Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

older | 1 | .... | 301 | 302 | (Page 303) | 304 | 305 | .... | 636 | newer

    0 0
  • 11/04/16--11:51: #SpiritCooking
  • About

    #SpiritCooking is a Twitter hashtag referencing a leaked email hacked from Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta’s account, in which he is invited to a “Spirit Cooking” dinner with performance artist Marina Abramović. After the email was leaked in early November 2016, many speculated that Podesta participated in an occult ritual that may have involved ingesting sperm and breast milk.

    Origin

    On November 3rd, 2016, Wikileaks[4] released Part 28 in their series of leaked emails belonging to Hillary Clinton presidential campaign chairman John Podesta. The leak contained an email from Podesta’s brother Tony, who asked if he would be in New York City on July 9th, 2015 to attend a “Spirt Cooking” dinner hosted by Abramović (shown below).[5]



    Spread

    On November 4th, the political news site We Are Change[1] published an article titled “Spirit Cooking: The Most Disturbing Podesta Email,” which highlighted a video in which Abramovic is seen painting a recipe for “spirit cooking” with “what appears to be thickly congealed blood” on several walls (shown below).



    “Mix fresh breast milk with fresh sperm, drink on earthquake nights. With a sharp knife, cut deeply into the middle finger of your left hand. Eat the pain. Fresh morning urine sprinkle over nightmare dreams. Spin around until you lose consciousness, try to eat all the questions of the day.”

    Shortly after, the @Wikileaks[3] Twitter account tweeted a link to the article, which gathered upwards of 9,000 retweets and 7,400 likes within 12 hours (shown below).



    That day, the hashtag “#SpiritCooking”[11] began trending worldwide on the social networking site, with many of the tweets accusing Podesta and the Clinton campaign of occultism (shown below).



    Also on November 4th, Twitter user @leyawn[2] posted a photoshopped email screenshot in which Abramović sends Podesta a pentagram symbol (shown below).



    Meanwhile, a post titled “Spirit Cooking is the Nail in the Coffin” was submitted to the /pol/ (politically incorrect) board on 4chan,[6] speculating that Clinton would lose support from Christian voters in the upcoming election due to the leaked email.



    The same day, YouTuber Paul Joseph Watson uploaded a video titled “Hillary Tied to Bizarre Occult ‘Spirit Cooking’ Ritual” (shown below). That evening, Snopes[12] published an article titled “Spirit Cooking,” listing the rumor that Clinon and Podesta practice a “satanic ritual” as “False.” In the coming days, several news sites published articles about the leaked email, including The Washington Times,[7]InfoWars,[8]CNET[9] and Inquisitr.[10]



    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References


    0 0
  • 11/04/16--12:20: Life Comes At You Fast
  • About

    Life Comes At You Fast is a phrase popularly used on Twitter to caption unfortunate events either written or illustrated in photos and gifs.

    Origin

    The phrase “Life Comes At You Fast” was popularized in 2004 by American insurance company Nationwide when they launched the “life comes at you fast” ad campaign.[1] The campaign humorously demonstrated how quickly things could go wrong in life to demonstrate why their insurance was necessary.



    Spread

    The joke began appearing on Twitter around 2013. One of the earliest known examples was posted by @MyNig[2] on October 3rd, 2013.



    In the coming two years, “Life Comes At You Fast” became a popular caption to graphics and stories on Twitter,[3] particularly in reference to politics and sports. A Complex[4] article referenced the phrase talking about rapper Tyga. Deadspin[5] did as well in an article linking to a tweet about basketball player Hasheem Thabeet.



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 11/04/16--23:32: Pokémon VGC
  • Pokémon Video Game Championship (shorten to VGC by the Pokémon fanbase) AKA Pokémon World Championships is the official competitive battle format. It is usually held in August by Play! Pokémon, which is formed by The Pokémon Intentional Company.

