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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 09/03/16--19:25: Eat Your Hamburgers Apollo


  • About

    Eat Your Hamburgers Apollo is a phrase originating from a panel of the Awkward Zombie webcomic , based on the video game franchise Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney. The phrase is often used by fans of the series in order to poke fun at the more awkward parts of the series’ localisation, as well as other poor localisations for other series.

    History

    The original phrase first stems from the Awkward Zombie webcomic[1] by Katie Tiedrich, in particular the strip “Culture Schlock” (Shown below), first posted on December 9th, 2013[2]. Within the strip, the character of Phoenix Wright is seen discussing the beauty of Los Angeles, juxtaposed against images of traditional Japanese settings, with Apollo Justice pointing out the inconsistencies. This is in reference to the many inconsistencies within the Phoenix Wright franchise’s localisation in which, despite being set in Los Angeles, the series features many traditional Japanese settings and styles.



    Japanifornia

    A precursor to this meme lies in the popular fan nickname given to the setting of the translated Phoenix Wright games, “Japanifornia”, a portmanteau of “Japan” and “California”, referencing the disconnect between the supposed setting and it’s more Japanese elements present from the original version. The name grew in popularity among the fandom, and is often used in conjunction with the Awkward Zombie panel.



    Spread

    The phrase “Eat Your Hamburgers Apollo” quickly grew in popularity, particularly in reference to different awkward translations both in the Phoenix Wright franchise and other series, such as with the Fire Emblem Fates Localization Controversy. One other popular example of this features the original strip, edited to reflect the typical localisations given by different video game publishers, who often work with Japanese properties (shown below).



    On April 22, 2014, a spin-off to the Ace Attorney Franchise titled The Great Ace Attorney was announced[3], focusing on Phoenix Wright’s ancestor in Meiji era Japan. Due to the overtly Japanese nature of the spin-off, the phrase was often used in conjunction with the announcement, with many joking as to whether or not it would be possible to localise the game due to this fact. The game was released in Japan on July 9, 2015, and there are currently no plans for localisation[4].



    Search Interest



    External References


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  • 09/04/16--09:56: Jeffy
  • Jeffy is a very controversial character in the SuperMarioLogan series. The Character was first introduced in the SML episode “Mario The Babysitter!”.


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    Replaced With / Nutshack Edits are either footage from “The Nutshack” and putting it with something else each time they say a word, (E.G: Every time they say “Nutshack,” The Trololo Song plays." or just putting two things together. (E.G: Steven Universe – Here Comes a Thought, but the butterflies are replaced with the Sid the Science Kid theme.)

    Its origin is unknown.

    On September 2nd, 2016, Facebook poster Fresh Paleomemes made a post with the description “The Nutshack theme but instead of saying nutshack it’s the entire Walking with Dinosaurs intro.” To this day, the post gained 249 views, 1 share and 3 comments. This post was shared among another user named Frankie Lee Reynolds, who made a bridge to the video that was “It’s the Nutshack Intro but everytime they say Nutshack, it plays another Nutshack Intro over it.”


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  • 09/04/16--22:09: Dorbees
  • Dorbees is a failed Christian television pilot made by The Gaithers in 1998. They are the ones who also made Gaither’s Pond. The only episode, deemed “Making Decisions,” featured the plot of the show, which is jumbled and split into multiple segments. It features the tiny balls named Jack and Mary Jane who skip school and go to a haunted house to prove that they’re adults. Then, a foreign man named Otto who is looking for clothes must make a deal with 70’s buisiness man Dig for making a decision to have a friend or a profit. There are multiple songs included, such as the infamous “I Wanna Be Grown Up.”

    On December 22nd, 2015, YouTuber Grimy Ghost! uploaded a video called “BALLSJUSTWANNAGROW UP.” The spread began rapidly among others and then got a slowdown.

    On August 24th, 2016, YouTube Movie/Television Show reviewer TheMysteriousMrEnter showcased Dorbees in his ongoing series “Animated Atrocities.”


