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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 10/31/16--09:12: HealSlut
  • ()

    The phrase “Healslut” or “Heal Slut” is a phrase adopted from the 2007 game Team Fortress 2, as the phrase was to describe “a pocket medic” that heals only one target, usually a bad healer.

    ()
    A Pocket Medic healing a skilled player in the game Team Fortress 2

    The Phrase was later adopted by tumblr users on posts, NSFW or SFW alike, based on the character Mercy from the 2016 game Overwatch, as a joke. The phrase found its way onto the funnyjunk comments all over the website, mostly used when describing Mercy altogether.


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    Overview

    Dakota Access Pipeline Protests refer to ongoing demonstrations against a proposed oil pipeline planned by the natural gas and propane company Energy Transfer Partners to be constructed in the Bakken oil fields in Northwest North Dakota, crossing beneath the Mississippi and Missouri rivers and part of Lake Oahe by the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. Much of the opposition has come from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, who claim that the construction of the pipeline threatens their primary source of drinking water and irrigation.

    Background

    In June 2014, the board of directors for Energy Transfer Partners approved the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. In March and April 2016, the Environment Protection Agency (EPA), the Department of Interior (DOI) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation requested a formal Environment Impact Assessment to be conducted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to determine the potential environmental effects of the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline. In July, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe filed a lawsuit against the Army Corps of Engineers for violating the National Historic Preservation Act by issuing permits to construct the pipeline, noting that the construction could potentially harm their primary source of water.

    Developments

    Demonstrations

    In April, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe elder LaDonna Bravebull Allard established the Sacred Stones camp as a site of resistance to the pipeline. Over the next several months, thousands of people moved to the camp in support of the protests. In August, the group ReZpect our Water ran cross-country from North Dakota to Washington, D.C. to deliver a petition signed by 140,000 people in protest of the pipeline to the Army Corps of Engineers. In September, NBC News published an article on the camp, reporting that 300 Native American tribes were residing in the camp.[7] On September 3rd, the Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier claimed protesters crossed onto private property and attacked security guards. On September 3rd, the Democracy Now! YouTube channel uploaded a news report from the protest site (shown below).



    On September 9th, the EPA, the DOI and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation ordered to halt construction until additional environment impact assessments were made.

    Politicians’ Reactions

    On September 13th, Senator Bernie Sanders called on President Barack Obama to halt the oil pipeline’s construction.[8] On October 25th, former Vice President Al Gore issued a statement showing his support for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.[4]



    Online Reactions

    On Reddit

    Many posts about the pipeline protests have reached the front page of various subreddits, including /r/politics,[11] /r/news[12] and /r/politicalrevolution.[13] On October 28th, 2016, Redditor wherameye posted a photograph of police wearing camouflage at Standing Rock to the /r/pics[3] subreddit (shown below). Within 72 hours, the post gained over 9,600 votes (82% upvoted) and 5,700 comments.



    On Twitter

    During the summer of 2016, Twitter users began posting the hashtag “#NoDAPL”[9] in support of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe (shown below). In August, the @NoDAPL Twitter[10] feed was launched. On October 30th, Twitter user @zhaabowkwe tweeted footage from the protest, claiming that several “Native American youth were maced multiple times” (shown below).




    On Facebook

    On February 24th, 2016, the Standing Rock Dakota Access Pipeline Opposition Facebook[1] page was created, which gathered upwards of 70,700 likes within nine months. On October 27th, Facebook user Atsa E’sha Hoferer began livestreaming the protests (shown below).



    On October 31st, a Facebook status update began circulating claiming that the Morton County Sheriff’s Department was using Facebook as a surveillance tool to “disrupt prayer camps,” calling for all Facebook users to “check in” at the site to confuse law enforcement (shown below).



    That day, over 130,000 Facebook users “checked in” at the Standing Rock Indian Reservation location page.[2] Meanwhile, Snopes[5] published an article about the Facebook status update, listing the claims made about the Morton County Sheriff’s Department as “unproven.”



    Wild Buffalo Sighting

    On October 28th, 2016, Vimeo user videobuzz uploaded footage of protesters cheering at a herd of buffalo (shown below). That day, Snopes[6] published an article about the buffalo sighting video, noting that several inaccurate images of buffalo at the protest site began circulating online.



