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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 10/18/16--11:28: Red Dead Redemption
  • About

    Red Dead Redemption is a open world action-adventure game by Rockstar Games set in the Old West, in which the player controls the protagonist John Marston on a mission to rescue his wife and son. In October 2016, Rockstar announced that a sequel is set for release in fall 2017.

    Gameplay

    In the game, players control Marston from a third-person perspective, exploring through the American Frontier setting in which they complete various missions and combat enemies using firearms. Players can tame horses and ride them for increased travel speed, and can ride trains to instantly transport to another location. A morality system grants players with positive or negative honor points based on their actions in the game.

    History

    On May 18th, 2010, Rockstar Games released Red Dead Redemption for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 consoles. Over the next year, several DLC packages were released, including Outlaws to the End, Legends and Killers, Liars and Cheats, Hunting and Trading, Undead Nightmare and Myths and Mavericks. In October 2011, a Game of the Year Edition was released for Xbox 260 and PlayStation 3 consoles, containing all previously released DLC packs.



    Red Dead Redemption 2

    In mid-October, Rockstar Games posted several tweets leading up to an announcement that Red Dead Redemption 2 would be released in Fall 2017 (shown below). Within 24 hours, the announcement tweet received more than 134,000 likes and 108,000 retweets.[5]



    On October 16th, 2016, the video game news site GamesRadar[2] published an article arguing that Red Dead Redemption 2 should be set in the modern day rather than the Old West.

    The following day, Redditor BerserkWolfUK posted a screenshot of the headline titled “When you sigh so hard you spit out your tonsils” to /r/gaming,[1] where it gathered upwards of 7,500 votes (85% upvoted) and 970 comments. Meanwhile, a post complaining about the article was submitted to /r/KotakuInAction.[4]



    Online Presence

    On February 16th, 2009, the “Red Dead Redemption” Facebook[7] page was created, gaining over 41,000 likes in eight years. On January 24th, 2010, the Red Dead Wiki[3] was launched, accumulating more than 1,800 pages over the next seven years. On April 4th, the /r/reddeadredemption[6] subreddit was created for discussions about the game. On May 21st, YouTuber Robbaz uploaded a video in which the player ties up a woman and places her on railroad tracks in front of a moving train (shown below, left). On May 22nd, YouTuber WhereDaBootz uploaded footage of a glitch in which a woman can be ridden like a horse in the game (shown below, right). .



    On June 14th, the Machinima YouTube channel uploaded a montage titled “Bloopers, Glitches & Silly Stuff” from Red Dead Redemption (shown below, left). On April 16th, 2013, YouTuber TheGamingLemon uploaded a compilation of “funny moments” recorded in the game (shown below, right).



    Reception

    The original Red Dead Redemption was released to critical acclaim, having gained an average score of 95/100 on the review aggregator site Metacritic.[12] By August 2015, the game had shipped over 14 million units. Additionally, Red Dead Redemption received several Game of the Year awards from various video game news sites, including GameSpy, GameSpot and Machinima.

    Controversies

    PC Release

    Many gaming enthusiasts have criticized Rockstar for not releasing a PC compatible version of the original game. Following the announcement of the sequel in October 2016, the lack of PC support was widely condemned online, while many noted that Rockstar’s Grand Theft Auto titles received delayed release dates for PCs.[8][10] On October 18th, a petition urging Rockstar to release the sequel on PC systems was submitted to Change.org,[11] where it gathered upwards of 6,500 signatures within five hours.



    Related Memes

    Red Dead Redemption Teasers

    Red Dead Redemption 2 Teaser Edits is a photoshop series based on the second teaser image for the upcoming sequel game Red Dead Redemption 2. On October 18th, 2016, Redditor EpicAbcdude uploaded an edited teaser image referencing the cover art for Daft Punk’s 2013 disco hit “Get Lucky” to /r/reddeadredemption[14] (shown below). That day, a compilation of notable examples was published on the video game news site VG24/7.[13]



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/18/16--20:58: Polished Peruvian Memes
  • No pienso terminar esta huevada en un solo dia paltean oe


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  • 10/19/16--09:09: Rush Limbaugh
  • About

    Rush Hudson Limbaugh III is a conservative American radio talk show host. His program, The Rush Limbaugh Show, is the most listened to talk-radio program in the United States, according to December 2015 estimates. He is most notable for his strong conservative opinions and his stance against what he perceives as liberal media bias. According to a Forbes 2015 survey, he is the 11th-highest paid celebrity in the world.[1][2]

    History

    Limbaugh worked in music radio until 1984, when he took a job as a radio talk show host at KFBK in San Francisco. He made a name for himself espousing controversial opinions following the repeal of the FCC’s Fairness Doctrine, which had required that stations provide air time for rebuttals of controversial takes. His success brought him to New York City in 1988, when he debuted his national radio show during the 1988 Presidential Election.

