:47: K-Pop
  • [W.I.P. I have like, negative amount of interest in K-Pop, so sorry if I procrastinate on writing this]

    About

    K-Pop, short for Korean Pop, is a genre of music stemming from the South Korean pop music scene, often incorporating western styles and fashions into both their sound and image. In recent years, the genre has grown in popularity online with the advent of social media, leading to it garnering a growing fandom online.

    History

    While K-Pop has existed for many years, the modern variation of K-Pop did not being to develop until the 1990’s, when artists began to incorporate American musical styles into their works, such as “Hip-Hop”: and Techno. While the origin of modern K-Pop is attributed to the band Seo Taiji and Boys[1], K-Pop first began to grow in popularity in the west alongside the growth of bands such as H.O.T. [2], g.o.d.[3] and Shinhwa[4]

    Online Relevance

    Notable Artists

    EXO

    Girls’ Generation

    BTS

    2ne1

    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0

    About

    Avril Lavigne Is Dead is a conspiracy theory that Canadian pop singer Avril Lavigne died in 2003 while writing her sophomore album, 2004’s Under My Skin, and a doppleganger named Melissa Vandella has been posing as Lavigne ever since.

    Origin

    The conspiracy was first introduced by Liz at AvrilEstaMuerta,[1] a Brazilian blogspot, on May 6th, 2011. The conspiracy supposes that after Lavigne grew famous following her smash debut album, 2002’s Let Go, she hired a doppleganger named Melissa Vandella to distract the paparazzi, and Melissa and Avril became friends. While recording Under My Skin, Avril was found dead in her home, but everyone in the know kept quiet, and Melissa took her place. As evidence, Liz points to images of Lavigne in different times where she has different skin blemishes (shown below).



    Furthermore, lyrics from songs such as “Together” and “Nobody’s Home” can be interpreted to be references to the switch.

    From “Together”:

    Something is not right
    I can feel it inside of me
    The truth is not too far away.
    You can not deny
    When I turn off the lights
    When I close my eyes
    The truth comes to me and
    I’m living a lie

    Spread

    The story circulated on fan blogs for the following few years until Autumn of 2015. On September 30th, Buzzfeed reporter Ryan Broderick[5] tweeted about the conspiracy theory and AvrilEstaMuerta as a joke. Shortly after, blogs including Noisey[2] wrote about it, bringing the conspiracy to the global stage. The story was then picked up by Gawker,[3] who referenced a since-deleted post on ATRL.net that posited Avril could be alive but in hiding. The Gawker post also shows a screenshot of a Facebook post in which the alleged creator of the conspiracy admits to making it up as a social experiment to demonstrate how easy it is to fabricate a conspiracy. Later that year, Snopes[4] posted about the conspiracy, labeling it false.

    2017 Resurgence

    On May 12th, 2017, Twitter user @givenchyass[6] brought the conspiracy back into the public eye by tweeting a thread rehashing the evidence. The first tweet of their thread gained over 100,000 retweets (shown below). This sparked widespread media coverage of the theory, as BBC,[7] Mirror,[8] Jezebel,[9] and many more.



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 05/15/17--07:25: Two Scoops
  • Overview

    Two Scoops refers to TIME magazine story that reported President Donald Trump’s dinner with journalist in which he ordered his chef bring one scoop of ice cream for each of the reporters and two scoops for himself. “Two scoops” quickly became a joke online as people mocked the president’s two scoops as indicative of his apparent domineering personality.

    Background

    On May 11th, 2017, TIME magazine published an article entitled “Donald Trump After Hours,”[1] an exclusive, behind the scenes account of President Trump’s life living in the White House. One paragraph in the article, which described the president’s particular dining habits, specifically his wait staff brining him two scoops of ice cream with pie, while his guest get one, sparked a series of jokes. Reporters Michael Scherer AND Zeke J. Miller write:

    The waiters know well Trump’s personal preferences. As he settles down, they bring him a Diet Coke, while the rest of us are served water, with the Vice President sitting at one end of the table. With the salad course, Trump is served what appears to be Thousand Island dressing instead of the creamy vinaigrette for his guests. When the chicken arrives, he is the only one given an extra dish of sauce. At the dessert course, he gets two scoops of vanilla ice cream with his chocolate cream pie, instead of the single scoop for everyone else. The tastes of Pence are also tended to. Instead of the pie, he gets a fruit plate.