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/31/16--11:27: Poorly Prepared Polar Bear
  • About

    Poorly Prepared Polar Bear is an advice animal image macro series featuring a picture of a polar bear in a helmet made out of a garbage pail and various captions characterizing the bear as an absent-minded individual. Upon its introduction via 9GAG in late October 2016, the advice animal character spawned a handful of jokes illustrating humorous situations for which the bear is hopelessly unprepared.

    Origin

    The still image of the polar bear comes from a video posted by Mmovies21[1] on August 30th, 2015 that finds a polar bear playing with the bucket on its head. Buzzfeed[2] covered the video on September 24th, 2015.



    On October 29th, 2016, screenshots of the story was tweeted by @RelatableQuote[3] and gained over 8,000 retweets in two days. The following day, 9GAG user stroop_wafel posted it as an Advice Animal with the caption “Brings a Knife To a Gun Fight.”[4] The post gained 22,155 points in one day.



    Spread

    Following stroop_wafel’s post, Poorly Prepared Polar Bear became a popular trend on 9GAG, as users debated the quality of the meme and what it should be called. Many users claimed the meme was forced, [5] while others debated if it should be called “Noob Bear” or “Bearly Prepared Bear.”[6]

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/31/16--12:17: Scarred Stewie
  • Used to often describe emotionally traumatic events and occurrences, can be used to give advice base on ironic and again , unpleasant circumstances.


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    About

    Michael Moore in TrumpLand Speech Remixes refers to edited versions of a monologue delivered by filmmaker Michael Moore in his documentary Michael Moore in TrumpLand, in which he describes how electing Donald Trump as president would be “the biggest fuck you ever recorded in human history.”

    Origin

    On October 18th, 2016, the documentary film Michael Moore in TrumpLand was released in theaters, in which Moore the 2016 United States presidential election during his one-man show at the Murphy Theatre in Wilmington Ohio. On October 24th, YouTuber orlared uploaded audio of Moore discussing Trump in the film, in which he speculates why mid-Western Americans would vote for Donald Trump. At the end of the speech, Moore says that electing Trump would be “the biggest fuck you ever recorded in human history. And it will feel, good” (shown below). The clip ends before Moore claims they will come to regret the decision, comparing it to the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom.



    Spread

    That same day, the video reached the front page of the /r/The_Donald[5] subreddit. Meanwhile, YouTuber itsBarbz uploaded a video featuring the Moore monologue with patriotic music playing in the background as if it were a pro-Trump advertisement (shown below, left). On October 25th, a similar remix was uploaded by YouTuber Marcus Atwood (shown below, right).



    Meanwhile, Milo Yiannopoulos posted the audio clip with the caption “Michael Moore makes the argument for voting Trump” on his official Facebook page,[2] where it received upwards of 10 million views, 157,000 shares and 9,900 comments. On October 26th, Snopes[3] published an article titled “Moore to the Picture,” which labeled claims that Michael Moore had endorsed Trump for president as “false.” That same day, the Studio Krank YouTube channel uploaded slow motion footage of Trump supporters with the Moore speech playing in the background (shown below).



    On October 27th, Donald Trump tweeted a link to YouTuber orlared’s video (shown below).[1] Within four days, the tweet received more than 25,000 likes and 12,000 retweets.



    That day, Moore posted the full version of the ending to the speech, where he adds additional commentary about Trump’s election.



    “Trump’s election is going to be the biggest ‘fuck you’ ever recorded in human history. And it will feel good, for a day. Maybe a week. Possibly a month. And then. Like the Brits, who wanted to send a message, so they voted to leave Europe only to find out that if you vote to leave Europe you, actually have to leave Europe. And now they regret it. All the Ohioans, Pennsylvanians, Michiganders and Wisconsinites of Middle England, right, they all voted to leave and now they regret it.”

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Twitter – @realDonaldTrump

    [2]Facebook – Milo Yiannopoulos

    [3]Snopes – “Moore to the Picture”: Michael Moore has endorsed Donald Trump for president.

    [4]Twitter – MMFlint

    [5]Reddit – /r/The_Donald


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  • 10/31/16--13:11: The Warriors Blew a 3-1 Lead
  • About

    The Warriors Blew a 3-1 Lead refers to a series of jokes about how the NBA’s Golden State Warriors lost the 2016 NBA Finals to the Cleveland Cavaliers after having three wins against Cleveland’s one in the Best-of-Seven series. That season, Golden State set the record for wins in the regular season with 73, and had the league’s first-ever unanimous Most Valuable Player in Steph Curry. Despite needing only one more victory to win the championship, Golden State lost the following three games and the series. This made them the first team in NBA History to blow a 3-1 series lead in the NBA finals. The jokes are a way to troll Warriors supporters who claimed the team was the best in NBA history.