    The differences between the battle format that Smogon used is the battle format is in Doubles rather than Single, thus making the battle more fast-paced. In addition, the player can only bring four Pokémon out of six Pokémon to the battlefield. Item Clause is in effect as well, meaning that more than two Pokémon in the team cannot hold the same item. And Mythical Pokémon aren’t allowed in any VGC format.

    History:

    The first ever World Championship event was run by Wizards of the Coast, a division of Hasbro, on August 2002 in Seattle, WA, it focuses solely on the trading card game. Eventually, Wizards transfers the right of the trading card game to Nintnedo.

    Nintendo resumed the World Championship in 2004. However, the first four World Championships held by Nintnedo still focus on trading card games, it wasn’t until 2009 where they introduced the Video Game Championship format. Each VGC format comes with their own unique rule.

    Generation V banned the moves Dark Void and Sky Drop, the latter have to do with a particular glitch, though these bans were eventually lifted in Generation VI. From VGC14 and on, it introduced the blue pentagon rule, a Pokémon must be native to X and Y (later Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire) in order to participate the tournament, otherwise it can’t. VGC16 allows normally restricted legendary Pokémon to participate, but no more than two can be allowed.

    Reception:

    The video game format is very popular among the competitive Pokémon playerbase.

    Despite this, numerous fans have criticized VGC for the lack of variety, VGC15 is a notorious case of it as most teams consist of Cresselia, Heatran, Amooguss Landorus-Therian, and Mega Kangaskhan (shorten to CHALK). VGC16 has also been initially criticized for it as well, this time, most teams consist of Groudon, Kyogre, Xerneas, Talonflame and Smeargle

    Another aspect that VGC has been criticized for is slipping hacked Pokémon. People have noticed that Ray Rizzio used an Aegislash with a Dream Ball, which is impossible for a Pokémon introduced in Generation VI to be in it. Despite Ray’s claim, there are evidence that he actually hacked it.

    h2.Impact

    A website by the name of Nugget Bridge focus heavily on VGC. In addition, Smogon has provided several Pokémon analysis for the VGC format.

    Related Meme:

    Pachirisu

    As the blue pentagon rule only allows Articuno, Zapdos and Moltres, Zapdos is commonly used because it’s the only legendary Pokémon that isn’t extremely weak to Rock-type as well as being the fastest of the trio.

    Se Jun Park, a Korean player, has a Pachirisu in his team, a Pokémon that isn’t commonly used in competitive battles. Pachirisu has a particular move called Follow Me, which redirects any attacks. It happens to have its hidden ability, Volt Absorb, allowing it to recover health from Electric-type moves instead. Other arsenal includes Super Fang, a move which cuts the HP of the target by half and Nuzzle, a weak Electric-type attack that always paralyzes the target. Pachirisu holds Sitrus Berry, allowing it to heal 25% of its max HP if it HP reaches less than 50%.

    Many were surprised that how long Pachirisu has stayed in the battlefield than they expected. Eventually, Se Jun Park won the Master Division of VGC on August 17th, 2014. Because of that darkhorse victory, several fanarts, news articles, and memes have spawned for this particular electric squirrel.

    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 11/05/16--12:07: Sombra
  • Hacking in progress



    About

    Sombra is a playable character from the team-based first person shooter video game Overwatch. Being officially announced on early November 2016 after a 4 month long alternate reality game (ARG), the character has become subject of several jokes withn the Overwatch fandom, along with the presence of an intense hype surrounding the character release.

    Background

    In the Overwatch universe, Sombra is a reowned hacker from Mexican descent. After losing his parents due the Omnic War, she started collecting information and selling it to local gangs, until she was detected and forced to remove all his past identity, and joining the terrorist organitzation Talon shortly after it. In the game, she’s a stealth-offense hero who can hack her opponents, allowing her to disable several of their abilities, and becoming invisible to sneak through the enemies.



