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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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    About

    What Does It Look Like I Do For A Living? is the name of a Twitter trend in which users post selfies and ask their followers to describe what it looks like they do for a living based on the picture. This usually results in the followers roasting the poster by describing jobs which mock their appearance.

    Origin

    According to Twitter Moments,[1] the first instance was posted on August 15th, 2016 by @Sicksteen_216,[2] who posted a selfie with the question and was immediately roasted with quips like “door-to-door selling Jesus” and “Snoop Dogg impersonator.”



    Spread

    The “What does it look like I do for a living” posts experienced a massive surge on November 14th, 2016, particularly on Black Twitter. By the end of the day, it had spawned absurdist variations where people posted strange pictures instead of selfies. The trend was covered on Complex,[3] Daily Dot,[4] Vibe,[5] and more.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References


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  • 11/15/16--11:25: Evil Kermit
  • About

    Evil Kermit is a captioned image series featuring a screenshot of the Muppet character Kermit the Frog talking with a menacing Star Wars Sith Lord version of himself, who instructs him to perform various indulgent, lazy, selfish and unethical acts.

    Origin

    On November 6th, 2016, Twitter user @aaannnnyyyyaaaa[1] tweeted a screenshot of Kermit the Frog standing next to a Sith version of himself with the caption “me: sees a fluffy dog / me to me: steal him” (shown below). Within 10 days, the tweet gained over 31,800 likes and 22,500 retweets.



    Spread

    The following day, Twitter user @PinkMiruku[7] posted an Evil Kermit who instructs her to skip class, receiving upwards of 12,200 likes and 10,200 retweets over the next eight days (shown below, left). On November 8th, 2016, Twitter user @kenihanas[8] tweeted the picture along with a caption about feeling tempted to spend his saved money (shown below, right).



    On November 12th, Twitter user @jola_jade tweeted the image captioned with a mock dialogue in which her conscious tells her to “overreact” (shown below, left). Within 72 hours, the tweet accumulated more than 54,000 likes and 40,700 retweets. On November 14th, Twitter user @BreaSimone[9] tweeted the Kermit image captioned with a joke about arguing with her boyfriend (shown below, right). In 24 hours, the tweet garnered upwards of 37,000 likes and 28,000 retweets.



    That day, the pop culture news site Pop Sugar published a slideshow of Evil Kermit examples. That same day, Cheezburger[5] published a post about the trending captioned images. Also on November 14th, Twitter[6] launched a moments page for the series titled “Evil Kermit wants you to indulge in your vices.” On November 15th, 2016, Redditor Hcyon1 submitted a post titled “Evil Kermit memes are growing buy now buy now” to the /r/MemeEconomy[3] subreddit. Meanwhile, BuzzFeed[4] published a listicle of Evil Kermit examples.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/15/16--11:38: Pop Team Epic
  • WIP




    About

    Pop Team Epic (also known as Poptepipic) (ポプテピピック, Poputepipikku) is a 4koma absurd comedy manga series by the doujin artist bkub, known online for his Touhou Project comics and his portrayal of the character Chen. The series gained a huge following in the western net after it started getting translated in early 2016, inspiring several parodies.

    History

    Online Relevance

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/15/16--11:38: Tortilla Supermoon
  • About

    Tortilla Supermoon was a popular trend on Twitter on November 14th, 2016. On that night, the moon was as close to the Earth as it had been since 1948, making it appear particularly large, earning it the nickname “supermoon.” As photos of the supermoon spread, some Twitter users took pictures of tortillas stuck to windows and tried to pass them off as their own supermoon photos.

    Origin

    The picture most commonly associated with the “Tortilla Supermoon” was first posted on February 10th, 2016, by Twitter user @savannimalz[1] with the caption “The moon looks beautiful tonight.” The tweet, shown below, has over 17,000 retweets and 24,000 favorites as of November 15th, 2016.