    Origin

    In June of 2016, the Golden State Warriors met the Cleveland Cavaliers in the NBA Finals. After winning three of the first four games in the series, Golden State lost the following three games and the championship.



    Following The Warriors Game 7 loss on June 19th, “The Warriors Blew a 3-1 Lead” became a popular punchline on Twitter to mock Warriors fans. One of the earlier recorded instances of the joke came on June 29th, when Twitter user @MrJayGomez[1] joked that Brexit was a way to distract the public from remembering the Warriors blew a 3-1 lead.

    Spread

    The jokes continued throughout the summer of 2016 during the NBA offseason. On August 30th, Jacob Rosen created a Storify list[2] in which he compiled dozens of tweets featuring “The Warriors Blew a 3-1 Lead” jokes. On September 13th, Ohio sports blog Waiting For Next Year[3] did the same. Some tweets had a conspiracy theory-esque style to them; for example, user @SportsTalkJoe[4] tweeted:



    The joke soon began appearing in relation to stories that sometimes had nothing to do with basketball. For example, on October 9th, during Fox News’ coverage of the second 2016 United States Presidential Election Debate, a sign was seen behind a Fox News pundit reminding viewers how the Warriors Blew a 3-1 lead (shown below). It has also been used in relation to football quarterback Robert Griffin III’s injury, the Olympics, and Frank Ocean. A user on Etsy[5] sells wristbands with the phrase written on them.



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/01/16--09:48: Obi-Wan Kenboni
  • About

    Obi-wan Kenboni refers to a series of photoshops of Ken Bone dressed as Obi-wan Kenobi from Star Wars for Halloween, 2016.

    Origin

    On October 31st, 2016, Ken Bone, who became an internet sensation following his question at the second 2016 United States Presidential Election Debate, posted a picture of himself dressed as the character Obi-wan Kenobi from Star Wars to his Twitter account.[1] In less than 24 hours, the tweet, shown below, gained 13,000 retweets and 29,000 favorites.



    Spread

    Shortly after Bone’s post, Reddit user ErnestJ submitted the picture to /r/photoshopbattles[2] in a post that gained over 4,300 points in less than a day, sparking a series of photoshops featuring Ken Bone as Obi-Wan Kenobi in different scenarios. As of November 1st, 2016, the most popular photoshop was submitted by anonymous_utah. The image, shown below, features Bone in a Star Wars-esque movie poster, surrounded by Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, FBI Director James Comey, and Bernie Sanders. It has nearly 3,600 points.



    Other popular posts put Obi-Wan Kenboni on different types of Star Wars posters, trading cards, and into scenes from the original trilogy. Mashable[3] covered the photoshop battle that day.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References


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  • 11/01/16--10:42: BuzzFeed Tasty
  • About

    BuzzFeed Tasty is a series of short food recipe videos produced and distributed by BuzzFeed. Each video shows a meal being prepared and cooked from start to finish, along with a step-by-step instruction, from the top-down view. Since its launch in 2015, the series has gained a large following on the social media, particularly on Facebook, due to its simple and visually to-the-point style of recipe videos.

    History

    On July 31st, 2015, the Tasty Facebook[3] page was launched. On September 23rd, the BuzzFeedTasty Instagram[7] feed was launched, highlighting many of the recipe videos alongside food porn photographs. On January 22nd, 2016, the Tasty YouTube[8] channel was launched. Within 10 months, it received more than 182 million video views and 1.5 million subscribers. As of November 2016, the most-viewed video demonstrates how to make “cookies & cream puffs” (shown below).



    Proper Tasty

    On December 15th, 2015, BuzzFeed launched the “Proper Tasty” Facebook page, featuring recipe videos for making British comfort food. Over the next 11 months, the page accumulated over 13 million likes.



    Traffic

    Within 15 months of creation, Tasty released 2,000 recipe videos and gained over 73 million likes on Facebook. According to the analytics company Tubular Labs,[1] Tasty videos gathered upwards of 1.8 billion views during September 2016, with 1.6 billion coming from Facebook alone.

    Parodies

    On October 27th, 2015, the Nasty Recipes YouTube channel was launched as a parody of the Tasty channel (shown below).