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  • 08/28/16--22:01: Juan Gabriel
  • About
    Juan Gabriel was the artistic name of Alberto Valadez Martínez, and one of the singers and composers most prolific of México. His death become a trending topic, and was missed for most of the music industry of Latinamerica.

    Online History
    : What notable things have they done online?
    Reputation
    What are they known for?
    Related Memes
    When applicable.
    Personal Life
    What are they best known for outside of the internet?
    Search Interest
    External References

    [in development]


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  • 09/02/16--10:44: Hang In There, Baby
  • About

    Hang In There, Baby refers to a motivational poster of a cat hanging on to a bar captioned “Hang in there, baby.” It has been widely imitated, parodied, and recognized as a relic from the 1970s.[1] In the 2000s, it has come to serve as a symbol of corporate coldness.[5]

    Origin

    The original “Hang In There, Baby” poster (shown below) was published in late 1971 by photographer Victor Baldwin. He got the shot of his Siamese cat, Sassy, in 1963, and published the image in a book called Outcast Kittens in 1970. He made the poster after choosing the caption “Hang in there, baby” in 1971.



    Spread

    After The Music Man composer Meredith Wilson purchased the first copy of the poster, demand quickly increased over the 1970s. People were drawn to the poster’s inspirational message and wrote Baldwin describing how it helped them get through surgeries, accidents, and other tough periods in life.

    During the 70s, dozens of imitators, bootlegs, and variations appeared with different cats and different texts, but the general idea of a cat hanging to a branch with text saying “hang in there” grew into a popular trend. Baldwin, who owned the copyright to the picture and poster, sued every imitator and won. It is now a collectible and considered one of the first motivational posters.

    Pop Culture References

    The popularity of the “Hang In There” cat has made it a ubiquitous reference in pop culture. It appeared in the Simpsons episode “The Twisted World of Marge Simpson,” where Marge commented, “‘Hang in there, baby!’ You said it, kitty…Copyright 1968. Hmm, determined or not, that cat must be long dead.” It also appeared in a Terminator film, on a Survivor episode, the 2003 film The Cat in the Hat, and more.[1] In 1999, The Onion[3] posted a headline declaring the cat had died after hanging on the branch for 17 years.

    Online Presence

    “Hang In There, Baby” is cited as one of the more prominent precursors to LOLcats, and there are several LOLcat images devoted to a cat hanging off a tree branch.[2] Pleated Jeans[4] wrote a satirical article from the perspective of the Hang In There cat. Happyjar[6] used it in a webcomic with its popular character Business Cat (shown below).



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 09/06/16--02:34: I have crippling depression
  • A video uploaded by idubbz on youtube of him jumping of a car into a wheelchair saying “I have crippling depression”. The video was about pokemon go but the crippling depression part is the most famous. The video has since received over 1.5 million views and there have been many spinoffs of the meme.


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  • 09/06/16--08:47: #HowToConfuseAMillennial
  • About

    #HowToConfuseAMillennial is a hashtag that was originally created by Boomers and Generation X-ers to mock Millennials but was quickly overrun by Millennial Twitter users mocking how their ancestors are out of touch with the Millennial generation.

    Origin

    At 9:00 AM EST on September 4th, 2016, the Twitter account for a site specializing in hashtag games, @HashtagRoundup,[1] posted the first tweet with the hashtag #HowToConfuseaMillennial (shown below).



    Spread

    Initial tweets using the hashtag gently ribbed millennials with jokes about their inability to understand old technology like maps (below, left) and landline phones (below, right).



    Once Millennial Twitter users caught wind of the hashtag, they used it to bash the generations before them, highlighting the economic difficulties Millennials face due to the mistakes of previous generations. These tweets were very popular, and soon became the dominant content under the “#HowToConfuseMillennials” hashtag. For example, one tweet by @TVsCarlKinsella,[2] shown below, gained over 24,000 retweets and 36,000 likes in two days.