    Spread

    On the evening of the supermoon, @savannimalz picture spread without credit as users joked how the tortilla in the picture looked like it could be the supermoon. It also inspired dozens of similar posts where users stuck tortillas to their windows and called it the supermoon. Huffington Post[2] picked up on the trend the following morning. It was also a Twitter Moment.[3]

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/15/16--15:19: Planet Earth
  • About

    Planet Earth is a 2006 British nature documentary TV series produced by the BBC and starring English broadcaster and naturalist David Attenborough as the narrator. Upon its premiere in March 2006, the series was met with critical acclaims for the quality and size of its production value, particularly its use of high-definition photography and cinematic exploration of different habitats on Earth, including the Antarctic and Arctic regions, mountains, caves, deserts, jungles and deep ocean, among others.

    History

    The concept for the episodic nature documentary TV series was largely inspired by the wildly successful reception of The Blue Planet, BBC’s universally acclaimed 2001 series on the natural history of the world’s oceans. In January 2002, British nature documentary producer Alastair Fothergill and BBC One formally agreed to produce a similar TV series based on The Blue Planet formula, only with a larger scope looking at the entire planet. The series, which consisted of eleven one-hour long episodes, premiered on BBC One on March 5th, 2006 and ran for nine months before the airing of its finale on December 10th, 2006. Five years in the making, it was the most expensive nature documentary series ever commissioned by the BBC and also the first to be filmed in high definition.

    Reception

    [researching]

    Accolades

    Highlights

    [researching]

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/15/16--18:33: Tickle Me Elmo
  • About

    Tickle Me Elmo is a children’s plush toy from Tyco Preschool, a division of Tyco Toys, based on the character Elmo from the children’s Muppet television show, Sesame Street. When squeezed, Elmo chortles and vibrates.

    History

    “Tickles The Chimp”, the precursor to Tickle Me Elmo, was invented by Ron Dubren and Greg Hyman in 1992. In 1992, it was presented to Tyco Preschool as “Tickles The Chimp,” which was a toy monkey with a computer chip which laughed when tickled. At the time Tyco didn’t have rights to make Sesame Street plush, but did have Looney Tunes plush rights so it was worked on for several months as Tickle Me Tasmanian Devil. A short time later, Tyco lost rights to do Looney Tunes but gained the rights to Sesame Street, thus starting Tickle Me Elmo. The invention was originally introduced under Cabbage Patch at Hasbro Industries.

    Neil Friedman, who was then president of Tyco Preschool, recalled years later that, “When you played with [Tickle Me Elmo] for the first time, it brought a smile to everyone’s face. It was a magical surprise.”

    Spread

    W.I.P.

    Various Examples

    Search Interest


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  • 11/04/16--12:20: Life Comes At You Fast
  • About

    Life Comes At You Fast is a phrase popularly used on Twitter to caption unfortunate events either written or illustrated in photos and gifs.

    Origin

    The phrase “Life Comes At You Fast” was popularized in 2004 by American insurance company Nationwide when they launched the “life comes at you fast” ad campaign.[1] The campaign humorously demonstrated how quickly things could go wrong in life to demonstrate why their insurance was necessary.



    Spread

    The joke began appearing on Twitter around 2013. One of the earliest known examples was posted by @MyNig[2] on October 3rd, 2013.



    In the coming two years, “Life Comes At You Fast” became a popular caption to graphics and stories on Twitter,[3] particularly in reference to politics and sports. A Complex[4] article referenced the phrase talking about rapper Tyga. Deadspin[5] did as well in an article linking to a tweet about basketball player Hasheem Thabeet.



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/04/16--23:32: Pokémon VGC
  • Pokémon Video Game Championship (shorten to VGC by the Pokémon fanbase) AKA Pokémon World Championships is the official competitive battle format. It is usually held in August by Play! Pokémon, which is formed by The Pokémon Intentional Company.

    The differences between the battle format that Smogon used is the battle format is in Doubles rather than Single, thus making the battle more fast-paced. In addition, the player can only bring four Pokémon out of six Pokémon to the battlefield. Item Clause is in effect as well, meaning that more than two Pokémon in the team cannot hold the same item. And Mythical Pokémon aren’t allowed in any VGC format.

    History:

    The first ever World Championship event was run by Wizards of the Coast, a division of Hasbro, on August 2002 in Seattle, WA, it focuses solely on the trading card game. Eventually, Wizards transfers the right of the trading card game to Nintnedo.

    Nintendo resumed the World Championship in 2004. However, the first four World Championships held by Nintnedo still focus on trading card games, it wasn’t until 2009 where they introduced the Video Game Championship format. Each VGC format comes with their own unique rule.