    On February 23rd, 2016, the recipe video Facebook page Yum Feed[6] was launched, highlighting parody recipe videos shot in the same style as BuzzFeed Tasty (shown below).



    On March 13th, Funny Or Die released a parody recipe video titled “How to Make Milk” (shown below, left). On March 16th, 2016, Clickhole[4] released a parody video titled “Easy Recipe For Warm Egg Near Blue Square You Can Make In Just 4 Months!” (shown below, right).



    Geico Commercials

    In late October 2016, Geico released several commercials parodying the Tasty videos, in which a raccoon creates food dishes from garbage (shown below).



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/01/16--12:54: #SavePepe Campaign
  • Overview

    The #SavePepe Campaign is an internet activism campaign to reclaim Matt Furie’s cartoon character Pepe the Frog from alt-right posters who began using Pepe as an anti-semitic and white supremacist meme in an event known as the Nazi Pepe Controversy.

    Background

    In the summer of 2016, members of 4chan began spreading anti-semitic and white nationalist memes, culminating on September 10th, when Donald Trump Jr. posted a picture of himself, Pepe, and several top conservatives in a poster for a film called “The Deplorables,” a reference to Hillary Clinton’s comment that supporters of Donald Trump were a basket of deplorables.



    In the following months, several news media outlets wondered about the significance of Pepe’s supposed turn to racism. On September 26th, the Anti-Defamation League added Pepe to the list of recognized hate symbols.

    On October 14th, the Anti-Defamation League[1] announced that it would join forces with Matt Furie on the #SavePepe hashtag campaign in an effort to reclaim Pepe the Frog from racists by creating and sharing positive images of the frog.



    Spread

    The Independent described the effort as a “campaign to free [the] meme from Donald Trump supporters”.[2]

    On October 17th, The Nib[3], the political cartoon site that previously commissioned K.C. Green’s response to the Republican National Committee’s use of his “This Is Fine” webcomic, released an original drawing by Matt Furie that shows Pepe the Frog melting into a likeness of Donald Trump.

    That same day, TIME Magazine published an op-ed article by Furie in which he further rebuked the alt-right’s use of his art.[4]

    “As the creator of Pepe, I condemn the illegal and repulsive appropriations of the character by racist and fringe groups. The true nature of Pepe, as featured in my comic book, ‘Boys Club,’ celebrates peace, togetherness and fun. I aim to reclaim the rascally frog from the forces of hate and ask that you join me in making millions of new, joyful Pepe memes that share the light hearted spirit of the original chilled-out champion.”

    Over the following month, artists and supporters tweeted using the #SavePepe hashtag to show support for Pepe’s less politicized origins.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/01/16--18:24: Bobley
  • Mr. Bobley is an uncommon meme to represent how much of a failure a person can be, Bobley is commonly known for messing things up or being really, really stupid, doing stupid things. It started on the Steam Store, Steam being a platform for gamers on the PC platform. The game, ‘The Adventures Of Mr. Bobley’ was a major flop of a game and many users on the site has used him as a ‘dumbass’ for looking like a bob the builder copy cat.


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  • 11/02/16--01:32: Bempo
  • Bempo is an impressionable, normie, social justice warrior. By default he’s a bald, clean shaven, white male (probably college) student, but he has a tendency to change colors, hair styles, accessories and/or gender to fit in at school. He aspires to get a degree in social studies or social justice so he can spread social justice to the next generation.


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  • 11/02/16--11:40: Donald Trump's Small Hands
  • About

    Donald Trump’s Small Hands refers to a series of jokes referring to the supposedly smaller-than-average hand size of 2016 Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump.

    Origin

    In 1988, Graydon Carter, writing for Spy Magazine, referred to Trump as a “Short-fingered vulgarian” as a way to get under Trump’s skin.[1]

    Spread

    Carter recalled the jab in a Vanity Fair editorial published November, 2015, which re-introduced the idea that Trump has small hands to a national audience. According to Carter, the jab did in fact get under Trump’s skin, as Carter reports occasionally receiving an envelope from Trump with a picture of himself torn from a magazine in which his fingers are circled with the comment “Not so short!” On February 1st, 2016, Mother Jones[2] published a playful article that investigated what Trump’s finger-size would mean for his presidency. Vanity Fair[3] published a list of photographs in which Trump’s hands look small a few weeks later.