    Developments

    Shortly after posting the article, people online began mocking the President’s dessert choices, referring to it as an example of his lavish lifestyle and personality.



    The sketch comedy program also made references to the controversy on the May 13th episode. In the sketch, a parody of Donald Trump’s interview with NBC’s Lester Holt,[6] Trump rings a bell, and Paul Ryan delivers “two scoops” of ice cream to him.



    Others online made ironic jokes about how the ordering of two scoops of ice cream would lead to impeachment. On the /r/The_Donald subreddit, one redditor, Jalapenopepe, posted a picture of a screaming Stephen Colbert holding a gun (shown below) under the thread title "TWO SCOOPS?!?!?!? TWOSCOOPS?!?!?!? RREEEEEEEEEE] The post received more than 700 points (95% upvoted).



    Many online made this joke in conjunction with criticisms of CNN’s coverage of the “Two Scoops” controversy. Tweets lambasting the news network began appearing around 3pm that day, as CNN’s chyron read “PRESIDENTGETS 2 SCOOPS OF ICECREAM, EVERYONEELSE 1.”



    One report from CNN because the subject of ridicule on YouTube. The video "Two Scoops for Trump (shown below), published on May 11th, received more than 114,000 views, but an upvote-to-downvote ratio of 365 to 5,920, as of May 15th.



    Several other news sites reported on the “Two Scoops” controversy, including Buzzfeed,[3] New York magazine,[4] Uproxx,[5] and more.

    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 05/15/17--09:22: WannaCry Ransomware Attack
  • Overview

    The Wannacry Ransomware Attack was a global Microsoft Windows cyber-attack infecting upwards of 230,000 computers, which demanded victims pay ransoms in bitcoin to have access to their machines.

    Background

    In mid-April 2017, the hacker group Shadow Brokers released a collection of NSA hacking tools online, including a tool named EternalBlue exploiting a weakness in Microsoft Windows’ Server Message Block protocol. On April 21st, Ars Technica[1] reported that upwards of 107,000 computers were infected with the DoublePulsar[2] backdoor exploit tool. On May 12th, computers around the world were infected with the WannaCry ransomware program, which may have been executed through a spear phishing attack according to some researchers. When executed, the program initially checks a domain name as a “kill switch” before encrypting the user’s data and demanding a ransom of approximately $300 USD in bitcoin within 72 hours or $600 within one week.



    Developments

    According to the European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation (Europol), WannaCry was unprecedented in scale compared other cyber attacks in history. In England and Scotland, the attack infected computers and medical devices at National Health Service hospitals, leading NHS to turn away all non-critical emergencies. According to the Russian multinational cybersecurity company Kaspersky Lab,[6] the largest number of the attacks occurred in Russia, Ukraine, India and Taiwan.



    Kill Switch Discovery

    According to an interview with The Guardian, Twitter user @MalwareTech[3] claimed to have discovered that the WannaCry malware was attempting to connect to a specific domain after hearing news reports about the cyber attack. He then registered the domain for $10.69, which immediately engaged the program’s “kill switch,” halting its spread.



    That day, MalwareTech published a blog post titled “How to Accidentally Stop a Global Cyber Attacks,” explaining how engaging the kill switch was initially accidental.[4] Additionally, a video showing the spread of the program was uploaded to the MalwareTech YouTube channel (shown below).



    On May 13th, The Hacker News[5] reported that variations of the ransomware had been discovered with different kill switch domains and some that did not contain a kill switch at all.

    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 05/15/17--10:10: Y Tho
  • About

    Y Tho, an abbreviation of the question “why though?”, is a popular slang phrase usually asked in a trolling manner in response to a senseless action or statement. It later grew associated with a painting of a round, fat pope with a small face.

    Origin

    The earliest definition of "Y Tho was posted to Urban Dictionary by licia[1] on February 19th, 2007 (shown below).



    The phrase later became associated with a painting of Pope Leon X painted by Fernando Botero[2] (shown below, left). On December 12th, 2014, the “image macro” version of the painting with the “Y Tho” text was uploaded to Imgur (shown below, right), where it gained over 38,000 views.[3] A week later, the image was posted in a thread on /r/funny by user firstwarrior.[4]



    Spread

    After the image macro’s first appearance online, it began to spread as a popular reaction image to senseless scenarios. On May 12th, 2015, Imgur user collius[5] uploaded a hi-resolution version of the image macro, gaining 1.2 million views. On March 6th, 2016, Reddit user kvdence[6] uploaded the pic captioned “When yr mom says you can’t have a 3rd plate of food” to /r/funny, gaining 450 points (shown below).



