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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 09/27/16--08:01: Trump Sniffles
  • About

    Trump Sniffles refers to a series of tweets criticizing Republican Presidential nominees Donald Trump for loudly breathing through his nose during the first presidential debate of the 2016 United States Presidential Election.

    Origin

    On September 26th, 2016, Trump and Democratic nominees Hillary Clinton met at Hofstra University in New York for the first presidential debate. Early on in the debate, Trump’s answers were frequently interrupted by his sniffles.



    Spread

    Social media users quickly picked up on the frequency of Trump’s sniffling, and began making jokes and spreading tongue-in-cheek rumors about his health and/or possible cocaine use in reference to #HackingHillary, a hashtag spread by Trump supporters following Clinton’s bout with pneumonia.[1][2] Trump’s sniffles inspired over a dozen parody accounts devoted solely to the sniffling.[4]



    In a tweet, Former Governor of Vermont Howard Dean suggested Trump’s frequent sniffing might indicate cocaine use.[3] The tweet, shown below, gained nearly 25,000 retweets and 37,000 favorites in less than twelve hours.



    Late night television hosts also joked that the sniffles were caused by cocaine use, including Stephen Colbert[5] and Trevor Noah.[6]

    CNN, CNBC, Bustle,[8] Reuters,[9]USA Today,[10] and more covered the social media reaction to Trump’s sniffling.

    The following day, Trump denied that he had the sniffles, and blamed the audio of him sniffling on a “terrible” microphone and floated the idea that he was given a terrible microphone on purpose.[7]

    Various Examples



    External References


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    Overview

    The 2016 United States Presidential Election Debates are a series of debates between Republican candidate Donald Trump and Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton for the 2016 United States presidential general election.

    Background

    In the 2016 United States presidential election, Clinton and Trump were on enough ballots to potentially reach 270 electoral votes and more than a 15% polling average, the criteria set for by the Commission on Presidential Debates (CPD) to be eligible to participate in the schedule debates. Both Green Party nominee Jill Stein and Libertarian Party nominee Gary Johnson did not reach the minimum polling average, making them ineligible for the events.

    Developments

    September 26th Debate

    The first general election debate was held on September 26th, 2016 at Hofstra University in New York City (shown below).



    Online Reactions

    On the /r/blackpeopletwitter subreddit, several posts poking fun at the debates reached the front page (shown below).[7][8][9] Meanwhile, several news sites published listicles highlighting notable tweets and memes posted about the debates, including US Weekly,[12] The Daily Mail,[13] Heavy[14] and NY Mag.[15]



    Trump’s Sniffles

    Trump Sniffles refers to a series of tweets mocking Trump for sniffling through his nose during the debate. Social media users quickly picked up on the frequency of Trump’s sniffling, and began making jokes and spreading tongue-in-cheek rumors about his health and possible cocaine use. Additionally, Trump’s sniffles inspired over a dozen parody accounts devoted solely to Trump sniffling.[4]



    Lester Holt’s Moderation

    The event was hosted by NBC anchor Lester Holt, who became the subject of many online discussions and jokes throughout the debate.



    In the coming days, several news site published articles about the online reaction to Lester Holt’s moderation, including BuzzFeed,[1] Romper[10] and USA Today.[11] Meanwhile, artist Ben Garrison released a political cartoon accusing Holt of bias against Trump in his line of questioning (shown below).



    400-Pound Hacker

    When discussing the Democratic National Committee email leak, Trump stated “Maybe the DNC hacker was someone sitting on his bed who weighs 400 pounds” (shown below).



    That evening, many joked about the statement online, leading the news sites Fortune,[3] UpRoxx[4] and CBS[5] to post articles highlighting notable internet reactions (shown below).



    “Call Sean Hannity”

    When discussing whether or not he supported the Iraq War, Trump repeatedly exclaimed that no journalists would “call Sean Hannity” when investigated his early stances on the United States military action (shown below, left). Following the debate, Hannity interviewed Trump and corroborated Trump’s statements that he was previously against the Iraq War (shown below, right).



    Later that evening, The Ringer podcast called Hannity during the broadcast to ask him about the debate segment, leading Hannity to hang up the phone (shown below).




    #TrumpWon

    The next morning, the hashtag #TrumpWon[17] began trending on Twitter, which supporters of the Republican presidential candidate used to praise their candidates performance, while critics tweeted the hashtag sarcastically.



    Meanwhile, Trump tweeted the hashtag himself, thanking his supporters for helping it become a trending topic on the social media platform (shown below).[16]



    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    “Please Don’t Write Something Snarky” refers to a series of sarcastic jokes mocking a tweet by comedian Mike Birbiglia where he used the phrase as a caption to a picture of first lady Michelle Obama hugging former president George W. Bush.

    Origin

    On September 25th, 2016, Birbiglia tweeted a screenshot of a New York Times headline that read “For Some, Bush-Obama Rapport Recalls a Lost Virture: Political Civility.”[1] Birbiglia, struck by the headline and the picture of the Obama family and Bush family acting friendly, attempted to express his genuine emotional response to the photo by captioning the screenshot, “This is powerful. I’m sorry, but it is. Please don’t write something snarky.”