    In the 90s, he continued to grow his influence by ridiculing peace activists of the Persian Gulf War and the policies of the Bill Clinton administration.

    In 2003, Limbaugh was briefly an NFL commentator for ESPN, until a few weeks into the 2003 season, when he opined that Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Donovan McNabb was overrated because of the media’s desire to see black athletes and coaches do well. After the comments, Limbaugh resigned.



    The same year, Limbaugh admitted he was addicted to pain medication. In 2006, he turned himself into the authorities following a warrant for his arrest on “a single charge of prescription charge.”

    In 2013, news reports that Cumulus Media, who broadcast Limbaugh’s show in certain major markets, were considering dropping Limbaugh because of belief that his controversial opinions were hurting advertising revenue. Ultimately, the sides agreed on a new contract that moved Limbaugh’s show from WABC to WOR.

    Social Media Presence

    Limbaugh maintains a strong social media following despite not posting much, with over 2.1 million Facebook likes[3] and over 510,000 Twitter followers.[4]

    Reputation

    Limbaugh is extremely popular with conservatives, having gained dozens of awards from Conservative media groups. However, his views have drawn the ire of many in the middle and left of the American political spectrum. He has made several racially insensitive comments, including “all newspaper composite pictures of wanted criminals resembled Jesse Jackson,” and “the NFL all too often looks like a game between the Bloods and the Crips without any weapons.”

    He is also extremely critical of feminism, and is credited as popularizing the term feminazi. Other notable controversies include him accusing Michael J. Fox of exaggerating his Parkinson’s disease on television to promote stem cell research, accusing Iraq War veterans opposed to the war as “phony soldiers,” and calling law student Sandra Fluke, who had recently appealed to House Democrats about mandating insurance coverage for contraceptives, a “slut” and "prostitute.

    Related Memes

    On his show, Rush Limbaugh has pushed conspiracy theories with little supporting evidence, which has made him the target of online ridicule.

    Lesbian Farmers

    In August of 2016, Limbaugh pushed a conservative theory that Barack Obama was sending Lesbian Farmers to rural states in America in order to turn them blue, which led to an outpouring of mockery from the LGBTQ community.

    Weird Twitter Troll

    In October 2016, he fell for a Weird Twitter troll tweet in which Twitter user RandyGDub said he was a Columbus Ohio post office worker who loved to rip up absentee ballots for Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump. He reported it on his show as a fact and was roundly mocked by media outlets, including MSNBC’s Chris Hayes.

    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    “Did You Just Assume My Gender?” is a punchline used to mock the sensitivity of feminists, Social Justice Warriors, and the discussions going on in the LGBTQ community, particularly the Trans and Queer communities, involving gender identification.

    Origin

    In online discussions, a vocal community of people who identified as genderqueer[1] or genderfluid (neither a boy or girl) grew on Tumblr and certain subreddits as part of Social Justice Blogging and increased awareness surrounding gender issues. “Did You Just Assume My Gender?” first appeared as a punchline mocking the supposedly militant nature of feminists and queer activists in a May 1st, 2016 post on Imgur by JCMorrowx.[2]



    Spread

    “Did You Just Assume My Gender?” soon became a punchline associated with Triggered[3] memes and social justice warriors. On May 29th, 2016, a thread on /r/OutofTheLoop[4] asked “What’s with people and their gender identities lately?” The top comment read:

    “The gist of it is that once transgender people started to become more socially acceptable, it suddenly became cool (on tumblr at least) to pretend you were transgender or at the very least not bound to just one gender. As a result, certain people started to state the pronouns they wished to be assigned to them (i.e.ce/cir/cirs/cirself instead of he/him/his/himself) and lead to people complaining about being refered to as male or female.”

    Over the course of the summer, “Did You Just Assume My Gender?” jokes trended on 9gag[4] and ifunny.[5] Another thread on /r/OutOfTheLoop appeared on August 24th, this time asking “Where did Did you just assume my gender? come from?”[6]

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/19/16--11:20: Dumpster Fire
  • About

    “Dumpster Fire” is a pejorative expression used to describe something as a spectacular failure or disaster. Online, the phrase frequently arises in the context of political scandals and poorly performing sports teams.