    The popularity of the hashtag made it a Twitter moment[3] and a news story on Buzzfeed,[4]BBC,[5] Mashable,[6] Uproxx,[7] and more.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    Unavailable

    External References


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  • 09/06/16--09:54: Frustrated Florida State Dad
  • About

    Frustrated Florida State Dad and FSU Dad are nicknames given to a solemn-looking man who was recorded during a football game between the Florida State Seminoles and the Ole Miss Rebels in early September 2016, leading Twitter users to post humorous captions musing about the cause of his disappointed facial expression.

    Origin

    During ESPN’s broadcast of a Seminoles vs. Ole Miss footbal game held on September 5th, 2016, an unknown FSU Seminoles fan was recorded in the audience appearing forlorn over his team’s performance (shown below, left). Immediately after he was filmed, Twitter user @MarkEnnis[2] posted a screen capture of the man with the caption “FSU dad is not mad, he’s just disappointed,” gathering upwards of 400 likes and 290 retweets in 24 hours (shown below, right).



    Spread

    Shortly after, Twitter user @UncleChaps[1] posted a screen capture of the FSU fan with the caption “When you see Colin Kaepernick sitting during the anthem“ (shown below). Within 24 hours, the tweet gained over 530 likes and 180 retweets.



    That evening, many other Twitter users tweeted the image along with various humorous captions describing disappointing or frustrating scenarios (shown below). In the coming days, several news sites published articles about the meme, including, Fox Sports,[3]USA Today,[4] Larry Brown Sports,[5] Fansided[6] and UpRoxx.[7]



    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References


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  • 09/06/16--11:02: Toothpaste For Dinner
  • About

    Toothpaste for Dinner is a webcomic created by Drew Fairweather. It is characterized by its crude art style, single panel comics, and dark, cynical sense of humor.

    Origin

    Toothpaste For Dinner launched on January 1st, 2002,[1] and has updated every day since.



    One of the earliest Toothpaste For Dinner comics.[2]

    Spread

    Toothpaste For Dinner grew popular over the next few years as Fairweather and his wife Natalie Dee became successful web cartoonists.[3] Both Slate[4] and PC Magazine[5] praised the comic in the mid 2000s. Since 2010, the comic has been drawn by contractors. The comic has been on Tumblr[6] since June of 2012.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External Links


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  • 09/06/16--11:49: #HackingHillary
  • About

    #HackingHillary is a hashtag launched by critics of Hillary Clinton to mock her frequent coughing fits, which many have speculated are signs of the 2016 Democratic presidential candidate’s failing health.

    Origin

    During a rally in Cleveland, Ohio held on September 5th, 2016, Clinton began coughing repeatedly while delivering a speech, during which she joked “Every time I think about Trump, I get allergic” (shown below, left). Later that day, the Fox 10 Phoenix news station posted footage of Clinton having a similar coughing fit while being interviewed on a plane (shown below, right).



    Precursors

    On February 16th, YouTuber Shelly Dankert uploaded a video montage featuring various clips of Clinton coughing (shown below).



    On August 10th, Breitbart[1] reported that the executive director of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons speculated that Clinton was unfit for office based on media circulating on the internet, in which the presidential candidate appears confused and makes “strange head movements.” Additionally, Orient used the hashtag #hillaryhealth when expressing concerns that Clinton may be suffering from an “organic brain syndrome.”

    “There are some very concerning things on Twitter #hillaryhealth. For example, that she naps at 5 p.m. and can’t be aroused, or that her Mini-Mental State exam – which you use to screen patients who might have an organic brain syndrome – has deteriorated since 2013.”

    On August 26th, the Rebel Media YouTube channel uploaded a video titled “Hillary’s Heath,” which questioned Clinton’s health based on videos of her coughing and shaking her head erratically (shown below).



    Spread

    After the footage of Clinton’s coughing fits began circulating on September 5th, 2016, the hashtag #HackingHillary[2] became the top trending topic on Twitter in the United States, where many of her critics questioned the presidential candidate’s health (shown below).