    Spread

    Birbiglia deleted the tweet following a mass amount of replies from Twitter users reminding him of Bush’s disastrous foreign policies and various dangerous mistakes as president.[2] Nevertheless, the tweet inspired hundreds of sarcastic variations where Twitter users took Birbiglia’s caption and applied it to bizarre and silly photos, including Loss.jpg, [3] a screenshot of He-man,[4]Sonic the Hedgehog, [5] the first 2016 presidential debate, [6] and many more. That day, The Daily Dot[2] and New York Magazine[7] covered the spread of the joke.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References


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  • 09/27/16--09:38: Nazi Pepe controversy
  • Overview

    Pepe the Frog was the subject of a racism controversy in the summer of 2016 when Hillary Clinton and several news organizations produced reports suggesting that the popular frog is -- and always was -- exclusively a white supremacist symbol.

    Origins

    On May 26th, 2016, The Daily Beast[1] published an article titled “How Pepe the Frog Became a Nazi Trump Supporter and Alt-Right Symbol.“ The article included an interview with Twitter user @JaredTSwift,[2] identified as an “anonymous white nationalist,” who claimed there was a “campaign to reclaim Pepe from normies” by creating anti-Semitic illustrations of the frog character.

    Involvement in U.S. presidential campaign

    On August 25, 2016, Hillary Clinton gave a speech denouncing the alt-right. During Clinton’s address, a /pol/ user posted a thread revealing that he is a member of the audience at the event, to which another user suggested the OP to yell “Pepe” as to interrupt her speech.[3] In the YouTube livestream, a man off the screen can be heard yelling “Pepe!” at approximately 56 minutes in.[4]

    On September 9th, 2016, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton said that half of Donald Trump’s supporters were in a “basket of deplorables.“ On September 10th, Donald Trump Jr. posted a photoshopped movie poster on Instagram[5] of the 2010 action film The Expendables, which features various prominent conservatives and Pepe the Frog with the title “The Deplorables”.

    On September 11th, NBC News[6] published an article about the photoshop, which referred to Pepe the Frog as a “popular white nationalist symbol” based on a statement made by Southern Poverty Law Center’s Heidi Beirich. That same day, several news sites including The Hill,[7] Vanity Fair,[8] Talking Points Memo[9] and CNN[10] published reports describing Pepe as a “white supremacist meme” and “white nationalist symbol.”

    On September 12th, the official Hillary Clinton presidential campaign blog[11] published a post titled “Donald Trump, Pepe the frog, and white supremacists: an explainer,” which labeled Pepe the Frog as “sinister” and a “symbol associated with white supremacy.”

    Initial reactions

    Over the next 24 hours, posts about the news coverage and the Clinton campaign’s reaction reached the front page of various subreddits, including /r/cringe,[17] /r/politics,[12][13] /r/OutOfTheLoop,[14] /r/KotakuInAction,[18] /r/4chan,[15] and /r/The_Donald[16] where many Redditors mocked the Clinton campaign and the mainstream media for failing to understand the Pepe meme. Meanwhile, The Daily Dot[19] published an article titled “Pepe the Frog is not a Nazi, no matter what the alt-right says,” stating that “Pepe lacks political affiliation.”

    On September 14th, the Daily Caller published an interview with @PaulTown_ and @JaredTSwift in which the two Twitter pranksters admitted fabricating the basis of the Daily Beast report. [20]

    That same day, in an article titled “No Hillary, Pepe the Frog is Not a Racist Meme”,[21] Ian Miles Cheong of Heat Street wrote that “no single group or ideology has ownership of the meme.” Heat Street would later retract the article and issue a full apology.

    Further developments

    On September 17th, the Economist published the article “Pepe and the stormtroopers: How Donald Trump ushered a hateful fringe movement into the mainstream” which described Pepe the Frog as “a cartoon-strip creature co-opted into offensive scenarios” and gave the “Deplorables” poster as an example of such an offensive scenario.

    On September 19th, Heat Street founder Louise Mensch wrote “Hillary Clinton Is Absolutely Right, ‘Pepe’ Meme Is Antisemitic – An Apology.”[21] Heat Street retracted Cheong’s article in full and added a note stating “This article was wrong and we should never have published it.”[24] Cheong said on Twitter that “I was wrong about Pepe. It has, in fact, become an anti-semitic meme.”

    By September 26th, the Anti-Defamation League had added Pepe the Frog to its list of hate symbols.[25] The ADL noted that “The majority of uses of Pepe the Frog have been, and continue to be, non-bigoted” and warned that “it is important to examine use of the meme only in context.”