    Origin

    The earliest known use of the expression as a pejorative metaphor was used in a scathing critique of the 1974 horror film The Texas Chainsaw Massacre published in the Arizona Republic[6] newspaper on October 17th, 2003.

    “This bloody, exploitative mess is the cinematic equivalent of a dumpster fire stinky but insignificant.”

    According to The Huffington Post,[2] many have credited American sportscaster Colin Cowherd with popularizing the phrase “dumpster fire” to describe poorly performing sports teams.[4][5]

    Spread

    On July 10th, 2008, Urban Dictionary[1] user Full0n submitted an entry for “Dumpster Fire,” defining it as “a complete disaster” or “something very difficult that nobody wants to deal with” (shown below).



    In May 2016, Oxford Dictionaries[7] added “dumpster fire” to their online dictionary, defining it as "a chaotic or disastrously mishandled situation. On August 16th, the Vlogbrothers YouTube channel released a video in which host John Green lists “16 ways 2016 is not a total dumpster fire” (shown below).



    On June 4th, linguist Mark Liberman published a post on his blog Language Log[8] about the pejorative. On June 6th, the news site Salon[10] published an article referring to Donald Trump’s presidential campaign as a “raging dumpster fire.” On June 24th, The Huffington Post[2] published an article examining the history of the phrase. On September 8th, Redditor Nobyl submitted a photoshopped weather map showing dumpster fires all over the St. Louis, Missouri (shown below). Within one month, the post gathered upwards of 6,800 votes (93% upvoted) and 300 comments on /r/CrappyDesign.



    On October 14th, a GIF in which Republican politicians Donald Trump, Mike Pence, Ted Cruz and Paul Ryan are animated around a blazing dumpster was submitted to /r/EnoughTrumpSpam[9] (shown below). On October 18th, the news site Mother Jones published an article titled “‘Dumpster Fire’ Is 2016’s Meme of the Year,” which discussed the way the expression was used throughout the 2016 United States presidential election.



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Urban Dictionary – dumpster fire

    [2]The Huffington Post – Where did Dumpster Fire Come From

    [3]MotherJones – "":http://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2016/10/dumpster-fire-2016s-meme-year

    [4]False Hustle – Once again its on

    [5]Nunesmagician – Next Time Colin Cowherd in in Town

    [6]Newspapers – Arizona Republic

    [7]Oxford Dictionaries – dumpster fire

    [8]Language Log – dumpster fire

    [9]Reddit – Dumpster Fire

    [10]Salon – Donald Trumps campaign is a raging dumpster fire


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    About

    He Went From “Hello Sir, It’s Nice To Finally Meet You” To “Ya Daughter Calls Me Daddy Too” is a comparison series in which people, fictional characters, or simply objects, are shown alongside each other to signify a change in looks they have undergone; where the first image describes them as more submissive and nice, followed by a second image where they appear much more dominant and in-line with the daddy idol.

    Origin

    On November 24th, 2015, the @BieberBonerz Twitter account, a fan account dedicated to Justin Bieber, posted a tweet in which they compared two photos of the Canadian idol;[1] implying that, over the years, he had lost his initial boyish look from back when he rose to fame and looked much more mature and daddy-like in present day. Over the following year, the tweet managed to gather over 7,300 retweets and 17,500 likes.



    Precursor: He Will Never Have A Girlfriend

    He Will Never Have A Girlfriend is a series of multi-pane rage comics featuring the Cereal Guy rage face reacting to pre-fame and post-fame comparison photographs of celebrities with the titular phrase; using his notable food-spitting reaction towards the second picture to signify the celebrities’ improved mature looks.



    Spread

    On November 27th, the @teenagernotes Twitter account posted the same tweet as @BieberBonerz’,[2] as did the @TheFunnyTeens Twitter account on November 29th.[3] As of a year later, the tweets managed to gather respectively over over 1,800 and 2,700 retweets, as well as 4,200 and 5,700 likes.

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Twitter – @BieberBonerz

    [2]Twitter – @teenagernotes

    [3]Twitter – @TheFunnyTeens

    [4]

    [5]

    [6]


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  • 10/19/16--14:59: Apu Apustaja / Help Helper
  • About

    Apu Apustaja (“Help Helper” in English) is a poorly drawn variation of Pepe the Frog created in the style of "Spurdo Spärde ":http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/spurdo-sparde. While originally popularized on the Finnish image board Ylilauta, the character is also frequently posted on 4chan where he is referred to as “help helper.”