    Meanwhile, the phrase itself continued to be used in various reaction images with the same context, as well as online in response to various statements and news.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Urban Dictionary – Y Tho

    [2]Art Gallery Artist – Fernando Botero index

    [3]Imgur – me irl

    [4]Reddit – firstwarrior post

    [5]Imgur – I got tired of your low res ‘y tho’

    [6]kvdence – y tho?


    0 0

    About

    “Star War: The Third Gathering -- The Backstroke of the West refers to a Chinese bootleg of the 2005 film Star Wars: Episode III -- Revenge of the Sith. The film became an internet phenomeon thanks to its poor subtitles, creating a series of memes, including Do Not Want.

    History

    On June 7th, 2005, blogger Jeremy Winterson[1] uploaded a series of photos from the chinese bootleg to Star Wars: Episode III -- Revenge of the Sith, entitled “Star War: The Third Gathers -- The Backstroke of the West.” Winterson’s blog created an internet sensation with the film’s poor subtitles, which look to either be overly literal or intentionally bad. The film became an instant source of mockery and considered an example of Engrish. Among the most famous examples of this is the translation of Anakin Skywalker’s line “This is where the fun begins,” which the film translates as “Game time started” (shown below, left) and Darth Vader’s infamous “NOOOOO!” translated to “Do not want” (shown below, right).



    Reception

    “The Backstroke of the West” grew in cult status since Winterson’s post. On September 15th, 2008, highlights of the bootleg made their way to YouTube (shown below), when YouTuber Engrish is funny posted a two minute reel of clips, “Backstroke of the West -- An Untold Love Story.” The video has since received more than 935,000 views.



    The film has since been uploaded (shown below) in its entirety to YouTube. On January 16th, 2016, YouTuber μ posted the entire film, which has received more than 224,000 views by May 2017.



    Fandom

    On October 1st, 2014, YouTuber Death Johnson Misc uploaded redubbed clips of Revenge of the Sith, replacing the film’s dialogue with the lines from “Backstroke to the West.” The video (shown below, left) went on to receive more than 1 million views. Death Johnson Misc went onto upload three more clip (shown below) videos of “Backstroke,” all of which received more than 80,000 views.





    More than a year later, YouTuber GratefulDeadpool uploaded a redubbed version of the film (shown below) in its entirety, reviving the bootleg’s viral video status. The video received more than 663,000 views in the first 14 months.



    Impact

    Related Memes

    Do Not Want

    Do Not Want, and its positive counterpart Do Want, are catchphrases typically used in reaction image macros to express one’s opinion on an image, video, or post. The phrase can also be modified with varying degrees of desire including “sort of want” and “don’t know if want.” It is used similarly to This Is Relevant to My Interests as a social cue to convey to other people whether the material is worth viewing.

    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 05/15/17--12:04: SpongeBob Licking Things
  • About

    SpongeBob Licking Things is a image macro series of the character from the animated series SpongeBob SquarePants witch is seen SpongeBob licking a poster.

    Origin

    At the end the episode “The Krusty Krab Training Video” spongebob is seen licking a Krabby Patty poster.

    Spread

    Various Examples

    Search Interest


    0 0
  • 05/15/17--12:08: "Modern Society" Parodies
  • About

    “Modern Society” Parodies are variations on an exploitable comic that shows many people standing in one line for an item, and one person standing in the other. In the variations, what the people are standing in line for is altered, and the product for which one person is standing line is considered superior.

    Origin

    The earliest dated appearance of the comic online was in a slideshow on SlideShare posted July 2nd, 2012.[1] In this version of the comic, the two lines represent “Those who don’t have time” and “Those who have time” (shown below).

    Spread

    Various Examples

    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References


    0 0
  • 05/15/17--12:55: MineCraft Awesome Parodys
  • About

    MineCraft Awesome Parodys is a YouTube channel based around parodies of popular songs with lyrics centered around the video game Minecraft. The channel’s videos are generally poorly drawn MS Paint drawings accompanied a kid badly ad-libbing Minecraft lyrics with poor audio quality over the instrumentals of the song the video is supposed to be a parody of. The channel has gained an ironic following over time and has gained over 90,000 subscribers and 5 million views in total.