    Online Relevance

    ARG



    Blizzcon Annoncement



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 11/05/16--16:12: Mannequin Challenge
  • About

    The Mannequin Challenge is a participatory video fad in which a group of people are shown posing stock-still for the camera while music is playing in the background.

    Origin

    On October 26th, 2016, Twitter user @pvrity__[1] uploaded the earliest known viral instance of the participatory video fad, which shows a group of students from Edward H. White High School in Jacksonville, Florida pretending to be lifeless mannequins in a panning shot. In the following week, @pvrity__’s tweet garnered more than 4,400 retweets and 4,100 likes, while the video itself began circulating beyond Twitter, racking up several hundreds of thousands views in aggregate.

    Spread

    By November 2nd, the hashtag challenge had evolved into a full-fledged social media trend among high school and college students, spawning dozens of similar “living portrait”-style videos set to American hip hop duo Rae Sremmurd’s 2016 rap single “Black Beatles.” On November 3rd, Rae Sremmurd made their own contribution to the meme by participating in the challenge on stage during their live concert in Denver, Colorado. Uploaded to their official Twitter account on the next day, the video accumulated more than 47,000 retweets and 61,000 likes within the first 24 hours. On November 4th, the video fad was covered by a number of major sports news sites and blogs, including Deadspin, SBNation and USA Today, along with compilations of the challenge staged by various high school and collegiate sports teams.

    Various Examples

    [researching]

    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 11/07/16--10:17: #DrunkHillary
  • About

    #DrunkHillary is a hashtag used by supporters of 2016 United States Presidential Election Republican nominee Donald Trump to spread the idea that Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton is an alcoholic.

    Origin

    On August 8th, 2015, John Podesta sent an email[1] within the Clinton campaign suggesting someone call Clinton and “sober her up.” On October 27th, 2016, The National Enquirer[2] cited the email as possible proof of a 2014 report they published that Clinton had a problem with alcohol.

    Spread

    That day, Drudge Report devoted its front page to a montage of photographs of Clinton drinking.



    The rumor spread throughout the next few days. On October 31st, Sean Hannity[5] pointed to a Snapchat video of Clinton dancing in July and suggested she was inebriated. The “#DrunkHillary” hashtag took off the same day, when Dilbert creator Scott Adams used it in a tweet[3] arguing that Hillary was too much of a drinker to be trusted with the nuclear codes. On November 3rd, The Washington Post[4] investigated the causes of the hashtag and concluded that once the rumor that Clinton lacked the physical stamina necessary to be president died down, Trump supporters grasped for a similar rumor.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 11/07/16--11:59: Cheating Penguin Video
  • About

    The Cheating Penguin Video is a video of a fight between two penguins that gained widespread internet attention and inspired jokes in the fall of 2016.

    Origin

    On November 4th, 2016, National Geographic tweeted[1] a video titled “HOMEWRECKINGPENGUIN,” in which a penguin discovers his female mate mating with another male. A bloody fight then breaks out between the two male penguins as they fight for the female’s affection. The tweet of the video has gained over 247,000 retweets and 302,000 likes as of November 7th, 2016.



    Spread

    The video began spreading on Black Twitter, as posters began making jokes about the female penguin’s “infidelity” using memes such as Arthur’s Fist and Crying Jordan. Buzzfeed[2] published a compilation of the first tweeted reactions the next day, gaining over 550,000 views in two days. A Reddit OutofTheLoop[3] thread asking about the influx of penguin-related content appeared the same day and gained 45 points. The spread of jokes surrounding the cheating penguins on Twitter drew media attention from National Geographic,[4]USA Today,[5] Complex,[6] and many more.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 11/07/16--13:24: Votecastr
  • About

    Votecastr[7] is a single-serving site designed to give Americans election results in real time throughout the 2016 United States Presidential Election day. It is a cause of concern and controversy because it upends a tradition in media to not disclose election day results until polls close, which news organizations have done to not potentially bias voters.