    Origin

    The character is rumored to have originated from the Finnish image board Ylilauta. [Researching]

    Spread

    On March 25th, 2016, an anonymous 4chan user submitted a poorly drawn version of Pepe captioned with a misspelled sentence about a “food help helper” to the /b/ (random) board (shown below, left).[1] The following day, a similar thread was submitted to /b/ in which the character complains that his “food help helper” was missing (shown below, right).



    On October 2nd, 2016, an illustration of the character was submitted alongside Pepe the Frog-themed parody lyrics for the theme song from the science fiction television show Firefly to 4chan. The following day, a screenshot of the post reached the front page of the /r/4chan subreddit.[3]



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Archive.is – hi all mi food help helper

    [2]Archive.is – "":http://4archive.org/board/b/thread/675962015

    [3]Reddit – /pol/tard writes a poem


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  • 10/19/16--17:55: #ScienceMustFall
  • About

    #ScienceMustFall is a hashtag representing a movement to abolish modern science and replace it with a new understanding of science built from the ground up. The movement was started by a group of students known as “fallists” at the University of Cape Town who want to “decolonize” science from western modernity. The movement is also an offshoot of the ongoing #FeesMustFall movement which began is October of 2015. The hashtag quickly became co-opted by those who felt that the movement was absurd and quickly began to point out the apparent faults in such an idea.

    Origin

    On October 13th, 2016, YouTuber UCT Scientist uploaded a video in which several students fro the University of Cape Town sit before the University’s science faculty to make the case that modern science is too heavily influenced by the West, and that science as a whole needs to be abolished and remade from a new perspective (shown below).



    Spread

    Following the video’s upload several news sites began to comment and critique it such as BusinessTech,[1] Heat Street,[2] and Times Live.[3] Many sites pointed to specific excerpts from the video, namely one where one of the students equates Isaac Newton’s theory of gravity to witchcraft. Within one week the hashtag gained several hundred tweets including one from well known YouTuber and music critic Anthony Fantano (shown below).




    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/19/16--20:21: Bigly
  • About

    Bigly is an archaic English adverb that means “in a big manner,” which became a word of interest due to its frequent use by Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during the 2016 United States presidential primaries and debates.

    Origin

    The word “bigly” has been recognized as one of Donald Trump’s many favorite buzzwords, or “Trumpism” as they became known to be, since the beginning of his presidential campaign in June 2015. During his presidential announcement speech, Trump was quoted as saying “Obamacare kicks in in 2016 really bigly.” On July 4th, 2015 YouTuber John Doe submitted a video featuring Trump’s quote and a text-to-speech reading of the text.

    Spread

    On September 24th, 2015, Slate[1] published an article titled “Is Donald Trump’s Favorite Term Bigly or Big League? You Make the Call,” along with a supercut video of Trump using the word during his stump speeches at campaign rallies (shown below), which reported on the contested nature of the-then Republican presidential hopeful’s pronunciation of “bigly.”

    On February 1st, 2016, Oxford Dictionaries ran an article chronicling a number of words that Trump has been known to mispronounce or struggle with during speeches at campaign rallies, including his ambiguous pronunciation of the word “bigly,” which has been speculated by his detractors as an unintended mispronunciation of “big league,” another term that has been long favored by Trump.

    On April 11th, 2016, Trump’s “bigly” habit was mentioned in a New Yorker article titled “Examining the Vocabulary of the Presidential Race.”

    Indiana Victory Speech

    On May 3rd, 2016, Trump gave a speech in South Bend, Indiana shortly after his landslide victory in the state primary and rival candidate Ted Cruz’ announcement of suspending his campaign. Towards the end of the speech, Trump was quoted as saying:



    “We’re not going to lose, we are going to start winning again and we’re going to win bigly.”

    In the following days, Trump’s Indiana victory speech went viral and prompted a handful of jokes poking fun at the presidential candidate’s limited range of vocabulary, including a comedy sketch on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon (shown below).



    Presidential Debates

    In October 2016, the online interest in Donald Trump’s “bigly” obsession rapidly grew throughout the course of the three presidential debates, reaching its peak during the third and last debate on October 19th. According to Google, “bigly” was the third most searched term relating to Trump’s responses during the debate.