    Origin

    The MineCraft Awesome Parodys channel was started on April 2nd, 2016. The same day the channel uploaded its first video “WE’LL MINEAGAIN | MINECRAFTPARODY OF WE’LL MEETAGAIN”(shown below). The video has currently over 50,000 views and 420 comments.


    Spread

    As the channel uploaded more videos, its popularity began to spread. The channel’s third upload: “MINEODDITY | MINECRAFTPARODY OF SPACEODDITY”(shown below), accumulated over 400,000 views.


    The channel’s most popular upload, however, is “MINEDIAMONDS | miNECRAFT PARODY OF TAKE ON ME”(shown below) which to date has 1,997,053 views and 18,326 comments.


    Around May 2017, more well known YouTubers began referencing the channel’s videos. On May 11, 2017, Youtube channel Grandayy uploaded a collaboration video with MineCraft Awesome Parodys titled “Minecraft Awesome Parodys – TNT”(shown below, left). On May 15, 2017, YouTuber Dolan Dark uploaded an edit of the original “Take on Me” video, replacing the original chorus with that of MAP’s parody(shown below, right).


    External References


    0 0
  • 05/15/17--13:21: Saturdays Are For The Boys
  • About

    Saturdays Are For The Boys is a catchphrase associated with sports-humor blog Barstool Sports. After appearing online, it became a hashtag celebrating male fraternity.

    Origin

    On June 11th, 2016, Barstool writer Feitelberg (@FeitsBarstool) tweeted:[1]

    FRIDAYSAREFORTHEMEN, SATURDAYSAREFORTHEBOYS
    - some old guy just yelled that, it makes no sense, but I love it"

    The tweet gained over 1,500 retweets and 4,600 likes (shown below).



    Spread

    Feitelberg’s followers responded with GIFs and images embodying the phrase “Saturday Is For The Boys.” On June 17th, he wrote a blog post about the phrase,[2] along with some of his favorite responses.



    Over the next few months, the hashtag took off, as men shared videos of their various acts of drunken debauchery with the hashtag on Instagram and Twitter. Major sports figures tweeted the hashtag as well, including Rob Gronkowski, Noah Syndegaard, and Michael Phelps. Barstool also began selling shirts with the phrase on it.[4] The spread of the hashtag was covered by The New York Post[3] in October of that year. In early 2017, Barstool writers filmed several athletes saying the phrase.[5]




    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 05/15/17--13:29: Oh, You Love Your Mom?
  • About

    “Oh, You Love Your Mom is a catchphrase used on Twitter that parodies music elitism. The phrase, which ends in “name three of her albums,” prompted others to tweet stereotypical mom sayings as if they were albums.

    Origin

    On May 13th, 2017, Twitter user @daviddeweil[1] tweeted “Oh you love your mom? Name three of her albums.” The tweet mocked musical gatekeeping or elitism by substituting a musical artist for “your mom.” @davidedeweil received more than 23,000 retweets and 48,000 likes.



    Spread

    Shortly after @daviddeweil’s tweet went viral, people started tweeting “album titles at him.” He recieved more than 1,300 response to his tweet. One tweet from @CTowersCBS[2] (shown below, left), which read “’I’m not going to say it again’ is her best work,” received more than 200 retweets and 1,000 likes. Another by @blackismy[3] (shown below, right), which featured several albums by “Your mom,” recieved more than 2,500 retweets and 5,800 likes in two days.

    On May 14th, Twitter published a Moments page, archiving some of the most popular posts and responses to the tweet.[4]


    On May 14th, Twitter published a Moments page, archiving some of the most popular posts and responses to the tweet.

    External References


    0 0
  • 05/15/17--14:23: Dependa
  • About

    Dependa, also known as Dependapotamus, is a pejorative referring to the wives of military service people who live off of their spouse’s earnings and are typically associated with being lazy and overweight.

    Origin

    On September 14th, 2008, Urban Dictionary[9] user Daemion submitted an entry for “dependapotamus,” defined as a “stay at home mom” who looks “remarkably similar to Jabba the Hut” (shown below).



    Spread

    In June 2013, the AntiDependa Facebook[10] page was launched, which features an illustration of a “Dependapotumus Version 4.3” as a profile picture (shown below).