    The following day, The American Mirror[3] published an article highlighting earlier videos of Clinton coughing on camera. Also on September 6th, the #HackingHillary became a trending topic on Facebook. In the coming days, several news sites published articles about the hashtag, including Mediaite,[4] The Next Web[5] and The Daily Dot.[6]

    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References


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  • 09/06/16--16:20: Red Truck
  • People are watching this live youtube feed of a tourist town in Wyoming
    Everyone thinks it’s in Ukraine
    We love the red truck
    REDTRUCK


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  • 09/06/16--18:01: 8 grand ma
  • 8 GRAND MA Was Created By User https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGiGBF0wRHqly975BzfnCHA on June 26 and Made It from SiIvagunner lore. Then on august 22nd [RootSlime] Vinny Reaction to 8 GRAND MA was uploaded making the original unlisted.


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  • 09/07/16--10:00: Exurb1a
  • About

    Exurb1a is a YouTuber known for creating videos exploring a wide variety of topics in science and philosophy, including the singularity, transhumanism and simulated reality.

    Online History

    YouTube Channel

    On September 27th, 2013, Exurb1a uploaded the first video to his YouTube channel, in which he explains scientific explanations of time travel along with a series of illustrations (shown below, left). On May 12th, 2014, a video titled “Oh hello, you’re alive” was uploaded to the channel, featuring a monologue describing various philosophical musings held over the course of a lifetime (shown below, right). Within three years, the video gained over 620,000 views and 600 comments.



    On March 3rd, 2015, a video discussing the likelihood that the universe is a simulated reality concept was released (shown below, left). On February 8th, 2016, Exurb1a posted a video titled “Humanity: Good Ending,” featuring a speculative timeline for the future of humanity, exploring concepts related to transhumanism (shown below, right)



    On May 15th, a skit in featuring various blunt, plain-spoken interactions between people flirting at a bar titled “How Casual Sex Should Work” was posted to the channel. Within four months, the video received upwards of 2.04 million views and 1,300 comments. On May 23rd, a video titled “The Universe in 4 Minutes” was uploaded to the channel, which humorously describes a variety of concepts in theoretical physics (shown below, right). Over the next several months, the video gathered more than 1.7 million views and 3,500 comments.



    Social Media Presence

    In March 2016, the @Exurb1a[1] Twitter feed was launched. On March 5th, the /r/Exurb1a subreddit was created for discussions about the YouTube channel. The following day, the official Exurb1a Facebook page was launched. Within six months, the Twitter feed accumulated more than 4,200 followers, the Facebook gained over 3,900 likes and the subreddit received upwards of 1,700 subscribers. In April, he created a Patreon[2] page to support his YouTube channel, which gathered 254 patrons within five months. On May 11th, the site Exurb1a.com[4] was launched, highlighting his YouTube videos and social media feeds.

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Twitter – @Exurb1a

    [2]Patreon – exurb1a is creating philosophy awkwardness and dick jokes

    [3]Reddit – /r/Exurb1a

    [4]Exurb1a.com – Exurb1a

    [5]Facebook – Exurb1a


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  • 09/07/16--10:23: Kars4Kids Jingle
  • About

    The Kars4Kids Jingle, also known as “1-877-Kars-4-Kids,” is a song that plays during radio and television commercials for the non-profit organization Kars4Kids. It is widely known as one of the most despised jingles of all time.

    Origin

    Kars4Kids is a non-profit organization that began in 1995.[1] It takes donations of cars and donates the proceeds to Oorah, an Orthodox Jewish organization dedicated to “awakening Jewish children and families to their heritage.” The jingle, which features a child singing the agency’s telephone number, first appeared on local New York City radio stations in 1999.[2]



    Spread

    The original jingle was so hated that Kars4Kids keeps the singer’s names under wraps due to the fact he has received death threats. Kars4Kids stayed in New York until 2004, when it expanded to Chicago. It reached west coast audiences in 2005, and by 2007, was all over the country. Kars4Kids Public Relations director Wendy Kiran told Noisey in 2015 that the song currently reaches 50 million listeners daily. In 2014, Kars 4 Kids released a 30-second television commercial.