    History

    Votecastr is a private company from Ken Smukler, Sasha Issenburg, and Trevor Cornwell.[1] Described as a group of “data-scientists, journalists, and Silicon Valley entrepreneurs” by The New York Times,[2] the group first gained media attention on September 10th, 2016 when they were profiled by the Times. The group, which will have their information broadcast on Slate[4] and Vice,[5] is releasing information that is available to campaigns on election day. A New York Times[3] piece published the day before the election illustrated how the information made President Obama’s team nervous during the 2012 election. The New York Daily News[6] published an article in which they expressed fear that such information might depress voter turnout if they have it in real time.

    Online Presence

    As of November 7th, 2016, Votecastr has a limited social presence, with only 2,000 followers on Twitter.[8]

    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 11/09/16--08:35: #TrumpCake
  • About

    #TrumpCake is a hashtag used to make jokes about a cake made in the likeness of Donald Trump delivered to his campaign headquarters in New York on the eve of the 2016 United States Presidential Election.

    Origin

    On the night of the election, Jason Volack of ABC tweeted[1] a picture of a cake with the likeness of Donald Trump being wheeled into Trump Tower. The tweet gained over 3,200 retweets and 4,000 likes.



    Spread

    Soon after the photo first appeared on Twitter, users began sharing photoshops of the cake, inserting it into famous scenes from films.[2] The spread of the photoshops was covered by The Verge,[3] Telegraph,[4] Hollywood Reporter,[5] and more.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 11/09/16--12:18: Sega Genesis
  • About

    Sega Genesis is a 16-bit video game console originally released in the late 1980s by Sega Enterprises, which is widely known for popularizing the Sonic the Hedgehog series. In 2016, the Brazilian toy manufacturer Tectoy began selling a licensed replica of the Sega Genesis system.

    History

    In the early 1980s, Sega Enterprises succeeded as a top arcade game manufacturer in the United States. In 1983, Sega released the SG-1000 home video game console, which was subsequently replaced by the Sega Master System in 1985. In 1988, the Sega Mega Drive was released in Japan. The following year, the same console was released in North American, renamed Sega Genesis.

    Sonic the Hedgehog

    On June 23rd, 1991, the 2D platform game Sonic the Hedgehog[5] was released on the Sega Genesis[6] video game console, in which the character assumes the role of the title character Sonic who runs through various levels to defeat the villain Dr. Robotnik (shown below).



    2016 Re-release

    In November 2016, the Brazilian toy manufacturer Tectoy[1] began taking pre-orders for a special edition replica of the Sega Genesis for $125 USD, which would come with a cartridge slot and an SD card preloaded with 22 games. As part of the initial shipments, the company announced they would not be taking international orders. In the coming days, several news sites published articles about the re-release, including Geek,[2] The Daily What[3] and CNET.[4] On November 8th, YouTuber ReviewTechUSA released a video about the Sega Genesis replica (shown below).



    Online Presence

    On October 26th, 2009, the /r/SEGA[5] subreddit was launched for discussions about the various Sega consoles. On December 8th, 2010, the /r/SegaGenesis subreddit was created for discussions about the Sega Genesis console specifically. On December 6th, 2012, the /r/Megadrive[7] subreddit was launched as part of the Retro Gaming network on Reddit. On December 7th, 2013, YouTuber WatchMojo.com posted a video ranking the “Top 10 Sega Genesis Games” (shown below, left). On August 23rd, 2014, YouTuber Tom Long uploaded a montage of Sega Genesis commercials from the early 1990s (shown below, right).



    On February 17th, 2015, The Game Theorists YouTube channel uploaded a video comparing the Sega Genesis to the Super Nintendo (shown below, left). On April 11th, the DidYouKnowGaming? channel posted a video about the history of the Sega Genesis (shown below, right). On the website Emulator.online,[8] several Sega Genesis titles are available to be played using an embedded emulator within a web browser.