    Generation V banned the moves Dark Void and Sky Drop, the latter have to do with a particular glitch, though these bans were eventually lifted in Generation VI. From VGC14 and on, it introduced the blue pentagon rule, a Pokémon must be native to X and Y (later Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire) in order to participate the tournament, otherwise it can’t. VGC16 allows normally restricted legendary Pokémon to participate, but no more than two can be allowed.

    Reception:

    The video game format is very popular among the competitive Pokémon playerbase.

    Despite this, numerous fans have criticized VGC for the lack of variety, VGC15 is a notorious case of it as most teams consist of Cresselia, Heatran, Amooguss Landorus-Therian, and Mega Kangaskhan (shorten to CHALK). VGC16 has also been initially criticized for it as well, this time, most teams consist of Groudon, Kyogre, Xerneas, Talonflame and Smeargle

    Another aspect that VGC has been criticized for is slipping hacked Pokémon. People have noticed that Ray Rizzio used an Aegislash with a Dream Ball, which is impossible for a Pokémon introduced in Generation VI to be in it. Despite Ray’s claim, there are evidence that he actually hacked it.

    h2.Impact

    A website by the name of Nugget Bridge focus heavily on VGC. In addition, Smogon has provided several Pokémon analysis for the VGC format.

    Related Meme:

    Pachirisu

    As the blue pentagon rule only allows Articuno, Zapdos and Moltres, Zapdos is commonly used because it’s the only legendary Pokémon that isn’t extremely weak to Rock-type as well as being the fastest of the trio.

    Se Jun Park, a Korean player, has a Pachirisu in his team, a Pokémon that isn’t commonly used in competitive battles. Pachirisu has a particular move called Follow Me, which redirects any attacks. It happens to have its hidden ability, Volt Absorb, allowing it to recover health from Electric-type moves instead. Other arsenal includes Super Fang, a move which cuts the HP of the target by half and Nuzzle, a weak Electric-type attack that always paralyzes the target. Pachirisu holds Sitrus Berry, allowing it to heal 25% of its max HP if it HP reaches less than 50%.

    Many were surprised that how long Pachirisu has stayed in the battlefield than they expected. Eventually, Se Jun Park won the Master Division of VGC on August 17th, 2014. Because of that darkhorse victory, several fanarts, news articles, and memes have spawned for this particular electric squirrel.

    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    Wow Queen, You’re So Beautiful is an exploitable meme usually involving two characters or persons, with the one on the left complimenting the one on the right with the phrase, “Wow Queen, you’re so beautiful.”

    Origin

    On April 13, 2016, Instagram user @eboni._ posted the original drawing[1] which features Max from The Goofy Movie talking to the character Roxanne. It was posted with the caption, “Quick sketch of Max and Roxanne.”



    Spread

    The image struck many as bizarre and cringeworthy. People have noted how strange it is that Roxanne is wearing a Thrasher shirt and that Max looks much more like Goofy than Max.[2] One of the more popular photoshops pairs the image with the caption “Good morning to everyone except the one who drew this picture” (shown below).



    The image inspired many parodies where users attempted further cringeworthy drawings. Some people went as the image for Halloween that year, while others paired the caption with different images. It was also covered by The Daily Dot[3] on November 16th, 2016.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/16/16--09:17: Baseball Crank
  • About

    Baseball Crank is an image of a screaming baseball that is popularly used in photoshops on Twitter, particularly Weird Twitter.

    Origin

    The Baseball Crank image is the avatar of conservative lawyer, writer, and Twitter personality Dan McLaughlin, whose handle is baseballcrank.[1] Towards the end of April 2016, the image drew the fascination of the comedy/politics podcast Chapo Trap House , who described the image as emblematic of the Republican #NeverTrump community’s anguish.[2] According to a Storify[3] of Baseball Crank tweets from Bob George (@Odd_Hack), the first tweeted photoshop of the baseball crank came on April 27th, 2016, from @BenghaziExpert,[4] who inserted the picture over Ted Cruz and Heidi Cruz talking to Sean Hannity.