    Backlash

    The jingle is almost universally hated. Noisey jokingly stated, “It’s one of the few issues that transcends race, gender, and class. Were a Presidential candidate to run for office on the promise that they would ban the jingle and waterboard the people responsible, they’d win in a landslide.”

    Critics of the jingle include Jerry Seinfeld,[3] Keith Olbermann,[4] and Bill O’Reilly. Radio host Don Imus notably was caught on a hot mic deriding the commercial as it played on air, telling the kids to “go to hell” in 2010.[5]

    Following the release of the television commercial, Vulture[6] commented that its existence proved the end times were nigh. Later that year, Saturday Night Live[9] joked about the jingle in a sketch discussing CIA torture techniques.



    Kars4Kids Sock Puppets

    Aware of the negative reaction their jingle draws, Kars4Kids has taken to trolling its critics on its YouTube channel[7] with videos featuring overly nice sock puppets. For example, after Buzzfeed writer Katie Notopolous tweeted,[8]“Today is Thursday morning. Day 4 of the KARS-4-KIDS jingle stuck in my head. I pray for a swift and painless death,” the Kars4Kids Youtube channel tweeted her the below video of the sock puppets singing, “There’s a jingle stuck in Katie’s head, and now she wishes that she were dead.”



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 09/07/16--12:16: Horse Algebra Question
  • About

    The Horse Algebra Question refers to a picture of an algebraic equation featuring horses, horseshoes and boots. Despite the ostensible simplicity of the equation, people have reached many different answers, sparking the picture’s spread.

    Origin

    On February 17th, 2016, the Facebook page for Horse.com[5] uploaded the picture. It has over 2,600 reactions as of September 7th, 2016.



    Spread

    On August 17th, 2016, Facebook user Nejib Tej reuploaded the picture.[1] As of September 7th, 2016, it has over 76,000 reactions and nearly 14,000 shares.

    The problem grew in popularity to the point where both Mashable,[2] Daily Mail,[6] and Daily Dot[3] covered the internet’s frustration with it. The Youtube channel MindYourDecisions[4] posted a video on September 7th explaining the problem.



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 09/07/16--13:00: Mr. Orange
  • About

    Mr. Orange, also known as Orang Min, is a digital illustration of an anthropomorphic orange, which is often used as a reaction image in ironic meme communities online.

    Origin



    On July 5th, 2006, user jit_gohil posted a thread to the forum “ZBrush Central”, a forum for the digital sculpting tool. The thread was titled “Beware the Orangeman”, and was a user showing off Mr. Orange or Orangeman, gaining 17 replies. [1]

    Spread

    On May 27th, 2015, the image was submitted in a post titled “[Esoteric Meme] [Funny] Silly Orange Man xD” to the /r/4ChanMeta[6] subreddit. On July 4th, YouTuber Cyranek uploaded a Brodyquest parody video titled “Memequest,” in which the orange character walks through various internet meme scenes (shown below). Within two years, the video received upwards of 400,000 views and 1,400 comments.



    On December 12th, Redditor BasicallyADoctor posted the image with the “If You See This Image“-style caption “Greetings my compatriots you are being visited our god friend mr orage / leave a like or you will fail the inspection” to /r/dankmemes,[9] where it received upwards of 1,600 votes (99% upvoted) prior to being archived (shown below). On December 22nd, the @dank__memes[3] Instagram feed posted the same captioned image. On January 5th, 2016, Redditor Ozone_Teumpus resubmitted the image in a post titled “Bernie Sanders announces Guy Fieri as VP” on /r/circlejerk.[8] On July 5th, the @dank__memes[2] Instagram page reposted the image.



    That month, posts referring to the illustration as “Orang Min” began appearing on the internet humor site iFunny.[5] On September 7th, Redditor Snoot_Boot submitted a post asking about the character to /r/OutOfTheLoop,[7] where Redditor DimensioX mentioned the /r/ooerintensifies post.