    Related entries

    External references

    [1]The Daily Beast – How Pepe the Frog Became a Nazi Trump Supporter and Alt-Right Symbol

    [2]Twitter – @JaredTSwift

    [3]4plebs – at a hill rally

    [4]Youtube – RBC Network Broadcasting – Full Event: Hillary Clinton Rally in Reno, Nevada (8/25/2016) Hillary Clinton Anti-Trump Speech

    [5]Instagram – donaldjtrump – The Deplorables

    [6]NBC News – Trump Adviser Son Post Image

    [7]The Hill – Trump Jr. and top supporter share White nationalist image on social media

    [8]Vanity Fair – Donald Trump Jr Shares White Supremacist Meme

    [9]Talking Points Memo – Trump Ally Son Share Meme Featuring Symbol Of White Nationalist Alt-Right

    [10]Youtube

    [11]Hillary Clinton – Donald Trump Pepe the frog and white supremacists

    [12]Reddit – /r/politics – Hillary Clinton attacks Donald Trump for posting Pepe the Frog meme

    [13]Reddit – /r/politics – Donald Trump, Pepe the frog, and white supremacists: an explainer

    [14]Reddit – /r/OutOfTheLoop – CNN just called “pepe” a white nationalist meme. Is this true, and where did it come from?

    [15]Reddit – /r/4chan – BREAKING: Pepe is a white nationalist symbol

    [16]Reddit – /r/The_Donald – Hillary officially attacks Pepe. We’ve won folks…My God…We’ve won.

    [17]Reddit – /r/cringe – Hillary Clinton is convinced Pepe is a “symbol associated with white supremacy”

    [18]Reddit – NBC News calls Pepe the Frog a white nationalist symbol

    [19]The Daily Dot – Pepe the Frog is not a Nazi

    [20]The Daily Caller – Here’s How Two Twitter Pranksters Convinced The World That Pepe The Frog Meme Is Just A Front For White Nationalism

    [21]Heat Street – No, Hillary, Pepe the Frog is not a racist meme

    [22]Economist – Pepe and the stormtroopers: How Donald Trump ushered a hateful fringe movement into the mainstream

    [23]Heat Street – “Hillary Clinton Is Absolutely Right, ‘Pepe’ Meme Is Antisemitic – An Apology.”

    [24]Breitbart – Heat Street Apologizes: ‘Never Should Have Published’ Post Saying Pepe the Frog Isn’t Anti-Semitic

    [25]Anti-Defamation League – Hate On Display: Pepe the Frog


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    W.I.P.

    About

    “Orange Soda” also known as “Who Loves Orange Soda?” is a phrase said by Kel from the sitcom Kenan & Kel. the meme made a lot of video’s and commercial’s on The Splat.

    Origin

    The meme originated from the episode


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  • 09/28/16--07:56: Name a More Iconic Duo
  • About

    Name a More Iconic Duo refers to a series of tweets mocking a tweet by @negansvoid[1] that shows a picture of Kardashian family members Kylie and Kendall Jenner captioned “name me a more iconic duo.. I’ll wait.”

    Origin

    On September 24th, 2016, @negansvoid sent out a tweet showing the Jenner sisters, challenging Twitter to name “a more iconic duo,” as if it were impossible (shown below).



    Spread

    The tweet did not begin to spread until September 27th, 2016, when people began sharing it sincerely. One of the first known examples of its spread was a tweet by @celebsconfess[2] that placed a screenshot of @negansvoid’s tweet next to pictures of actors Chris Evans and Sebastian Stan from the Captain America films. Soon, Twitter users took the template to post both sincere and joke choices for more iconic duos. Among the latter were Harambe and the child in his pen he was deemed a danger to,[3]TomBroDude and the picture of the naked man he loved to tweet,[4]Friendship Ended With Mudasir, [5] and more.

    On September 28th, New York Magazine[6] covered the spread of the joke and received clarification from @negansvoid, who has since locked her account due to the attention her tweet received, that the original tweet was not sincere and she does not believe the Jenner sisters are iconic. Paper Magazine[7] also covered the spread.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    Barack Obama In Conversation With Leondardo DiCaprio is a photo caption series based on a picture of United States President Barack Obama speaking to actor Leonardo DiCaprio, in which humorous mock quotes are attributed to Obama.

    Origin

    On September 25th, 2016, the @WhiteHouse[1] Twitter feed posted a photograph of Obama speaking to DiCaprio along with an announcement that the two men would be participating in a “conversation on combating climate change” at the upcoming South by South Lawn (SXSL) event held on October 3rd, 2016. Within 48 hours, the tweet gained over 4,800 likes and 2,000 retweets.



    Spread

    That evening, other Twitter users began retweeting the photo captioned with humorous mock conversations between the two men (shown below).



    Meanwhile, Twitter user @darth[3] posted an edited version with Obama holding a bear cub, captioned with a joke about DiCaprio’s appearance in the film The Revenant (shown below). In the coming days, several news sites published articles about the caption series, including BuzzFeed,[4] UpRoxx,[5] Smosh,[6] Coed,[7] Elite Daily[8] and Brobible.[9]



    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References


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    About

    Pen Pineapple Apple Pen” (Japanese: ペンパイナッポーアッポーペン, PenPainappōAppōPen) is a music video by Piko-Taro (ピコ太郎), a stage persona of the Japanese professional comedian Kosaka Daimaoh (古坂大魔王).[1] In a similar vein to PSY’s Gangnam Style, the video widely circulated on social media after being released on YouTube in late August 2016.