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/20/16--02:02: Eggo Doggo
  • Eggo Doggo was originally made by Bryan Chavez and published to YouTube. (Shown below)

    The video featured Japanese man 岳パラダイス (Takeshi Paradise) placing an egg on his Shiva Inu without falling. View here: https://www.facebook.com/shibainu.gaku/videos/1750240775239384/
    Bryan also overlayed the video with audio from “Epic Kazoo man (Epic sax man cover)”.


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  • 10/20/16--02:59: Galed teh Pukemàn
  • Galed, a deliberate misspelling of “Gallade”, refers to a series of fan artworks and game modifications featuring a poorly illustrated version of the pokemon character Gallade. Galed is commonly associated with another poorly-drawn illustration of Gallade titled “Gotta Go Fast” like Sanic.


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  • 10/20/16--03:52: Queen Elizabeth II
  • About

    Queen Elizabeth II is the current Monarch of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northen Ireland. She has served as the monarch since Febuary 6th, 1952 and is the longest reigning monarch in British History.

    Online, she has been the subject of several memes and image macros, the most notable being One Is Not Amused, which surfaced during the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

    Biography

    Early life

    Queen Elizabeth II was born on April 21st, 1926. Her parents were the later King George VI and The Queen Mother Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon. Originally, Queen Elizabeth was not supposed to become the Queen, but after King George V died in 1936, her uncle Edward VIII became King. However, he abdicated shortly afterwords due to his wish to marriage Wallis Simpson, an American woman who, due to have been divorced two times, were seen as being unfit to be Queen. Elizabeth’s father then became king, and she became heir to the British Empire.

    World War II

    After World War II broke out in 1939, Elizabeth was moved to Windsor Castle, from where in 1940 she made one of her most famous Radio speeches, where she addressed the children of Great Britain, saying “that in the end, all will be well; for God will care for us and give us victory and peace”.

    In 1942, she was made colonal-in-chief of the Grenadier Guards by her father, and in 1945, she joined the Woman’s Auxiliary Territorial Service where she became a mechanic. The Queen is the only head of state still alive that served in World War II.

    Marriage and Coronation

    Elizabeth married Prince Philip in August 1947. She had first met the prince in 1934, when she was 13 years old. In order to marriage Elizabeh, Philip had to give up his greek and danish royal titles, as well as having to convert to Anglicanism. They were married in Westminister Abbey and the event was broadcasted to 200 million radios around the world.[1]

    In 1948, the Queen gave birth to her first child, Prince Charles. Two years later in 1950, her second child, Princess Anne, was born. Nine years later in 1959, Elizabeth gave birth to her third child, Prince Andrew.

    After having struggled with serious illness for many years, king George VI died on Febuary 6th, 1952. Elizabeth then ascended to the throne and became Queen Elizabeth II. She was coronated on June 2nd, 1953. Not only were the coronation the first to be broadcast live on television, it was also the first major international event to be broadcast around the world, with 20 mllion people watching the Queen make her oath[2]

    1960 – 1990

    In 1963, Elizabeth gave birth to her fourth child, Prince Edward.

    During her tours of foreign countries, there was a fear that she may be attemped assassinated during her visit to Ghana, due to several threats being made to the President of Ghana at the time, and during a visit to Quebec, where local newspapers reported that extremist seperatists were plotting to assassinate her. No attempts to harm the Queen was ever made, though a riot broke out while she was in Montreal in Quebec.

    During the 1960s and 1970s, over twenty countries declared independence from Britain. In 1977, the Queen celebrated her silver jubilee.

    In 1981, during a ceremony, six shots were fired towards her while she rode down the Mall in London. The police arrested a person named Marcus Sarjeant. It was later discovered that the shots fired had been blanks. Sarjeant was sentenced to five years in jail, but was released after only three years had passed.

    1990 – 2000

    A year of particular note is 1992, a year which would eventually be dubbed by the Queen as her annus Horribilis (latin for “horrible year”) due to several factors:

    Mauritius, the last commenwealth realm in Africa, decides to abolish it’s monarchy and become a republic
    The Queen’s son, Prince Andrew, were to be divorced with his wife, Sarah, Duchess of York. In addition, her daughter Anne also divorced her husband, Captain Mark Philips.
    A scandel broke out when it was discovered that the Prince of Wales, Prince Charles, had been having an affair with another woman named Camilla Parker-Bowles. it was also revealed that the princess of Wales at the time, Princess Diana, was not happy about her marriage with the prince of Wales.
    On November 20th, Windsor Castle, the Queen’s private home, caught fire and suffered extensive damage.