    Related Memes

    Michael Jackson Sprite

    The Michael Jackson Sprite is the 16-bit 2D character modeled after the late entertainer Michael Jackson from the Sega Genesis game Moonwalker (shown below).



    Outrun

    Outrun is a 1980s-themed retrofuturistic visual art and music style associated with the electronic genres electro, synthwave, futuresynth, new retrowave and vaporwave. The style is named after the iconic 1986 arcade racing game Out Run, which was popularized with a release for the Sega Genesis console.

    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0

    Mandarin Chinese Textbook for Beginners
    Open the Door to Chinese Book 1 by Polina Shinkina
    http://www.lulu.com/content/e-book/open-the-door-to-chinese-book-1/18834317
    http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/polina985


    0 0
  • 11/10/16--07:53: Drain the Swamp
  • About

    “Drain the Swamp” refers to draining the water out of a marsh in order to exterminate a population of mosquitoes spreading malaria, which is often used metaphorically in political contexts when promising the removal of undesirable elements from government.

    Origin

    According to etymologist Barry Popik,[10]“drain the swamp” was originally used metaphorically in 1903 by Social Democratic Party organizer Winfield R. Gaylord in a letter discussing how socialists wish to deal with big business:

    “Socialists are not satisfied with killing a few of the mosquitoes which come from the capittalist [sic] swamp; they want to drain the swamp.”

    Spread

    In 1983, the 40th President of the United States Ronald Reagan revealed that “draining the swamp” of big government would be a primary focus of his administration. Immediately after the September 11th, 2001 attacks, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld pleged to “drain the swamp” where terrorists reside.[5] In 2006, Democratic congresswoman Nancy Pelosi announced she would “drain the swamp” after being elected Speaker of the House of Representatives following 10 years of Republican control of Congress.[4] On August 1st, 2010, Urban Dictionary[2] user vanderpol submitted a definition for “drain the swamp,” defining its figurative use as “to exterminate something that is harmful,” noting that the term “is especially attractive for politicians.”



    On October 23rd, 2015, Republican presisdential candidate Ben Carson released a campaign ad titled “Drain the Swamp,” calling for voters to elect him to clean up the United States government (shown below, left). On October 17th, Trump delivered a speech outlining his plan to “drain the swamp” in Washington, D.C., noting that he planned to place new regulations preventing executive branch officials and Congress from lobbying after they leave office (shown below, right).



    On October 18th, Trump tweeted that he will “make our government honest again,” along with the hashtag “#DrainTheSwamp” (shown below).[3] Within one month the tweet gathered upwards of 28,000 likes and 13,000 retweets.



    On October 23rd, political cartoonist Ben Garrison released an illustration titled “Drain the Swamp,” in which Trump is shown pulling the plug on a drain to suck down Hillary and Bill Clinton, Paul Ryan and John Podesta along with the words “corruption,” “war” and “crime” (shown below). That day, the cartoon reached the front page of the /r/the_donald[7] subreddit.



    On October 20th, 2016, Redditor the-realDonaldTrump submitted a post titled “Drain the Swamp” about the upcoming final presidential debate. Over the next month, the post received more than 13,000 votes (61% upvoted) and 17,000 comments on /r/the_donald.[1] On October 26th, the women’s interest site Bustle[8] published an article titled “What Does ’Drain the Swamp; Mean?”, noting that Trump enthusiasts were using the hashtag in the context of purging media professionals. The same day, the news site Slate[11] published an article about the history of the expression in politics.

    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 11/10/16--09:37: Moving to Canada
  • About

    Moving to Canada is an idea often suggested by liberal American citizens in the wake of conservative victories in American government. Canada has more liberal institutions than the United States with regards to health care and LGBT laws.