    Origin

    On August 25th, 2016, the music video was released on YouTube, in which Piko-Taro is shown dancing in front of a plain white background while singing about sticking a pen inside a pineapple and an apple to form a pen-pineapple-apple-pen (shown below). Within one month, the video gained over 7.9 million views and 4,000 comments.



    Lyrics:

    I have a pen
    I have an apple
    uuh
    Apple pen!

    I have a pen
    I have a pineapple
    uuh
    Pineapple pen!

    Apple pen
    Pineapple pen
    uuh
    Pen-Pineapple-Apple-Pen!


    Spread

    The following month, the music video began widely circulating on Twitter and the video-sharing app Mix Channel. On September 18th, the おもしろ動画集 YouTube channel posted a compilation featuring parody versions of the music video, receiving more than 1.7 million views and 1,300 comments (shown below, left). On September 21st, YouTuber ミクチャLOVE 2 uploaded a montage including several young women performing lip dubs of the song. In one week, the video gained over 1.6 million views and 500 comments.



    On September 24th, YouTuber Chee Yee Teoh reposted the original music video, gaining upwards of 8.6 million views and 8,500 comments in four days. The following day, 9GAG reposted the original video on their Facebook page,[3] where it gathered upwards of 57 million views and 1.08 million shares in 72 hours. On September 26th, YouTuber Taylor Kazunobu posted a montage video of people lip syncing the song (shown below). The following day, YouTuber Edho Zell posted a parody version of the music video (shown below, right). Meanwhile, an image outlining the history of Piko-Taro’s comedy was submitted to 9gag.[8]



    Also on September 27, both CNN[5] and the BBC[4] published articles about the viral video and Justin Bieber tweeted that it was his “favorite video on the internet” (shown below).[6] Over the next 24 hours, the tweet gained over 75,000 likes and 43,000 retweets.



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 09/28/16--09:32: Sad Bernie Sanders
  • About

    Sad Bernie Sanders refers to jokes about and photoshops of a picture of Vermont senator and former Democratic candidate for president Bernie Sanders tweeted of himself prior to the first Presidential Debate of 2016 between Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton watching CNN’s coverage of the event on television. It struck many Twitter as sad, which inspired jokes and parodies.

    Origin

    On September 26th, 2016, Bernie Sanders tweeted a picture of himself watching CNN’s coverage of the moments before the first Presidential debate of the 2016 United States Presidential Election with the caption “It’s #debatenight so it’s time to #DebateWithBernie,”[1] recalling the hashtag Sanders used to tweet during the 2016 Republican Presidential Primary debates. The tweet, shown below, gained over 12,000 retweets and 30,000 favorites in a day and a half.



    Spread

    People immediately began reacting to the tweet as it stirred feelings of sadness. Many people responded to the image by wishing Sanders were on the debate stage instead of Trump and Clinton,[2][3][4] while others joked about how sad the image was.[5][6]



    After the debate, a Photoshop battle appeared on Reddit[7] challenging posters to make Sad Sanders photoshops and gained over 5,000 upvotes as of September 28th, 2016. Some of the top posts had Sanders watching Primitive Technology (below, left), struggling with modern televisions like a grandfather (below, center), and playing Overwatch (below, right).



    The following day, dozens of news publications published pieces about the popularity of “Sad Bernie Sanders” memes, including Buzzfeed,[8] Mashable,[9] Paper Magazine,[10] Complex,[11] Elite Daily,[12] and more. Sad Bernie Sanders memes had also become a Twitter Moment[13] the following day.

    Various Examples



    External References


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  • 09/28/16--12:07: 400 Pound Hacker
  • About

    400 Pound Hacker refers to a comment made by Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump during the first 2016 United States Presidential Debate in which he disparagingly suggested the hacker in the Democratic National Committee Email Leak could be a someone on their bed who weighs 400 pounds.

    Origin

    While discussing the Democratic National Committee Email Leak, Trump said that while Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton was certain the culprit was Russia, it could just as easily have been China or “someone sitting on their bed that weighs 400 pounds.”



    Spread

    Shortly after the comment, Twitter users reacted at the bizarreness of the comment. Some tweets included photos of South Park and Simpsons characters.[5] One tweet by @pattymo[1] suggested Trump lost the alt-right vote with the comment, and gained nearly 7,800 retweets and 20,000 favorites in two days (shown below).



    Sure enough, backlash to the comment came from 4Chan users, according to articles from The Daily Beast[2] and Forward,[4] who called 4Chan an alt-right board. The Anonymous Twitter account tweeted a picture of a Boogie wearing the Anonymous mask saying “@realdonaldtrump, hey you called?”[3]



    Uproxx[5] covered Twitter’s reaction, while Yahoo[6] covered Trump’s fatshaming. CNet,[8] Gizmodo,[9] Mic,[10] and more covered the comment.