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]ZBrush Central – Beware the Orange Man

    [2]Instagram – @dank__memes

    [3]Instagram – @dank__memes

    [4]iFunny – it is min my dudes

    [5]iFunny – #orangmin

    [6]Reddit – Silly Orange Man

    [7]Reddit – /r/OutOfTheLoop

    [8]Reddit – Bernie Sanders announces Guy Fieri as VP

    [9]Reddit – woah


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  • 09/08/16--00:04: Make It Stranger
  • W.I.P.

    About

    Make it Stranger is the website address of the Stranger Things Type Generator, an unofficial word generator created by the creative studio Nelson Cash. The site allows users to make their own words into the font akin to the eerie artistic style of the Stranger Things logo.

    Origin

    Michael Millan is the creator of the Stranger Things Type Generator from Nelson Cash. A blog post analyzing the typography of the Stranger Things Title by Nelson Cash was said to be the inspiration for making the generator.

    Spread

    Michael Millan has revealed over Twitter that about 11,000 unique submissions have been sent into the generator.

    Notable Examples



    Search Interest




    External References


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  • 09/08/16--07:49: Nose Twerking
  • About

    Nose Twerking is a video fad featuring people drawing a female behind on their nose and making it move with their finger as if it was twerking. It soon became a viral sensation in the first half of 2016, leading to many people following suit on various social sites such as Vine and YouTube.

    Origin

    On May 12th, 2016, Filipina Facebook user Meg Mallari Perez uploaded a short video of herself with her nose drawn to look like a woman’s behind and making it appear as if it was twerking to Rihanna’s 2016 hit song Work using her finger[4] (YouTube upload from her account shown below).



    The video quickly spread in popularity, accumulating to over 710,000 views in the first five months of its upload.

    Precursor

    On June 10th, 2014, Twitter user ‏@DannyKrazeWbu posted a close-up photograph of Christopher Poole, a.k.a Moot with the comment “This guys nose looks like a girl twerking”[1] (shown below, left). Several months later, in September 2014, the full photograph with the same reference to his nose looking like a woman twerking was uploaded to Imgur, leading to the creation of a GIF animation[2] (shown below, right).



    Spread

    On May 13th, Perez’ video was shared to the official Philippines Rihanna page on Facebook. There, it gained more than 32 million views in its first five months.[3] The video sparked enough imitators that in a week, the trend was picked up by The Daily Mail,[8] Buzzfeed,[5] Mashable,[6] Huffington Post,[7] and more.

    Various Examples




    Search Interest



    External References


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  • 09/08/16--08:32: Sandy Is Dead
  • About

    “Sandy Is Dead” is a fan theory surrounding the 1978 American musical film Grease which posits that the female protagonist Sandy Olsson had been dead throughout the entire movie and the rest of the plot follows a coma-induced fantasy of a dying woman.

    Origin

    On April 25th, 2013, Reddit user atomicbolt submitted the theory in a thread titled “A theory on the ending of ‘Grease’.”[1] In an image (shown below), atomicbolt posited that Sandy drowned before the events of the film took place, and the film is the comatose fantasy of a dying girl that culminates in her and boyfriend Danny Zuko flying in a car off to heaven. As of September 8th, 2016, the thread has 1503 points, 80% upvotes, and 132 comments.



    Spread

    The theory’s spread remained relatively tame, appearing in roundups of strange and alternative fan theories on sites like MentalFloss[3] and Entertainment Weekly,[4] until September 7th, 2016, when actress Sarah Michelle Gellar explained the theory to her followers on Facebook. [2] As of September 8th, her post, shown below, has nearly 10,000 reactions and over 2,000 shares.



    The theory then began receiving mainstream attention, as sites including DailyMail,[5] Entertainment Tonight,[6]NME,[7] New York Daily News,[8] and more. The theory was a trending topic on Facebook on September 8th.[9]

    Search Interest

    External References

    [9]Facebook – grease fan theory danny sandy


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