    On January 14th, 2014, Urban Dictionary[1] user ricebarbiee submitted an entry for “Dependa,” defining it as a person who relies on their military husband for financial support (shown below).



    On March 21st, Redditor nathanpaulyoung submitted a screenshot of a green text story on 4chan about a “Dependapotamus” trying to get into a public pool for free (shown below). Prior to being archived, the post received more than 1,700 (96% upvoted) and 70 comments on /r/4chan.[8] On April 27th, the Dependa as Fuck Facebook[11] page was created.



    On November 2nd, the Dear Dependa Tumblr[3] blog was launched, described as “a page dedicated to stupid shit Dependas say.” On April 5th, 2015, Redditor TBCGirl posted a story about the overweight spouse of a military service person titled “Dependa Logic: Taking Candy From a Baby” to /r/fatpeoplestories.[2] On September 19th, Imgur[4] user JazzAxxxelrod submitted a gallery titled “For you troops out there, some funny dependa memes” (shown below).



    On October 3rd, 2016, the Military Memes Facebook[5] page posted a photograph of a woman doing pushups in front of a drill instructor with the caption “You said you’re a servicemember too / Do work, Dependa!” (shown below, left). Within seven months, the post gained over 1,000 reactions and 140 shares. On November 19th, the Pop Smoke Facebook[6] page posted an Evil Miss Piggy meme joking about the inner monologue of a Dependa (shown below, right). Within six months, the post received more than 9,900 shares, 5,700 reactions and 1,400 comments.



    In March 2017, The Honest Dependa YouTube channel was launched, featuring various military-themed comedy sketches.[7]On May 15th, Salon[12] published an article describing “Dependa” as “an ugly meme” and “sexist stereotype.”



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 05/15/17--16:55: Imgflip
  • About

    Imgflip is a meme creator, image uploading, gif generator, and pie chart making site that allows you create and share meme on a wide variety of social networks. Created in 2008 by Dylan Wenzlau[1], the earliest know date of this site goes back to June 14th, 2008[2], the site was under private control and is fixed over the years with minor improvements. On December 1st, 2012, Imgflip becomes a flesh out website that now has new features like a leaderboard, easy access links, front page, and a like/dislike bar[3]. Here is what the their about page has to say[4]:

    Imgflip is a simple and fast website for creating and sharing images. We specialize in memes and GIFs.

    The Imgflip image generators are designed to be insanely fast and provide powerful customization, while still being simple and easy to use. Images created on Imgflip can be made “private” if you just want to download the image and save it for yourself, or they can be saved on imgflip.com where you can share them with friends and track their popularity. If you think your images will be appreciated by most imgflip users, you can submit them to be featured. Imgflip users and/or moderators can then vote on your submitted images, and the best ones will make it to the homepage.

    You can browse imgflip content in several ways

    • Hot/Latest images on the homepage
    • Use the Previous / Next / Random navigation on
    • Use the hotkeys as described on
    • Tag pages such as cats
    • Meme pages such as Grumpy Cat, found on the meme templates page
    • If you have any suggestions, comments, or if you’d like to report a bug, please use the feedback form. If you want an image an removed, please submit a removal request.

    Contact: general@imgflip.com

    History

    Oldest Known Meme On Imgflip

    Around March 2011, this was uploaded by anonymous which featuring Insanity Wolf. As of May 15th, 2017, it currently has 921 views, 33 upvotes, and 45 comments[5].

    Most Upvoted Meme

    Around February 2016, a gif was uploaded by Crotchgoblin, under the title, “If you watch this for more that 10 seconds without upvoting you are a bad person”. As of May 15th, 2017, the post has 15,666 views, 605 upvotes, 144 comments[6].

    Top 10 Users

    1. Raydog
    2. DashHopes
    3. socrates
    4. Jying
    5. Octavia_Melody
    6. rpc1
    7. Juicydeath1025
    8. reallyitsjohn
    9. ghostofchruch
    10. Lynch1979

    Controversy

    Work In Progress

    Community

    Work In Progress

    Meme Examples

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Graphiq – Dylan Wenzlau

    [2]WayBackMachine – Imgflip.com

    [3]WayBackMachine – Imgflip.com

    [4]Imgflip – About

    [5]Imgflip – Oldest Known Meme

    [6]Imgflip – Most Upvoted Meme


older | 1 | .... | 367 | 368 | (Page 369) | 370 | 371 | .... | 636 | newer