    A Novelty Twitter Account was devoted to the 400 pound hacker and gained over 700 followers.[7]

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 09/28/16--13:15: Lord Tachanka
  • About

    Lord Tachanka is an ironic nickname given to the playable Defending Operator character in the first-person tactical shooter game Rainbow Six Siege, who many fans considered to be poorly designed and under-powered upon release.

    Origin

    On December 1st, 2015, the video game Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Siege was released by Ubisoft. In the game, the character Tachanka is available in the . Upon its release, many players complained that Tachanka would need to be improved to properly balance the game.[2][3][4]



    Spread

    On April 6th, 2016, YouTuber GavinAcity uploaded a video titled “Why You Should Use Tachanka in Rainbow Six Siege,” which provided an overview of the character’s abilities.



    On August 6th, Redditor SikorskyUH60 submitted a post asking about the “Lord Tachanka” meme to /r/OutOfTheLoop,[1] where Redditor Your401kplan noted he was a popular ironic “circlejerking” subject in Rainbow Six online communities. On September 1st, YouTuber Matimi0 uploaded a Rainbow Six gameplay video titled “Lord Tachanka – Rainbow Six Siege,” featuring a montage of impressive kills executed with the character (shown below, left). On September 10th, YouTuber The Chanka posted an edited scene from the film Kick Ass in which Tachanka is shown shooting a room full of enemies while flying on a jetpack (shown below, right).



    On September 25th, Redditor capt_GreenSparks posted a Tachanka-themed mobile phone wallpaper to /r/Rainbow6,[5] captioned with the phrase “How Do You Buff A God?” (shown below). Within 72 hours, the post garnered more than 1,100 votes (89% upvoted) and 50 comments.



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 09/29/16--10:00: Gary Johnson
  • About

    Gary Earl Johnson (born January 1, 1953) is an American politician and businessman who served as the Governor of New Mexico from 1995 to 2003 as a member of the Republican party. He was the Libertarian party nominee for president in the 2012 Unites States Presidential Election and is the party’s nominee in the 2016 United States Presidential Election. [1]

    History

    Born in Minot, North Dakota, Johnson graduated from the University of New Mexico with a Bachelor of Science degree in political science. He then started Big J enterprises in 1976, focusing on mechanical contract work. It grew into a multi-million dollar company, and when he sold the business in 1999, it was one of New Mexico’s leading construction companies.[2]

    Governor of New Mexico

    Johnson became Governor of New Mexico as a member of the Republican party in 1995, following a close primary and a gubernatorial election that he won via plurality.[3] He followed a strict small-government approach, and vetoed 200 of 424 bills in his first six months of office.[4] He proposed a wide range of tax cuts, but during his first term, he raised education spending by nearly a third.

    He won reelection by a margin of 55%-45% in 1998.[5] In his second term, one of his key political goals was the implementation of a school voucher program.[6] He also became one of the highest ranking elected officials to advocate for the legalization of marijuana.[7] He was also widely praised for his handling of the Cerro Grande Fire that devastated New Mexico in 2000.[8] Though the Libertarian Party attempted to draft him for the 2000 United States Presidential Election, he declined, saying he was a Republican and had no intention of running for president.[9]

    Presidential Campaigns

    2012 Presidential Campaign

    Johnson ran for President in 2012 initially as a Republican, but his failure to do well in the polls barred him from appearing in majority of the Republican Primary debates, leading him to eventually withdraw his candidacy and announce that he would run for the Libertarian Party’s nomination on December 28th, 2011.[10] His goal was to win 5% of the popular vote, and though he fell short by winning 1% of the popular vote, he did win the most votes ever by a Libertarian candidate.[11]

    2016 Presidential Campaign

    In November 2014, Johnson announced that his intention to run for the Libertarian nomination for the 2016 United States Presidential Election.[12] On May 18th, 2016, he announced that his running mate would be former Massachusetts governor William Weld.[13] On May 29th, Johnson received the Libertarian nomination. As of September 2016, Johnson has consistently polled between 6-8%.

    Gaffes

    Johnson’s 2016 campaign has been marred by several gaffes. In an April 2016 Libertarian primary debate, Johnson argued that cake stores should legally be obligated to fulfill requests for cakes featuring Nazi symbols.



    On September 8th, 2016, Johnson responded to a question about Aleppo, a major city in Syria engulfed by the refugee crisis, with “What is Aleppo?” which led media outlets to question his knowledge on foreign policy.[14]



    On September 22nd, a video of Johnson talking about global warming and arguing that allocating resources to global warming research was not important because the fate of the Earth is to be swallowed by the sun in billions of years began spreading among media outlets, furthering his reputation that he is an uninformed candidate.[15]



    On September 23rd, Johnson stuck his tongue out and talked to a reporter while making a point that his mere presence in the 2016 Presidential Debates would help him the polls. The act drew ridicule from media outlets who said Johnson clearly did not appear presidential.[16][17]



    On September 28th, Johnson and Weld appeared on MSNBC’s Hardball with Chris Matthews. Matthews asked Johnson to name a foreign leader he respects, and Johnson had trouble naming one, saying he was having “an Aleppo moment.” The comment again drew criticism from media outlets who took it to mean Johnson did not have the foreign policy knowledge to be president.[18]



    Online Presence

    As of September 29th, 2016, Johnson has 1.6 million likes on Facebook,[19] over 356,000 Twitter followers,[20] over 76,700 Instagram followers,[21] and over 20,000 on his dedicated subreddit.[22]

    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    The Google/Clinton Conspiracy Theory refers to a theory that prominent search engine site Google blocks negative autocomplete searches for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton while autocompleting the same searches for Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.