    Origin

    As The Star[1] puts it, “As long as there has been America, there have been Americans moving to Canada,” citing how colonial loyalists fled to Canada after the Revolutionary War. It also cites how African Americans fled to Canada during the times of American slavery, Prarie pioneers went to Canada looking to settle its western territories, and draft dodgers who fled to Canada to escape fighting in the Vietnam war. The peak of American emigration to Canada came in 1974, when 27,932 Americans crossed the border.

    Spread

    Online, American emigration to Canada first had a swell after the 2004 Presidential Election, when George W. Bush defeated John Kerry. According to The Star,[2] the amount of hits on Canada’s immigration website was six times the normal amount the day following the election. In 2006, immigration to Canada reached a 30 year high. The popularity of the phrase led it to appear on popular satirical blog Stuff White People Like[3] in 2008. They described the phrase thusly:

    “It shows that (white people’s) dedication to their lifestyle and beliefs are so strong, that they would consider packing up their entire lives and moving to a country that is only slightly different to the one they live in now.

    2016 Presidential Election

    The phrase “move to Canada” spiked on Google trends[4] following Donald Trump’s victories on March 1st, 2016 (aka “Super Tuesday”) during the 2016 Republican Presidential Primary. Soon after, The Daily Dot,[5] Huffington Post,[6] Time,[7] and more published guides of how to move to Canada. The topic continued to be prevalent in the lead-up to election day, and featured a similar spike in media articles following Trump’s victory on November 8th, 2016. The night of the election, the Canadian immigration site crashed as it was flooded with visits.[8] In a monologue the night after the election, Stephen Colbert urged Americans to quit the "move to Canada rhetoric because “America is a family.”



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 11/10/16--10:46: Shadilay
  • About

    “Shadilay” is a 1986 disco song by the Italian band P.E.P.E., which features an illustration of a green frog holding a magic wand in the album artwork for the single. After it was discovered by users on 4chan’s /pol/ board in September 2016, many hailed the song as proof of meme magic and the Prophecy of Kek due to the band’s name and frog illustration bearing similarities to Pepe the Frog.

    Origin

    In 1986, the music label Magic Sound released the single “Shadilay” by the band P.E.P.E. On November 17th, 2009, YouTuber Sinjanin Satirc uploaded the recording to YouTube (shown below, left). On September 13th, 2016, YouTuber breakintheline reposted the song under the title “/pol/ exclusive – P.E.P.E.- Shadilay” (shown below, right).



    Spread

    The following day, DJ Magaman uploaded a remix of the track to Soundcloud[1] (shown below).



    On September 15th, an article titled “The Truth About Pepe the Frog and the Cult of Kek” was released on Wordpress,[3] which described the song as “Kek/Pepe’s musical anthem.” The same day, YouTuber Soundae posted a vaporwave remix of “Shadilay” (shown below, left). On September 16th, YouTuber Succpapi uploaded another remix of the song playing in the background of an illustration of Donald Trump with animations of Pepe the Frog dancing in front of the words “Praise Kek!” (shown below, right).



    On October 19th, 2016, Urban Dictionary user kekmugwort submitted an entry for “shadilay,” defining it as a term used by followers of Kek to “praise the dark lord” (shown below).



    On November 9th, following the election of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States, a 4chan user submitted a post containing the song’s lyrics to the /pol/ board (shown below).



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 11/10/16--13:58: Brexit Toblerone
  • Overview

    Brexit Toblerone refers to an online backlash to the updated form of reduced-weight Toblerone chocolate bars, which some speculated were the result of surges in chocolate ingredient prices due to the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union referendum.

    Background

    On October 15th, 2016, the Toblerone Facebook[4] page posted an announcement that they would be reducing the weight of two of their chocolate bars sold in the UK due to “higher costs for numerous ingredients” (shown below). Within one month, the post received more than 1,100 comments 1,000 reaction and 290 shares.