    After the Queen had made her speech on november 24th, in which she proclaimed the year to be her annus horribilis, it was annouced two days later that she would start to pay Income tax from 1993 and onwards.
    In addition, on December 9th, John Major, then Prime Minister of the UK, announced that the Prince and Princess of Wales had seperated.

    In 1997, Princess Diana was killed in a car crash in Paris. The Queen was on a holiday when her death occurred. The Queen decided to shield Diana’s two sons, Prince William and Prince Harry from the press, worrying that the pressure might be too much for them. Due to this, the Queen and her husband remained out of public sight for five days, and the flag above Buckingham Palace did not fly on half. The general public was outraged at this, and the royal family’s popularity dropped very quickly. Due to the public’s reaction, The Queen returned to London and on September 5th, she made a live television broadcast, in which she expressed admiration for Diana. Much of the public’s hostility then faded away.

    2000 – 2016

    In early 2002, while preparations for the Queen’s golden jubilee was being made, the Queen’s mother and sister died, with only a month between their deaths. Their deaths made media speculate whether or not the jubilee would be a succes. One million people showed up in London every day of the three day long main celebration.

    In 2012, Queen Elizabeth celebrated her diamond jubilee, with celebrations taking place throughout the commonwealth. While she took on a tour around the United Kingdom, her children and grandchildren visited other member countries of the commonwealth.

    After the death of King Bhumibol Adulyadej of Thailand on 13th of october 2016, the Queen became the longest currently reigning monarch and head of state.

    Online presence

    The Royal Family maintains an official Facebook page and Twitter account, while the Duke and Duchess of Cambrigde and Prince Harry have their own instagram profile. As of July 2016, the Facebook page has over 3 million likes[3] while the Twitter account has over 2 million followers.[4]

    Related Memes

    One Is Not Amused

    One Is Not Amused is a series of image macros based on a picture of the Queen taken during the opening of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. The meme features Queen Elizabeth looking disgruntled, with text often expressing displeasure about various things.

    We Get It, You Smoke Weed

    We Get It, You Smoke Weed is an phrase used to mock those who wears cannabis-patterned clothing and identfies as stoners. The phrase is often used on Tumblr and Twitter alongside pictures of real and fictional characters wearing green. The meme originated when Twitter user @neptunecutie posted a picture of the Queen wearing green clothing accompanied with the words “i hate people who dress like this…….we get it, you smoke weed”

    #QueenFacts

    #QueenFacts is a hashtag that involves posting fake facts about the Queen. The hashtag can be traced back to the 9th of september 2015. The Huffington Post reported about the hashtag in an article titled “Queen Facts That Might Not Be 100% True”.[5]

    External References

    [1]BBCElizabeth II’s wedding

    [2]Science Museum – On the box

    [3]Facebook – The Royal Family

    [4]Twitter – The Royal Family

    [5]The Huffington Post – Queen Facts That Might Not Be 100% True


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  • 10/20/16--08:26: Bad Hombres
  • About

    Bad Hombres refers to a series of jokes made in response to a comment made by Donald Trump during the third 2016 United States Presidential Debate in which he said “We have some bad hombres here and we have to get them out.” The statement sparked jokes on Twitter mocking the comment and Trump’s pronunciation of “hombre,” which to many sounded like “ombré,” a type of hairstyle.

    Origin

    While answering a question about his immigration policy, Trump stated that there were a lot of drug lords in the United States and that they needed to be removed. He concluded his comment by saying “we have some bad hombres here and we have to get them out.”



    Spread

    Immediately after, Twitter began making jokes about the comment. Many included references to 80s comedy film The Three Amigos and jokes about his pronunciation of “hombre” as “ombré,” a type of hairstyle in which one color gradually blends into another.[1]



    The joke became arguably the most popular meme of the night, and was covered by Wired,[2] New York Daily News,[3] Fox News,[4]BBC,[5] and many more.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/20/16--09:52: PewDiePie's Tuber Simulator
  • About

    PewDiePie’s Tuber Simulator is a freemium mobile game developed by Outerminds Inc. for iOS and Android devices. In the game, YouTuber PewDiePie instructs players on how to become a successful vlogger on YouTube by creating videos on trending topics. Following its release in September 2016, the game immediately became the top downloaded app on Apple’s App Store.