    Origin

    The conspiracy began with a video by SourceFed[1] posted on June 9th, 2016 (shown below) that suggested Google was actively helping the Clinton campaign by blocking negative autocomplete searches. For example, they noticed searching “Hillary Clinton Cri” did not autocomplete to “Hillary Clinton Criminal Investigation” like it did on competing search engine sites Yahoo and Bing, and extrapolated on this observation to suggest Google was in cahoots with the Clinton campaign.



    Spread

    Google’s Vice President of Product Management Tamar Yehoshua responded to the video the following day in a blogpost[2] that clarified Google’s autocomplete feature had been tailored to filter out offensive queries, and that the feature applies to searches for all people. Vox[3] also thoroughly debunked the theory.

    Donald Trump Claims

    On September 28th, 2016, Donald Trump cited the conspiracy while talking about his standing in the polls. “A new post-debate poll, the Google poll, has us leading Hillary Clinton by two points nationwide,” he said. “And that’s despite the fact that Google search engine was suppressing the bad news about Hillary Clinton. How about that.”

    Trump’s comments prompted stories from several news outlets, including The Daily Dot,[4]CNN,[5] and The Verge,[6] who each covered the fact the theory was debunked months earlier.

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 09/29/16--14:43: Mighty Magiswords
  • W.I.P.

    About

    Mighty Magiswords is an American Flash animated online and television series created by Kyle A. Carrozza specifically for Cartoon Network Video being the network’s first online original series.

    History

    Mighty Magiswords is created by Kyle A. Carrozza, an animator, voice actor, musician and storyboard artist who currently writes songs for The FuMP and was previously the creator, storyboard artist and voice actor for his short “MooBeard: The Cow Pirate” on Nicktoons Network series, Random! Cartoons. Produced in Flash animation, this series is the first original cartoon show on Cartoon Network made specifically for online. These characters were created by Kyle when he was at high school in 1996 and was pitched to Cartoon Network in 2005-2006 under the names “Legendary Warriors for Hire” and to Mondo Media in 2007-2008 as “Dungeons and Dayjobs” before Cartoon Network picked it up in 2013. Most of the series is done in-house at Cartoon Network Studios while the oversea mid-production was done at Malaysian animation studio, Inspidea.

    Premise

    The series is about Vambre and Prohyas, a brother and sister team of “Warriors for Hire”, who go on hilarious adventures and crazy quests to collect magical swords. They go all around the world to find the swords.

    Reception

    W.I.P.

    Online Relevance

    W.I.P.

    Fandom

    W.I.P.

    Fan Art

    W.I.P.

    Screen Caps & GIFs

    W.I.P.

    Related Memes

    Choose Your Magisword

    W.I.P.


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  • 09/30/16--08:36: Stefan Molyneux
  • About

    Stefan Molyneux is an Irish-born Canadian blogger. Molyneux writes on topics including anarcho-capitalism, atheism, secular ethics, right-libertarianism, cryptocurrencies, and familial relationships. He hosts a podcast in his site Freedomainradio.com and has written e-books. [1]

    Online History

    Stefan created his podcast called Freedomain Radio in 2005. His Youtube channel was launched in August 7th, 2006. He describes is show in following fashion:

    “With host Stefan Molyneux, topics range from philosophy to economics to art to how to achieve real freedom in the modern world. Passionate, articulate, funny and irreverent, Freedomain Radio shines a bold light on old topics – and invents a few new ones to boot! " -Stefan Molyneux Youtube channel description (read 30th of September 2016).

    Memes

    - Defoo: When discussing relationships, Stefan sometimes urges people to cut their relations with their family as advice. He calls this practice “defooing”. Stefan has cut his relations with his own mother. The advice he has given to the members of his fan base has gotten him the reputation of a cult leader. [2]

    http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=defoo

    -Not an argument: Because Stefan often discusses controversial topics, such as race and intelligence, atheism and anarchism, he frequently gets fierce responses in his Youtube comment sections. Stefan’s responds to his criticism by saying they are not making an argument, or “Not an argument” in short. The phrase has become popular in 4chan and 8chan boards, particularly in /pol/. In 25th of May cartoonist Ben Garrison drew a caricature of Stefan, with his signature quote.

    https://grrrgraphics.wordpress.com/2016/05/25/cartoon-commission-for-stefan-molyneux-not-an-argument/
    http://imgur.com/gallery/xEEXiBo
    https://i.imgur.com/BQqowsu.jpg
    http://2new4.fjcdn.com/pictures/Sjw+comp+not+an+argument+edition+another+sjw+comp+i_463705_5986508.jpg

    [1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stefan_Molyneux
    [2] http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1093993/A-fearful-mother-reveals-The-internet-cult-stole-son.html

    I need help formatting.