    Spread

    In the following days, the members of Chapo Trap House and its fans began photoshopping the Baseball Crank image into dozens of famous photographs and works of art such at The Shining, Vermeer’s “Girl With The Pearl Earring,” Van Gogh’s “Starry Night,” and many more. The spread of the photoshops drew media coverage from The Daily Dot[5] and Law360.[6] McLaughlin, evidently not a fan of the meme, blocks anyone who tweets Baseball Crank photoshops at him.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/16/16--11:11: #UNameItChallenge
  • About

    #UNameItChallenge is a series of hip hop remixes based on a video clip of American gospel singer Shirley Caesar naming off various Thanksgiving food dishes before loudly singing “you name it!”, which is often accompanied by footage of professional dancers.

    Origin

    On December 5th, 2010, the Pannellctp Traditional Gospel Music uploaded footage of Caeser performing the gospel song “Holy My Mule,” which gained over 1.1 million views over the next six years (shown below).



    “I got beans, greens, potatoes, tomatoes, lamb, rams, hogs, dogs, chicken, turkeys, rabbits -- you name it!”

    In November 2016, Instagram user RemixGodSuede posted a hip-hop remix of the video, which has since been removed from the site. On November 11th, singer-songwriter Chris Brown reposted the remix on Instagram[1] with the caption “Grandma what you plan on cooking for Thanksgiving?” (shown below). Within four days, the video gathered upwards of 1.3 million views and 9,000 comments.


    U name it!!!!

    A video posted by 1 YOU 2 HATE (@chrisbrownofficial) on



    Spread

    On November 12th, YouTuber remixgodsuede uploaded footage of a dance group along with the remix playing in the background (shown below, left). On November 13th, Twitter user @DrTGIF[2] posted the original video of Caesar’s gospel performance. The following day, Chris Brown posted footage of himself dancing to the remix while wearing a purple hoodie on Instagram[5] (shown below, right). Over the next two days, the video garnered more than 1.9 million views and 12,800 comments.



    On November 14th, Twitter user @TheShadeRoom posted a hip-hop remix of the video paired with footage of Beyoncé dancing in music videos and at live performances (shown below).




    Meanwhile, Instagram user airmaxjunkie[3] uploaded a clip of himself performing a vegan-themed freestyle rap over a #UNameItChallenge remix (shown below, left). The same day, Instagram user _icomplexity[4] uploaded a remix of the gospel accompanied by clips of various choreographed dance performances (shown below, right). In 48 hours, the posts gathered more than 68,000 and 150,000 views respectively.




    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Instagram – chrisbrownofficial

    [2]Twitter – @DrTGIF

    [3]Instagram – airmaxjunkie

    [4]Instagram – _icomplexity

    [5]Instagram – chrisbrownofficial


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  • 11/16/16--18:07: What's Up Noodle Man
  • Whats Up Noodle Man Was First Said By Crazy Critical On The Youtube Video Called Shitage Cringe And Was Also Used By Nick Lerson In The Video whatsupnoodleman.mp0.


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    About

    Trump Is Coming” (#TrumpIsComing) is a participatory video fad in which a group of people scatter frantically away from the camera at the cue of someone yelling that Donald Trump, the president-elect of the United States, is on his way. The challenge went viral in mid-November 2016 as a spin-off meme of the Andy’s Coming video fad.

    Origin

    The original instance of the video challenge was uploaded by Twitter user @EmiChavez on the morning of November 9th, 2016, the day after Donald Trump emerged as the winner in the presidential election. In the video, a crowd of students can be seen running away from the camera while screaming frantically after Chavez yells “Trump is coming!” (shown below)


    Precursor

    “Andy’s Coming!” is a participatory video fad in which a group of people suddenly fall to the ground and play dead at the cue of someone yelling the memorable quote from the 1995 American computer-animated film Toy Story. The challenge went viral shortly after the Mannequin Challenge took off in early November 2016.



    Spread

    In the following days, several videos of high school students recreating the stunt surfaced on Twitter under the hashtags #TrumpIsComing and #TrumpIsComingChallenge. On November 17th, the Trump-themed hashtag challenge was picked up by Cheezburger, TIME, Mashable, GQ, The Guardian and Yahoo News.

    Various Examples

    As of November 17th, there are at least a dozen video examples of the challenge that have garnered more than 100 likes and retweets on Twitter.