    Gameplay

    In the game, players accumulate subscribers and view counts by publishing videos on a variety of topics. To gain levels, the player must purchase objects to be shipped to their room, which arrive after a set amount of time depending on the level of the item. Shipping times can be decreased in the “Puggle” mini game by dropping a pug dog into a food bowl. The in-game currency “Bux” can be purchased with real money, and are used to provide a number of bonuses and unlock items. Additional views and subscribers can be earned by tapping an eagle that randomly flies across the screen.

    History

    On September 29th, 2016, PewDiePie’s Tuber Simulator was released on the Apple App Store[1] and Google Play.[2] That day, PewDiePie released a trailer for the game, which gained over 4.6 million views and 32,000 comments in one month (shown below).



    Online Presence

    On September 30th, 2016, the /r/TuberSim[3] subreddit was launched for discussions about the game. On October 3rd, the /r/TuberSimHouses[5] subreddit was launched for people to share screenshots of their in-game rooms. On October 7th, Redditor sir_jeff_jeff submitted a screenshot of YouTuber Philip DeFranco’sTuber Simulator room to the /r/DeFranco subreddit (shown below).



    Reception

    Within 24 hours of release, PewDiePie tweeted that the game had been downloaded over one million times (shown below, left).[6] On October 4th, PewDiePie tweeted a graph showing that Tuber Simulator had surpassed the game Kendall and Kylie in cumulative installs (shown below, right).[9]



    On October 7th, 2016, RollingStone[8] published an article titled “Why PewDiePie’s New Game Is Proof We’re All Doomed,” which quipped “I wasn’t sure if I was playing a game or being integrated into a human milking machine.” On October 10th, On October 18th, Kotaku[7] published an article titled “PewDiePie’s New Game Is a Bleak Look at Being a YouTube Star.”

    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    Guys Like This Have a 125% Chance of Stealing Your Girl is an image macro series featuring photographs of men depicted as sexually attractive competition for heterosexual female romantic partners, bearing similarities to the “You vs. The Guy She Told You Not to Worry About” series.

    Origin

    On September 25th, 2014, Twitter user @girlideas[1] submitted a phograph of a man wearing a “man bun”: hairstyle juxtaposed next to a photograph of his hair down with the caption “guys with hair like this have a 125% chance of stealing your girl” (shown below). Within two years, the tweet gathered upwards of 2,800 likes and 1,600 retweets.



    Spread

    On June 13th, 2015, the Garlic Bread Memes Facebook[3] page posted a photoshopped version of the original @girlideas tweet with slices of garlic bread superimposed of the man’s hair (shown below).



    On March 17th, 2016, the school.bully Instagram page posted a picture of Michael Cera with the same caption (shown below, left). On July 24th, Instagram user mrgiveyogirlback[4] posted two photographs of Harambe the gorilla along with the caption (shown below, right).



    On September 14th, h3h3productions posted a version of the image macro with a picture of Hugh Mungus on Facebook[5] (shown below, left) On October 10th, 2016, Tumblr user Memewhore[2] posted several photographs of men’s beards along with a picture of Ken Bone with the caption "Guys with facial hair like this have a 125% chance of stealing your girl (shown below, right).



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Twitter – @girlideas

    [2]Tumblr – @memewhore

    [3]Facebook – Garlic Bread Memes

    [4]Instagram – mrgiveyogirlback

    [5]Facebook – h3h3productions


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  • 10/20/16--12:37: Cool Freaks' Wikipedia Club
  • About

    Cool Freaks’ Wikipedia Club, or CFWC, is a Facebook group in which users share strange and esoteric articles and entries from Wikipedia. It started in September of 2013. As of October 20th, 2016, the group has nearly 42,000 followers.

    History

    The group launched on September 24th, 2013.[1] Its format encourages users to post articles from Wikipedia they find fascinating, usually with some text from the article, and long discussions follow. Certain articles have special notoriety within the group, including “Toast Sandwich”[3] and “List of lists of lists.”[4][8]

    Over the course of the following year, CFWC gained over 24,000 members and began to attract media coverage. It was praised by several outlets, most notably The Observer[2] and Mic.[5] Paste[6] named its Twitter the 14th-best Twitter account of 2014.

    Criticism

    As the group got popular, its moderation, particularly its application of trigger warnings and liberal banning policies, drew intense criticism. In 2014, Vice[7] called it “a Shitshow of Esoterica, Political Correctness, and Trigger Warnings,” including screenshots of moderators acting harshly.