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  • 09/30/16--08:51: Roof Koreans
  • About

    Roof Koreans refers to Korean-American business owners who defended their storefronts during the 1992 Los Angeles riots.[7] Images of the shopkeepers standing on rooftops wielding firearms were widely publicized in news media, earning them a reputation for being bold and courageous.

    Origin

    During the Los Angeles riots in 1992, photographs and video of Korean store owners defending their businesses by camping on rooftops with rifles circulated through news media. On January 18th, 2011, the Los Angeles Times[5] published an article about the riots, which highlighted a photograph of several Koreans armed with rifles on a rooftop (shown below).



    On August 11th, the ArmBritain YouTube channel uploaded a news segment about the Korean business owners , which gained over 510,000 views and 1,900 comments over the next five years.



    Spread

    On April 28th, 2012, YouTuber MadMaxTrac uploaded footage of a similar news segment about the store owners (shown below).



    On August 11th, 2014, a Craiglist ad titled “Roof Koreans for hire (Ferguson)” was created, featuring a photograph of Korean store owners camping on their roof wielding rifles (shown below).[4] On August 13th, a screenshot of the post was submitted to the /r/funny[1] subreddit, where it gathered upwards of 3,700 votes (90% upvoted) and 330 comments prior to being archived.



    On April 29th, 2015, Urban Dictionary[3] user FauxTales submitted an entry for “Roof Koreans,” defining it as “Angry Korean store workers who prowl their store roof tops wielding Nagasaki rifles.”



    On July 8th, Redditor monkeymasher submitted a photograph of himself aiming a large firearm titled “Roof Korean for hire. Please call if assistance is needed” (shown below). Within three months, the post gathered upwards of 7,400 votes (80% upvoted) and 1,500 comments on /r/guns.[6] That day, Redditor peecatchwho submitted a post titled "I don’t understand the “Roof Korean” thing in /r/guns" to the /r/OutOfTheLoop[2] subreddit.



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Reddit – Roof koreans for hire

    [2]Reddit – /r/OutOfTheLoop

    [3]Urban Dictionary – Roof Koreans

    [4]Wayback Machine – Roof Koreans for Hire

    [5]LA Times – Not your 1992 LAPD

    [6]Reddit – Roof Korean for hire

    [7]Wikipedia – 1992 Los Angeles riots


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  • 09/30/16--10:00: Emoji Spells
  • About

    Emoji Spells are a series of posts featuring emojis arranged by self-identifying witches on social media with the intention of magically bringing about a desired outcome, such as getting over an ex-boyfriend or calming anxiety.

    Precursor

    A subsection of emoticons known as dongers[1] featured pictorial representations of people using magic. On April 29th, 2015, Japanese.me[2] compiled a list of dongers that appeared to be performing magic for users to copy.



    A Tumblr devoted to Emoji Tarot Cards appeared on September 5th, 2015.[4]

    Origin

    The first known appearance of the “emoji spell” concept appeared on October 29th, 2015, when Vice’s women’s interest sub-site Broadly[3] published an article called “How to Cast Spells Using Emoji” as a part of “Witch Week.” The article featured directions for crafting, casting, and preparing for casting a spell, along with several example spells one can cast.



    Spread

    Following Broadly’s article, witches on social media, primarily on Tumblr, began casting emoji spells. On Tumblr, spell posts instruct users that Likes “charge” the spell and reblogs “cast” it. Some popular spells include one to take down Donald Trump (over 18,000 notes as of September 30th, 2016, shown below),[5] to protect your pets (over 99,000 notes),[9] and save the bees (over 40,000 notes).[10]



    On April 10th, 2016, Bustle[6] published an article detailing one writers attempt to use emoji magic to improve her love life. Mic[7] covered the trend on August 17th 2016, which led to other teen-marketed sites like Teen Vogue[8] and others to cover the spread. At least two Tumblr accounts are devoted solely to creating and sharing Emoji Spells.[11][12] They have received backlash within the witchcraft community, as some believe the practice of liking to “charge” spells to be disingenuous.[13]

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 09/30/16--11:59: Pen Spinning
  • About

    Pen Spinning, also known as pen twirling, is the practice rotating a writing instruments between one’s fingers. Online, communities dedicated to pen spinning have arisen on a variety of platforms, and videos showcasing pen spinning tricks are often shared on YouTube.

    Origin

    Pen spinning was originally popularized in Japan in the 1970s. In 1997, Japanese pen spinner Hideaki Kondoh created the first pen spinning website on Geocities.[4] In 2000, the English language pen spinning enthusiast site Pentix[5] was launched by spinner Fernan Kuo (a.k.a. Kam), who subsequently shutdown the site indefinitely in 2003.