    Developments

    Online Reaction

    On October 29th, 2016, Twitter user Sharon Norman[8] posted a photograph of the new Toblerone shape along with the hashtags “#joke” and “#dissapointing” (shown below, left).[8] On November 8th, Twitter user James Melville[1] tweeted a photograph of the new Toblerone shape, comparing it to a “bicycle stand” and using the hashtag “#WeWantOurTobleroneBack”[6] (shown below, right). Within 48 hours, the tweet gathered upwards of 1,700 likes and 1,100 retweets.



    That day, other Twitter users began expressing disappointment with the chocolate bar’s update form factor, with some speculating it was the result of the Brexit referendum (shown below). Meanwhile, Redditor TOOSG submitted a post about the online reaction to the chocolate bar shape to /r/BritishSuccess,[5] where it received more than 8,300 votes (84% upvoted) and 350 comments in 48 hours.



    Toblerone’s Response

    On November 8th, Toblerone post a message on their official Facebook[2] page, claiming that the rises in the cost of ingredients forced the company to reduce their 400g chocolate bars down to 360g and their 170g bar to 150g. Within 48 hours, the post received more than 2,400 reactions, 1,000 comments and 300 shares.



    That day, the BBC published an article about the new chocolate bars, which included a statement from a spokesperson for the chocolate bar company claimingthe change “wasn’t done as a result of Brexit.” The following day, the company posted a photo to Facebook[3] showing what the new chocolate bar looks like, garnering upwards of 600 reactions and 120 comments over the next 24 hours (shown below).[3]



    News Media Coverage

    In the coming days, several news sites published articles about the online backlash to the chocolate bar shape, including The Telegraph,[9]BBC[7] and The Verge.[10]

    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 11/10/16--15:41: Andy's Coming
  • About

    Andy’s Coming is a challenge from the animated Pixar movie Toy Story.

    Origin

    Spread

    Various Examples

    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0

    About

    Obama and Trump Shaking Hands refers to dozens of photoshops of an image of President Barack Obama and President-elect Donald Trump shaking hands in the Oval Office following Trump’s win in the 2016 United States Presidential Election.

    Origin

    On November 10th, 2016, Donald Trump visited the Oval Office to talk to Barack Obama about foreign and domestic policy. Following their meeting, they met with reporters for a brief conference and photo opportunity. That neither of the men appeared to be happy while they shook hands sparked a series of jokes on Twitter and Reddit. One tweet by @coolmcjazz[2] posted a photo of the meeting with the caption “When you see hatred and racism, stare in it the face. It probably won’t have the courage to look back.” It gained over 73,000 retweets and 126,000 favorites in two days.



    Spread

    One image, shown below, sparked a photoshop battle on Reddit started by discovicke the next morning.[1] The post gained over 6,100 points in less than a day.



    Uproxx[3] covered the popularity of the thread later that morning, including many of the most upvoted photoshops. Bustle[4] posted some of the most popular jokes that appeared on Twitter, as did Teen Vogue.[5]

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 11/11/16--09:59: Keijo!!!!!!!!
  • About

    Keijo!!!!!!!! (競女!!!!!!!! in Japanese) is a Japanese anime and manga series based in an alternate reality where former judo students participate in keijo, a sport in which women in bikinis attempt to knock each other off floating platforms by striking opponents with their breasts and buttocks. Online, the series has drawn criticism by some feminists as a sexist form of “fan service.”

    History

    Manga

    In July 2013, Keijo was serialized in the manga magazine Weekly Shōnen Sunday. Collections of the manga were subsequently released across 13 tankōbon volumes.

    Anime

    On July 30th, 2016, a trailer for an upcoming Keijo anime series was released on YouTube (shown below). On October 6th, the series began airing in Japan and was subsequently released on the anime streaming site Crunchyroll.[2] As of November 2016, a total of seven episodes have been broadcast.