    In a since-deleted article, Rory Cox of The Tab called the moderators “bands of extremist ideologues [who] patrol comment threads wielding ‘the banhammer’.” This type of moderation also characterized the group’s now-defunct sister site, coolfreaks.jpg. Moderation has gotten less strict in the past two years, and the group now provides an extensive list of rules for posting.[9]

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/20/16--15:08: OSSLT 2016
  • OSSLT is a literacy test conducted every year.


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    About’

    “We need to build a wall” is a quote said by Donald Trump so he could block the Mexicans.

    Origin

    W.I.P.



    Spread

    W.I.P.

    Various Examples


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  • 10/21/16--08:53: My Uncle Works at Nintendo
  • About

    My Uncle Works at Nintendo is a facetious statement which is often jokingly used to spread false insider information about Nintendo and its upcoming projects.
    People try to get others to believe that they have received insider information from their uncle who supposedly works at the video game company. For example:

    “My uncle works at Nintendo and he said Raiden will be a playable character in the next Super Smash Brothers.

    The lie is so well known that in internet culture, it has become a joke way for people to signal that any information they’re about to say will be false.

    Origins

    The exact origins of the phrase are unknown, but it is commonly understood to have its roots in the 80s, during the early days of Nintendo. Cabel Sasser, who worked on the indie video game Firewatch, claims to have known about the lie since the 1980s, when information about future video games was not as readily available as it became with the advent of the internet.[1] One of the earliest references to the lie online came in a 2002 post on LostMediaWiki,[2] in which a commenter criticized the sourcing on an article about Pokémon Crystal with:

    “Some guy in Japan” isn’t a great source. You might as well say “My cousin’s uncle’s brother who works for Nintendo” like back in the Pokémon days on the playground.

    Spread

    The “Uncle Who Works at Nintendo” is credited as one of the sources of early video game urban legends, like being able to find Mew under a truck in the first generation Pokémon games, finding the Triforce in Legend of Zelda": Ocarina of Time, unlocking Sonic the Hedgehog and Tails in Super Smash Brothers Melee, seeing Lara Croft nude in Tomb Raider, etc.[3][1]

    Online Use

    As the internet developed communities devoted to video games, the “Uncle Who Works at Nintendo” was widely recognized as a signal the person citing him was lying. A few Advice Animals were made mocking the idea (shown below).



    On June 2nd, 2009, Something Awful posted a satirical article in which they posted a mock interview with a “Guy Whose Uncle Works For Nintendo.”[4]TV Tropes includes “My Uncle Works at Nintendo” in a list of Nintendo memes,[5] defining it as “The go-to explanation/response for how someone would get insider info on a game, especially if it’s obviously fake.” On January 7th, 2014, a Tumblr dedicated to joking about fake Nintendo rumors launched called “My Dad Works At Nintendo.”[6]

    On October 15th 2014, a text-based horror game called “The Uncle Who Works at Nintendo”[7] was released.

    On March 31st, 2016, Campo Santo[1] published an article about the phenomenon, along with the story of Cabel Sasser, a real life “Uncle Who Works at Nintendo” (though Sasser works at Panic, not Nintendo). Sasser asked his nephew what would be a fair price for Firewatch, and he said $20. The nephew then posted in the Firewatch forums on Steam that his uncle told him the game would be $20, thus marking one of the first known times when the “Uncle Who Works at Nintendo” story turned out to be true.



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/21/16--10:16: #TrumpBookReport
  • About

    #TrumpBookReport is a Twitterhashtag used to imagine Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump delivering a book report on classic pieces of literature.

    Precursor

    On September 17th, 2015, Donald Trump gave a roundabout answer to a question about how he would revive the American Dream, prompting jokes from people who were reminded of someone who was responding to a question in english class who had not done the assigned reading.



    Origin

    During the third 2016 United States Presidential Election Debate, Missouri politician Antonio French[1] tweeted "Trump’s foreign policy answers sound like a book report from a teenager who hasn’t read the book. “Oh, the grapes! They had so much wrath!” As of October 21st, 2016, the tweet has nearly 15,000 retweets and over 28,000 likes.


    Spread

    Following French’s tweet, Twitter users began sharing their impressions of Trump giving book reports using the hashtag, #TrumpBookReport. #TrumpBookReport was trending the following day,[2] and it was covered by media outlets including Huffington Post, Buzzfeed,[3] The Guardian,[4] The National Observer,[5] and others. AJ+ tweeted a video recap of the hashtag (shown below).




    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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