    Trump’s small hands became a talking point during the 2016 Presidential Republican Primary when Marco Rubio lashed back at Trump’s insult for him, Little Marco. At a campaign rally on February 29th, 2016, Rubio said that though Trump is 6’2", he doesn’t understand why Trump has hands the size of someone who is 5’2". He went on to possibly suggest Trump has a small penis, saying “You know what they say about guys with tiny hands,” pausing before he clarified, “You can’t trust them!”



    At the next Republican Primary Debate on March 3rd in Detroit, Trump responded to Rubio’s quip by assuring Americans his penis was of an unproblematic size, saying “I guarantee you, there’s no problem.”[4]

    The national discussion of Trump’s hands inspired a series of jokes and photoshops about Trump’s tiny hands. On June 17th, NPR[5] reported on a small Super PAC, Americans Against Insecure Billionaires With Tiny Hands, devoted to making fun of Trump’s hands that had filed on March 3rd. On August 3rd, Hollywood Reporter[6] discovered via a handprint of Trump’s cast in bronze at Madame Tussauds Wax Museum that Trump’s hands were in fact smaller than 85% of American men. On August 4th, DailyKos[7] published an article with list of Trump’s hands memes created by the author. The Atlantic,[8] Huffington Post,[9] and Washington Post[10] are among some of the major media outlets that have covered Trump’s hand size.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/02/16--12:01: AmourShipping
  • About

    Amourshipping refers to the romantic pairing of the characters Ash Ketchum and Serena from the animated Pokémon television shows Pokémon the Series: XY and Pokémon the Series: XY&Z.

    Origin

    On September 12th, 2013, a discussion thread for shipping Ash Ketchum and Serena was created on the Serebii Forums,[10] which collected fanarts, fanfiction and other media related to the romantic pairing.

    Spread

    In September 2014, the Amourshipping Blog[6] was launched on Tumblr, featuring screen captured images and fan arts of Ash Ketchum and Serena. On April 28th, 2015, the Ash + Serena = Amourshipping Couple Facebook[2] page was launched, accumulating upwards of 69,600 likes in two years. On August 11th, YouTuber YouYou PikaChU uploaded an anime music video montage titled "Ash X Serena Kiss – Amourshipping (shown below, left). On May 15th, YouTuber Aros uploaded a similar music video, featuring scenes of the Pokemon characters with a remix of the 2013 pop rock song “Counting Stars” by OneRepublic playing in the background (shown below, right). Over the next 15 months, the videos gained over 4.9 million and 1.5 million views respectively.



    On May 21st, YouTuber 64man100 uploaded a slideshow of amourshipping fan arts (shown below, left). On November 15th, a page for AmourShipping was created on the Pokemon Shipping Wiki.[1] On November 24th, YouTuber ChrisBased97 uploaded a montage of clips from the Pokemon animated series titled “Amourshipping Moments Part 1” (shown below, right). Over the next year, the video received more than 2.2 million views respectively.



    Kissing Scene

    On October 27th, 2016, the final episode of Pokémon: XY&Z was broadcast, in which Serena runs up an escalator to say goodbye to Ketchum at the end of the show (shown below). When the scene cuts to a shot of the two character’s feet, many speculated that Serena kisses Ash.



    Following the episode, many GIFs and image macros of the scene were posted on Tumblr (shown below).[7][8][9]



    Various Examples

    As of November 2016, there are more than 31,800 search results on Instagram[4] and 2,900 on DeviantArt[5] under the tag #amourshipping.



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Wikia – Pokemon Shipping Wiki

    [2]Facebook – AmourshippingCouple

    [3]Twitter – #amourshipping

    [4]Instagram – #amourshipping

    [5]DeviantArt – #amourshipping

    [6]Tumblr – An Amourshipping Blog

    [7]Tumblr – serenabellissima

    [8]Tumblr – pokemonaremylife

    [9]Tumblr – mrericthenerd

    [10]Serebii Forums – Amourshipping


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    About

    Last Time the Cubs Won the World Series refers to a series of jokes about Major League Baseball’s Chicago Cubs who, before November 2nd, 2016, had not won a World Series championship since 1908. The jokes spiked on Twitter during Game 7 of the 2016 World Series between the Cubs and Cleveland Indians as users mocked attempts by Fox Sports Network and others to provide historical context for how long it had been since the Cubs won the World Series by stating facts about 1908.