    Spread

    In January 2004, the Universal Pen Spinning Board[1] was launched for discussions about the practice. On March 29th, 2006, YouTuber roylys84 posted a pen spinning tricks montage. Within ten years, the video gained over 3.5 million views and 3,300 comments (shown below, left). On March 14th, 2007, YouTuber RukarioRey uploaded an instructional video titled “Pen Spinning Basics,” which accumulated more than 3.9 million views and 3,100 comments over the next nine years (shown below, right).



    On April 18th, 2008, the Diagonal View YouTube channel uploaded a short video about the Thaispinner pen spinning club in Bangkok, Thailand (shown below, left). On September 10th, 2009, YouTuber learnfromlance posted a tutorial video for performing a “thumbaround” pen spin (shown below, right). Over the next seven years, the videos received over 1.7 million views each.



    On July 25th, 2010, the /r/penspinning[2] subreddit was launched for discussions about pen spinning. On May 17th, 2011, YouTuber 52Kards uploaded a pen spinning tutorial video, garnering upwards of 4.32 million views and 3,400 comments in five years (shown below).



    On December 4th, 2013, YouTuber Kuma Films posted a video titled “Epic Pen Spinning,” featuring two young men spinning pens outdoors . Within three years, the video gained over six million views and 4,600 comments. On November 25th, 2014, Kuma Films released footage of themselves spinning LED light pens (shown below, right). Within two years, the video accumulated more than 1.3 million views and 900 comments.



    On November 7th, 2015, Redditor ChazDoge submitted a pen spinning video to the /r/oddlysatisfying[3] subreddit, where it received upwards of 7,000 votes (93% upvoted) and 470 comments prior to being archived (shown below).


    TIL pen spinning is an actual thing and not just something you do when you're bored

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]UPSBUniversal Pen Spinning Board

    [2]Reddit – /r/penspinning

    [3]Reddit – Pen Spinning Skills

    [4]Internet Archive – Geocities Pen Spinning Page

    [5]Internet Archive – Pentix


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  • 10/01/16--14:14: Rush B
  • (work in progress)

    about
    RUSH B (often accompanied by “cyka blyat” or “NO STOP”) is a common joke term to mock and poke fun at Russian gamers and their other Slav relatives
    for having poor and self-centered teamwork and online social skills, in in online multiplayer games. most prominent in Valve’s top-seller FPS game: Counter Strike:Global Offensive. which is notorious for containing an severe abundance of toxic and aggressive Russian players.

    origin
    The meme originated from the ever-popular multiplayer shooter Counter-Strike:Global offensive. in which players who either play as Terrorists or Counter Terrorists. Terrorist’s team’s task in the most popular game mode – DE or Demolition – is to destroy one of two objectives on the map A or B. using a bomb.
    While the Counter Terrorists task is to defend said sites by preventing the bomb to be planted for 3 minutes or diffuse the bomb if it has been planted.

    A popular team strategy which inexperienced players tried to practice is to rush the B objective as soon as the match starts.

    While the Counter-Strike games have existed for over a decade, the major influx of Russian players, many of which have little to no knowledge of the English language, thick accents, toxic behavior – happened when Global Offensive was released to steam.
    This infamous strategy has since been associated with bad Russian players, who claim that they know best and should be trusted. often, if not always leading the team to a crushing defeat. instantly followed by a torrent of Russian profanities

    Rush B, has since become a running joke in the CS:GO community and later, spilled over other multiplayer games which happens to have many russian players.
    The phrase became the basis of many jokes, images and videos. and is commonly used to poke fun and taunt russian players

    the exact original date, or video of which the phrase was first used in an ironic matter is currently unknown but instances of this meme have never been spotted before CS:GO was released

    usage

    The phrase is mostly used in online chat, to mock players of Russian origin in online games.
    often when a player speaks russian in an english-speaking server, it is common to reply with jokes like “rush B cyka” (“cyka” pronounced as “Sooka” the russian word for ‘bitch’)
    or alternatively they would say “no we dont rush B!”

    Other times players may say the phrase when they wish to pretend being Russian, in order to grief, troll, or make funny gameplay footage,
    this is one example among many:

    And finally. the meme became infamous enough to spill out of the CS:GO community and can be found in other multiplayer games containing an undeirable amount of russians and/or toxic players – many of which do not have A B or even C objectives:


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  • 10/01/16--20:14: Dank Ass Sandboarding Son
  • work in progress


    About

    Dank Ass Sandboarding Son refers to a series of remixes featuring a man sandboarding on a madeshift sled while thumbing up. Originally uploaded on 2008, the video became a popular source of remixes on Vine and Tumblr communities in late 2014.

    Origin

    A video entitled “Dank ass sandboarding son” was published in 2008 on YouTube.com. The video features men sliding down the Nambia sand dunes on makeshift sleds while music plays in the background. They measure the speed of a sandboarding run to be 69 MPH with a radar gun


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