    External References


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  • 11/17/16--09:11: Chapo Trap House
  • About

    Chapo Trap House is a humorous political podcast with leftist spin hosted by Will Menaker, Matt Christman and Felix Biederman. They were later joined by journalists Virgil Texas and Amber A’Lee Frost. They are popular Twitter personalities, particularly in the leftist and Weird Twitter communities. The podcast is released weekly and skewers political pundits in the center-left and right, such as Ross Douthat of The New York Times and Dan McLaughlin.[3]

    History

    The three men first appeared together on the podcast Street Fight Radio to mock 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi. Following the success they had there, they decided to start Chapo Trap House.[1] They released their first episode on March 12th, 2016.[2]



    Their podcast was met with immediate praise, and it quickly became a cult-favorite among the shows’ followers. The AV Club[4] wrote a favorable review of the podcast’s second episode on March 28th, 2016, saying “it feels like an absolutely essential listen.” On July 29th, they were interviewed by Paste Magazine,[1] and described their comedy as an alternative to leftist media which they find dominated by smugness. Christman described it as an alternative to:

    “smug above-it-all snark of The Daily Show or the quaver-voiced earnestness of, like Chris Hedges or something. Neither of those models offer the visceral thrill of listening to people who actually give a shit (as opposed to the wan liberalism of people who are mostly interested in showing how much smarter they are than Republicans) but who don’t believe that having a sense of humor is counter-revolutionary.”

    The group also received praise from The Advocate[5] and Mediaite.[6] Its critics include Reason[7] writer Robby Soave who accused the hosts of cheering for revoking freedom of speech for right-wing publications.

    Online Presence

    The group is most popular on Twitter. Individually, Christensen ( @cushbomb )[8] has over 15,500 followers, Menaker ( @willmenaker )[9] has over 13,700, and Felix Biederman ( @ByYourLogic )[10] has over 21,400. The @ChapoTrapHouse[11] Twitter has over 12,100 as of November 17th, 2016. The Chapo Trap House Facebook page[12] has over 2,000 fans, and their subreddit[13] has 669 readers.

    Baseball Crank

    Chapo Trap House is responsible for the Baseball Crank meme, in which the Twitter avatar of conservative blogger Dan McLaughlin was photoshopped into hundreds of famous photographs and works of art.



    Search Interest

    External References


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    Overview

    The Facebook Fake News Controversy describes the conversation surrounding social media site Facebook’s propensity to promote news articles with sensationalist headlines and which contain false information in users’ timelines. The controversy drew particular attention following the election of Donald Trump, as critics suggested the false information spread on fake news sites with conservative leanings may have helped him win the election.

    Background

    On October 12th, 2016, The Washington Post[7] published an article addressing the prevalence of fake news stories that were promoted by Facebook’s Trending feature, which reported that at least five fake stories had been identified as trending content by the social network’s algorithm during its three-week study. On October 26th, BuzzFeed News[4] ran an investigative article similarly highlighting the growing number of fake news stories in high-volume circulation on Facebook since the company dissolved its team of human news editors. On November 3rd, BuzzFeed News[5] published another report on its finding of at least 140 pro-Trump U.S. political news sites that had been launched by various locals in the town of Veles, Macedonia over the past year.



    Developments

    On November 9th, 2016, the day that Donald Trump was declared the winner of the 2016 United States presidential election, New York Magazine[1] ran an article titled “Donald Trump Won Because of Facebook,” which sharply criticized Facebook’s inability or neglect to contain the viral spread of hoaxes or fake news stories about the candidates as a major factor that shaped the public opinion of the voters and influenced the outcome of the election. Furthermore, the article alleged that Facebook ultimately empowered Donald Trump’s stature by allowing the circulation of stories from partisan and opinionated news sites that are mainly driven by for-profit agendas rather than journalism.

    Facebook Response

    On November 10th, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg[6] flat out dismissed the accusations as a “crazy idea” while speaking at the Technonomy conference in Half Moon Bay, California.

    “Personally I think the idea that fake news on Facebook, which is a very small amount of the content, influenced the election in any way -- I think is a pretty crazy idea. Voters make decisions based on their lived experience.”