    Precursor

    The Cubs’ World Series championship drought, the longest in baseball history, has long inspired jokes about the Cubs’ 20th century misfortune, including self-deprecating ones from Cubs fans. One of the best known early references to the Cubs struggles came from Cubs announcer Jack Brickhouse, who called Cubs games on WGN-TV from 1948-1981, when he noted “Anyone can have a bad century”[1] in 1977.



    Origin

    The advent of the internet brought jokes about the Cubs’ long futility to the web. The earliest memes came in the form of demotivational posters and image macros, and were as a way to mock Cubs fans. While it’s unclear which was the first internet image to reference the Cubs’ futility, a demotivational poster celebrating the 2005 World Series win of the Cubs’ crosstown rivals, the Chicago White Sox (shown below, center), indicates they were being made as early as 2005.



    Spread

    Jokes and fascination with the Cubs’ had small resurgences in 2008,[2] the 100 year anniversary of their last World Series win, and in 2015,[3] when the Cubs lost to the New York Mets in the National League Championship series.

    2016 World Series

    In 2016, the Cubs had the best record in the National League and were one of the favorites to win the World Series heading into the postseason. This lead to a spike in articles listing historical events that had yet to happen the last time the Cubs won the World Series, including pieces from Heavy.com[4] and Business Insider.[5] The Cubs beat the San Francisco Giants and Los Angeles Dodgers in the National League playoffs to reach the World Series, where they faced the Cleveland Indians.

    Game 7

    On November 2nd, the Cubs faced off against the Cleveland Indians in Game 7 of the World Series. As the Cubs jumped out to an early lead, Neil Degrasse Tyson began to tweet facts about what had happened the last time the Cubs won.[6]



    This drew the mockery of Twitter users, who found the tweets a pedantic buzzkill.[7] Tyson’s tweets inspired a series of jokes in which Tweeters made up absurd facts or told irrelevant information about 1908 as a way to mock the irrelevance of Tyson’s tweets.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    The Type of Email From Hillary Clinton People Like to Ignore is a photoshop meme that spread on Twitter in which users write fake emails from Democratic Presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

    Origin

    On October 31st, 2016, amidst renewed interest surrounding Clinton’s email scandal, reporter Dana Schwartz tweeted a screenshot of an email Clinton sent in which she asks her staff if there was anything she and they could do for a ten year old Yemeni girl who had gotten a divorce at ten years old she’d once met. Schwartz captioned the email, “I feel like this is the type of email from Hillary Clinton people like to ignore.” The tweet[1] has gained over 28,000 retweets and 45,000 favorites as of November 3rd, 2016.



    Spread

    The tweet inspired a series of jokes in which users posted fake, humorous emails captioned “I feel like this is the type of email from Hillary Clinton people like to ignore.” Some posted banal topics for humor while others used the format to criticize Clinton’s role for American military involvement in the Middle East. The spread of the jokes was covered by The Daily Dot.[2]

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References


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  • 11/03/16--11:30: Vote From Home
  • About

    Vote From Home is a series of hoax images urging Hillary Clinton supporters to vote for the 2016 Democratic presidential candidate from the comfort of their own homes via text message or social media.

    Origin

    On June 27th, 2016, a photoshopped image urging Clinton supporters to vote for the candidate by posting “Hillary” along with the hashtag “#PresidentialElection” on their Facebook and Twitter accounts was submitted to the /r/The_Donald[1] subreddit, where it received upwards of 2,800 votes (94% upvoted) and 120 comments within four months (shown below). While the post title suggested the image originated on 4chan, no archived threads prior to this date have been found.



    Spread

    On July 15th, 2016, the image was reposted in a thread on the /b/ (random) board of 4chan asking former supporters of Bernie Sanders if they planned to switch their allegiance to Donald Trump.[5] On October 12th, the same image was shared on the WTF Magazine Facebook[2] page, where it gained over 900 shares, 700 reactions and 170 comments within one month. Days later, Republican City Councilman Joshua Lorenz of Murrysville, Pennsylvania reposted the image on Facebook, citing it as “proof that the election process is rigged” (shown below). The post was subsequently deleted by Lorenz, who claimed it was intended as a joke in a statement to the news site Billy Penn.[6]



    On October 17th, Twitter user @mciszek[4] tweeted a Clinton campaign ad claiming that Pennsylvania has “online voting,” urging viewers to “be wary” of the fake images (shown below, left). On October 31st, Redditor JackballJonez submitted a fake Clinton campaign image telling people to vote online by posting “Hillary” and “#PresidentialElection” on Facebook and Twitter to /r/The_Donald[9] (shown below, right).