    Dead or Alive Xtreme 3

    Online Presence

    On August 20th, 2015, the Keijo Wiki[4] was created, gathering upwards of 200 pages in the next year. On August 15th, 2016, the /r/keijo[3] subreddit was launched for discussions about the anime series. On October 7th, YouTuber Meti ‘Not The Bad Guy’ uploaded a clip from the Keijo anime titled “The New JoJo Looks Great” (shown below).



    On October 9th, the anime news site Anime Maru published a satirical article titled “’Keijo!!!!!!!!’ Tops Fall Season in Exclamation Points.” On October 20th, 2016, YouTuber Kirin AMV’s uploaded an anime music video featuring the pop song “Bomb” by Isa (shown below).



    Reception

    In November 2016, Crunchyroll announced that Keijo was the most-viewed anime series in nine states within the United States.[5]



    Fan Service Controversy

    On October 11th, 2016, Kotaku[8] published an article criticizing the anime for being objectifying to women. Two days later, Redditor sw4ahl submitted a post mocking the Kotaku article to /r/KotakuInAction,[9] where it gathered upwards of 920 votes (97% upvoted) and 200 comments within one month. That day, Kotaku[10] published an interview with Anime Feminist founder Amelia Cook, who denounced animes like Keijo for using “fan service” to appeal to a male audience.

    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0

    This meme usually consists of 2 characters (one male, one female) standing respectively from left to right, with the male character saying the phrase “Wow queen you’re so beautiful.” The original meme template consists of the characters Max Goof, and Roxanne.

    I couldn’t find the original meme template, someone help.


    0 0

    Overview

    #NotMyPresident is a social media activist movement protesting the election of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States.

    Background

    On November 8th, 2016, the 2016 United States presidential election was held across the 50 states and the District of Columbia. As the election results came in, Trump came out ahead in several key swing states, much to the surprise of forecasts and projections favoring rival Hillary Clinton. As the evening progressed, Trump’s critics began tweeting their disapproval of his candidacy along with the hashtag"#NotMyPresident"[7] (shown below). At 3:00 a.m. (EST) the following morning, Trump emerged victorious by securing 279 of the required 270 electoral votes, leading Clinton to concede the race.



    Developments

    On November 9th, the hashtag #NotMyPresident became the top trending topic on the social networking site. That day, a Facebook[1] event page titled “Trump is Not My President” was created for a march on Union Square, New York City on November 12th. Within 48 hours, the page gathered more than 12,000 responses as “going” and 29,000 as “interested.”



    On November 10th, North Carolina resident Elijah Berg created a petition on Change.org[12] to urge members of the electoral college to go against their state’s vote and cast their ballot for Hillary Clinton. Within 24 hours, the petition gathered upwards of 2.59 million signatures.



    Protests

    On November 10th, Trump tweeted that “professional protesters” who were “incited by the media” were unfairly contesting his election (shown below).[4]



    That evening, Twitter user @itsmikebevins posted a video of anti-Trump protests smashing car windows in Portland, Oregon (shown below). Within 24 hours, the tweet gained over 2,000 retweets and 1,700 likes




    On November 11th, The Daily Mail[8] reported that Black Lives Matter protester and anti-bullying campaigner Shacara McLaurin had been arrested for shoving a 74-year-old man to the ground at a demonstration outside Trump tower in Manhattan, New York. Meanwhile, protests occurred in various other locations across the United States, including Chicago, Illinois and Portland, Oregon, where violent clashes erupted with police.[5][6]



    Grubhub CEO’s Anti-Trump Letter

    On November 10th, Fox News[9] publicized an internal memo sent by Grubhub CEO Matt Maloney, who urged employees to resign if they didn’t agree with his statements condemning Donald Trump. That day, Maloney issued a press release claiming that he “did not ask for anyone to resign if they voted for Trump.”[10] Over the next 24 hours, many called for a boycott of Grubhub on social media, leading to a 5% decrease in the company’s shares.[11]

    Search Interest

    External References


older | 1 | .... | 301 | 302 | (Page 303) | 304 | 305 | .... | 636 | newer