    He later added in a lengthy Facebook post:[8]

    “Of all the content on Facebook, more than 99% of what people see is authentic. Only a very small amount is fake news and hoaxes. Overall, this makes it extremely unlikely hoaxes changed the outcome of this election in one direction or the other… I am confident we can find ways for our community to tell us what content is most meaningful, but I believe we must be extremely cautious about becoming arbiters of truth ourselves.”

    However, it was revealed that Facebook employees had previously worked to stop the spread of fake news in May with a fake news-identifying extension that never was put to use for fear of conservative backlash.[9] Dissatisfied with Zuckerberg’s deflection to the post-election criticism, Facebook employees were reported on November 15th to have formed a “secret task force” to combat the spread of fake news.[10]

    Meanwhile, Google and Facebook announced an endeavor to stop running ad-selling software on fake news sites.[11]

    List of Fake News Sites

    Responding to the controversy, professor Melissa Zimdars created a Google Doc[12] with an extensive list of websites that give false, sensationalist, clickbait-y, and satirical news for people to identify, along with a categorization system so that people may differentiate. The Daily Dot[13] covered the list on November 16th and posted the 130 sites Zimdars listed.

    Washington Post Article

    On November 17th, 2016, The Washington Post[14] posted an interview with a fake Facebook news writer named Paul Horner, who took responsibility for Trump’s election.

    “My sites were picked up by Trump supporters all the time. I think Trump is in the White House because of me. His followers don’t fact-check anything -- they’ll post everything, believe anything. His campaign manager posted my story about a protester getting paid $3,500 as fact. Like, I made that up. I posted a fake ad on Craigslist.”

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/17/16--10:10: Mike Pence
  • About

    Mike Pence is a Republican politician and Vice President-elect of the United States. As a staunch Christian conservative, Pence has opposed legislation in favor of comprehensive sex education, abortion and LGBT rights.

    History

    Following two unsuccessful Indiana congressional campaigns in 1988 and 1990, Pence became the president of the Indiana Policy Review Foundation free-market think tank. In 1992, Pence began hosting The Mike Pence Show talk radio program. In 2000, Pence defeated Democratic opponent Robert Rock for a congressional seat in Indiana’s 2nd district, adopting a campaign slogan describing himself as “A Christian, a conservative and a Republican, in that order.” In 2012, Pence defeated Democratic candidate John R. Gregg and Libertarian nominee Rupert Boneham to become governor of Indiana.

    2016 Vice Presidential Campaign

    During the 2016 Republican presidential primary, Pence endorsed Ted Cruz as the party’s nominee. On May 3rd, 2016, Donald Trump became the presumptive nominee after winning the Indiana primary. On July 15th, Trump announced on Twitter[1] that Pence had been chosen as his vice presidential running mate. The following day, Trump introduced Pence as his running man during a campaign event at the New York Hilton Midtown hotel (shown below, left). On July 18th, the Super Deluxe YouTube channel uploaded an edited version of the announcement speech (shown below, right).



    Vice Presidential Debate

    On October 4th, 2016, Pence participated in a vice presidential debate against Democratic rival Tim Kaine (shown below, left). During the debate, Kaine accused Donald Trump of saying “Mexicans are rapists and criminals” to which Pence retorted “Senator, you whipped out that Mexican thing again." That evening, the gaffe was widely mocked on Twitter along with the hashtag “#ThatMexicanThing”. The following day, the Schmoyoho YouTube channel posted an auto-tuned version of the debate (shown below, right).



    Controversies

    Gay Conversion Therapy

    In 2000, Pence’s campaign website contained a stipulation the Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency (CARE) Act, arguing that government resources aimed at preventing the spread of the HIV virus should be “directed toward those institutions which provide assistance to those seeking to change their sexual behavior.” The statement was widely interpreted as an endorsement of conversion therapy,[3] which aims to change a person’s sexual orientation from homosexual to heterosexual. In October 2016, a photo of Pence’s head captioned with the accusation that Pence supported electroshock “gay conversation therapy” began circulating on social media (shown below). On October 26th, Snopes[2] published an article titled “Shock Treatment,” listing the claim made in the image as “Mixture.”



    Religious Freedom Restoration Act

    In March 20th, Pence signed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which was widely criticized by those who claimed the bill permits discrimination against LGBT individuals.