    On November 1st, theoretical physicist Robert McNees tweeted a screenshot of a “vote from home” image posted by @TheRickyVaughn, urging viewers to “report this account” (shown below, left).[7] The following day, McNees posted a screenshot of a message from Twitter’s customer support, stating that Twitter did not think “attempting to disenfranchise voters” was a violation of their Terms of Service (shown below, right).[8]



    Also on November 2nd, BuzzFeed published an article calling the “Vote From Home” memes an “attempt to disenfranchise voters.” That day, Twitter user @cwarzel tweeted the article to Twitter founder and CEO Jack Dorsey, who replied “not sure how this slipped past us, but now it’s fixed” (shown below). Meanwhile, the @TheRickyVaughn account was suspended.



    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    The Lindsay Lohan/Turkish Government Conspiracy refers to a rumor that American actress Lindsay Lohan is being paid by the Turkish Government to spread support for President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan and the Turkish Government.

    Origin

    On September 27th, 2016, Page Six[1] reported that Lohan was in Turkey, where she was spending time with Syrian refugees. Middle Eastern news site Al Monitor reported that Lohan had visited the same refugee camps as Angelina Jolie, but that Jolie "never elicited the gushing enthusiasm afforded Lohan,” and that “‘Lohan has waded into Turkish politics in a big way, spouting, among other things, one of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s worthier mantras: ‘The world is bigger than five’ -- which is a critique of the UN Security Council.’”

    Spread

    On October 12th, 2016, Lindsay Lohan gave an interview to Haberturk TV in which she praised President Erdoğan, especially after the Turkish military attempted and failed to usurp him in a coup in July. She also praised Turkey for the freedom it affords women, making particular note of the poor treatment in America she received after studying the Koran.

    “In Turkey you have free will as a woman, that’s why it’s amazing here, you can do what you want and it’s accepted. Whereas I am in America and I am holding the Koran and I am the devil. No.



    On November 1st, Perez Hilton tweeted[2] a video of an interview Lohan gave at the opening of her new nightclub in Turkey on October 15th, making note of her bizarre accent, which sounded European.



    The following day, Buzzfeed[3] published an article chronicling the Turkish population’s response to the video and Lohan’s suddenly deep interest in Turkish politics. Many Turkish Twitter users, particularly those against Erdogan, wondered if Lohan was being paid by the Turkish government to spread his beliefs, tweeting in Turkish, “These bullies might have even given her money to have her say ‘the world is bigger than five’”[4] and “I wonder how Lindsay Lohan is spending all the money she made by coming to Turkey and putting on a hijab…”[5]

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/03/16--19:50: Foustas1
  • 20 something year old cunt streaming on twitch and has become a meme with his viewers feelsgoodman.
    thinks hes good at CSGO, but in reality he is really bad, GOODAIM NO BRAINAYAY #giveme5
    .. aka:
    gordon freeman
    freeman gordon
    gordon mememan
    dick head
    freeman mememan


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  • 11/04/16--09:59: Ziggy's Mullet
  • About

    Ziggy’s Mullet is a photoshop meme based on a photograph of Australian teenager Ali Ziggi Mosslmani, who was widely mocked online for his mullet-style haircut. In October 2016, the images saw a resurgence in popularity after Mosslmani filed lawsuits against several publications for posting the photographs, leading to what has been cited as an example of the Streisand Effect.

    Origin

    On July 14th, 2015, photographer Jemerey Nool posted a photograph of Mosslmani dancing with a young woman at an 18th birthday party on his Jnoodles Photography Facebook[2] page (shown below). Over the next 16 months, the post gained over 12,000 comments, 11,000 reactions and 1,600 shares.



    Spread

    On July 15th, 2015, a Facebook[1] page titled “The Holy Mullet” was launched, highlighting the photographs of Ziggy. Within 16 months, the page gathered upwards of 12,000 likes. That day, the Australian news site Stoney Roads[8] published an article highlighting photoshopped versions of the Mosslmani photo (shown below).



    On July 20th, The Daily Mail,[9] The Daily Telegraph[6] and Yahoo News[7] published articles about the photoshop meme. Two days later, the Australian news site News.com.au[10] published an titled “The viral haircut that says so much about Generation Y.”