    Abortion Rights

    Also in March 2016, Pence signed House Bill 1337 into law, which banned abortion procedures on reasons related to the fetus’ race, gender or fetal abnormality. Additionally, the law required abortion providers to bury or cremate all fetal remains. The law was widely criticized by abortion rights activists and a federal court issued a preliminary injunction blocking the bill from taking effect.

    Online Presence

    Planned Parenthood Donation Prank

    On November 11th, 2016, artist Bethany Cosentino posted a message on Instagram[7] urging readers to donate to Planned Parenthood in Pence’s name (shown below). Within five days, the post gained over 13,800 likes and 1,300 comments.



    The image was widely circulated across various social media platforms, with reposts by actress Amber Tamblyn and comedian Amy Schumer. Additionally, Twitter users began posting screenshots of their Planned Parenthood donations in Pence’s name. On November 16th, the Indianapolis Star[8] reported that Planned Parenthood had received upwards of 20,000 donations in Pence’s name.



    Selfie Photograph

    On November 17th, 2016, Republican congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers tweeted a selfie photograph of the House Republicans taken by Mike Pence with a selfie stick (shown below, left).[4] Shortly after, the House Republicans Twitter feed posted an alternate angle in which Pence is shown holding the selfie stick (shown below, right).[5]



    On Twitter, the many mocked the photograph for showing only white people (shown below). That day, UpRoxx[6] highlighted several notable reactions to the photographs.



    Related Memes

    Periods for Pence

    Periods for Pence is an online campaign encouraging abortion-rights activists to direct detailed descriptions of their menstrual cycles toward Pence to protest his support of legislation restricting women’s reproductive freedom.

    /pol/ Nicknames

    On 4chan’s /pol/ (politically incorrect) board, posters often create threads dedicated to listing various homophobic nicknames for Pence. On November 10th, 2016, Redditor AustralianShitPoster posted a screenshot of Pence nicknames. The same day, Redditor SH11TPOSTER submitted a similar collection of Pence nicknames taken from /pol/, gathering more than 4,400 votes (95% upvoted) and 100 comments over the next week (shown below).



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/17/16--12:25: Peach Emoji
  • About

    Peach Emoji is an iPhone emoji that gained notoriety for its visual similarity to a buttox, leading it to be popularly used in sexting and other instances of sexual innuendo.

    Origin

    In October 2010, Unicode 6.0 introduced the Peach Emoji[1] (shown below). Over the next few years, the peach emoji became widely used to depict a butt due to their visual similarity as perceived by many users, which led to the monikers “butt emoji” and the “bottom emoji," according to Emojipedia.[2]



    Spread

    On March 15th, 2015, Urban Dictionary[3] user queen.of.sass submitted the top definition of the peach emoji, which reads “the emoticon of the peach or for people with immature minds it is the emoticon of the ass.” On Instagram, the hashtag #Peach[4] has over 243,000 posts (as of November 2nd, 2016), with many of the pictures prominently featuring a butt.

    Change Controversy

    On October 31st, 2016, Apple introduced iOS 10.2, which features version 9.0 of Unicode and a new set of emojis.[5] Among the new emojis, Unicode offers an updated version of the peach emoji that many felt no longer looked like a butt.



    The change was met with backlash from users who appreciated the old peach emoji’s resemblance to a butt. The following day, many media outlets covered the online backlash to the change, including SelectAll,[6] Buzzfeed,[7] and Slate.[8]



    Due to the widespread backlash, Apple returned the peach to its previous, butt-like appearance in iOS 10.3 on November 15th, 2016.



    The change was met with praise, as documented in a Twitter Moments[9] roundup that day. Gizmodo[10] called the change a victory for “arse activists.”

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/17/16--13:45: Sticks M Legy Out Really Far
  • About

    Sticks M Legy Out Really Far is a copypasta used on Tumblr to caption images in which the subject appears to be stretching out a single leg.

    Origin

    On August 21st, 2015, Tumblr user apocalypticinsomnia posted a screen capture of the Steven Universe character Sugilite’s leg with the caption “sticks m‘legy out really far” (shown below).



    Spread

    In February 2016, Tumblr[4] user gemdervoid posted an illustration of a kitten sticking out its leg with the copypasta (shown below). Within nine months, the post garnered more than 2,000 notes.



    On June 17th, Redditor SomeonesBirthday submitted a post titled “Origin of ‘Sticks m legy out really far’?” to /r/OutOfTheLoop.[2] On June 24th, Tumblr[6] user blankerflowerbeeds posted a photograph of a bee extending one leg along with the copypasta (shown below).



    On August 12th, Tumblr[3] user sophieswamp posted an illustration of a frog with an outstretched leg captioned with “sticks m legy out real far” (shown below, left). On October 23rd, Tumblr user 7kenx[5] posted an illustration of a dancer with the tag “#stick m legy out real far” (shown below, right). On November 17th, a question asking about the meme was submitted to Meta Filter, to which user larthegreat speculated that it was related to “Razzle Dazzle” image macros.



    Search Interest

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  • 11/18/16--08:55: Hallelujah
  • About

    “Hallelujah” is a popular song written by the late singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen. It has been covered by many artists and grown into a staple of popular culture, with different versions appearing in numerous films and television shows.

    Origin

    “Hallelujah” first appeared on Leonard Cohen’s 1984 album, Various Positions.[1] Cohen wrote 80 draft verses of the track in one writing session.[2] Of the ones that made the final version, several contain biblical references. Cohen would often perform the song live with different verses.



    Spread

    The first cover was recorded by John Cale, who first recorded it for a Leonard Cohen tribute album called I’m Your Fan, released in 1991. Cale’s version (below, left) has lyrics that Cohen only performed live. It also only uses piano as its musical accompaniment, and inspired more somber covers of the song. Cale’s version inspired Jeff Buckley to record what would become one of the most critically acclaimed versions of “Hallelujah” for his 1994 album, Grace (below, right).



    Shrek

    The song gained its widest exposure yet after Cale’s version appeared in the 2001 animated film Shrek. For royalty reasons, a version by Rufus Wainwright appeared on the film’s official soundtrack. According to Alan Light, author of The Holy or the Broken: Leonard Cohen, Jeff Buckley, and the Unlikely Ascent of “Hallelujah”, the song’s use in the film sparked its popularity in pop culture, as “six-year-old kids were suddenly singing ‘Hallelujah,’ and adults came to know it as the song from Shrek.”[3]



    In the following years, “Hallelujah” rapidly became a beloved and popular song choice for emotional scenes in film and television. Versions appeared in The O.C., Scrubs, The West Wing, House, and many more. It has been covered by Regina Spektor, K.D. Lang, Imogen Heap, Justin Timberlake, Bon Jovi, The X Factor‘s Alexandra Burke, and more. It’s popularity led Cohen to agree with a New York Times critic who asked for a “moratorium” on the song’s use in popular culture.

    Saturday Night Live

    On the Saturday Night Live following the 2016 United States Presidential Election and Leonard Cohen’s death at the age of 82,[4] Kate McKinnon, dressed as Hillary Clinton, covered the song in the show’s cold-open.



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  • 11/18/16--10:46: ET Cinnamon Roll
  • About

    ET Cinnamon Roll is a photoshop meme based on a photograph of a cinnamon roll that resembles the face of the titular character from the 1982 American science fiction fantasy film Extraterrestrial (E.T.). Upon surfacing on Reddit in mid-November 2016, the image quickly went viral and spawned dozens of photoshopped parodies.

    Origin

    The original image of the cinnamon roll was submitted by Redditor cheflp1221 in a /r/mildlyinteresting[1] post titled “This cinnamon roll looks like an anguished ET” (shown below). Within the first 48 hours, the post[2] garnered more than 6,500 points, as well as over a dozen of photoshopped parodies in the comments section.



    Spread

    Shortly after the image of the cinnamon roll began circulating online[3], Redditor KevinisMackin started a /r/photoshopbattles[4] thread with the image of the cinnamon roll, which soon led to nearly three dozens of photoshopped parodies in the comments section. Later that afternoon, Twitter user ‏@scheffyy[5] tweeted the photo with the caption “why my cinnamon role look like ET bus a nut,” accruing over 123,500 retweets and 320,100 likes.

    Examples




    Search Interest

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