    Lawsuits

    In October, Mosslmani sued Daily Mail Australia, The Daily Telegraph and KIIS radio for defamation, claiming they implied he was a “ridiculous person” with a “controversial,” “silly” and “horrendous” haircut. Official court documents revealed the Judge Judith Gibson cited a Barber meme referencing the Pythagorean theorem as a “humorous” and “clever” example in her preliminary judgement (shown below).



    “These are very short publications which make the point that the plaintiff’s striking mullet haircut has generated a great deal of interest on the Internet, most of it humorous, and some of it in the form of clever observations, such as the ‘Pythagoras’ direction in one of the memes.”

    Additionally, Gibson added that the the lawsuit “seems to be designed to claim as many imputations as possible while simultaneously avoiding a defence of honest opinion or justification.” On October 26th, the Jnoodles Photography Facebook page created a Mop Head Ziggy[5] photo album, highlighting various examples of the photoshop meme.



    On October 28th, the tech news site Tech Dirt[11] published an article about the lawsuit, saying it created “something of a Streisand Effect.” On November 3rd, 2016, The BBC[4] published an article about the lawsuits, noting that Mosslmani’s friend Paul Behman was a fan of many of the mullet memes, saying “the memes are funny, but I am his friend so I can’t really upset him.”

    Various Examples




    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 11/04/16--10:26: OurMine
  • About

    OurMine is the name of a hacking organization that has hacked high-profile celebrity social media accounts, ostensibly to advertise their cybersecurity commercial services.

    Online History

    Ourmine formed on September 14th, 2014.[1] According to a Reddit post on /r/DramaAlert by Awesome334,[2] the group was formed by a group of 3-5 Saudi Arabians who originally hacked the accounts of Minecraft users. Awesome334 claimed to be a moderator on Minecraft forum HiveMC,[3] and gained knowledge of Ourmine because Ourmine created a nearly identical website which fooled users into giving their information. Through the first year of their existence, Ourmine hacked YouTube, Skype, PayPal, Minecraft, Xbox Live, PlayStation and HiveMC accounts.[4] On July 29th, 2015, Softpedia reported that the group had performed DDoS attacks on 9 financial institutions, though they did not specify which. On June 20th, 2016, OurMine launched a website[7] in which they bragged about who they’d hacked.

    Markiplier Hack

    The group gained its most attention to date when it hacked popular Youtube gamer Markiplier on January 12th, 2016.[5] They posted a since-deleted video to his account that was titled “Hacked by OurMine Team.” They later published a screenshot of Markiplier’s earnings for the month of November 2015.[6]

    High Profile Hacks

    In the summer of 2016, Ourmine pulled off a series of very high-profile hacks, including Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales, Pokemon GO creator John Hanke, Twitter founder Jack Dorsey, GoogleCEO Sundar Pichai (shown below), and Mark Zuckerberg. In all instances, the group publicized the hack merely to advertise their cybersecurity services.



    It was around this time OurMine drew the attention of major media outlets, including Wired,[8] who interviewed an anonymous member of OurMine. They insisted that they were not a “blackhat” group (meaning malicious), but that they “are just trying to tell people that nobody is safe.” They also hacked the website TechCrunch.[9]

    Buzzfeed Hack

    On October 4th, 2016, Buzzfeed[10] published an article in which they identified one of the hackers as Ahmad Makki. OurMine denied that Makki was a hacker, but merely a fan of OurMine. The next day, OurMine hacked Buzzfeed,[11] defaced several posts to read “Hacked by OURMINE,” and threatened the site in a deleted post that read: “Hacked by OurMine team, don’t share fake news about us again, we have your database.Next time it will be public. Don’t fuck with OurMine again.”

    Youtube Hacks

    On October 30th, OurMine hacked the tech platform VidIQ, which is utilized by several popular Youtube accounts. Using a feature in VidIQ that allows users to edit their video titles and descriptions en masse, OurMine made the videos of a dozen YouTube channels, including iJustine, KittiesMama, and the Bajan Canadian, read “Hacked by OurMine.” The event was covered by Daily Dot.[12]



    Online Presence

    OurMine used to have a Twitter account where they posted about their hacking successes, but it has been suspended. They have Facebook fan page which has nearly 2,000 likes.[13] They have an official song, which is a parody of Ariana Grande’s“One More Time.”



    Search Interest

    External References


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