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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 08/18/16--10:35: Says Who?
  • About

    Says Who? refers to a series of jokes mocking Michael Cohen, lawyer and spokesperson for Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, after he responded to CNN’s Brianna Keilar telling him Trump was losing in all the polls with “Says who?”

    Origin

    On Wednesday, August 17th, 2016, Cohen appeared on CNN’s The Situation Room to address a recent shakeup in the Trump campaign staff. Host Brianna Keilar observed “You guys are down,” to which Cohen interrupted, “Says who?” Keilar responded “Polls. Most of them. All of them?” After a long pause, Cohen repeated, “Says who?”, sparking the spread of the joke.



    Spread

    The Twitter account for CNN’s The Situation Room, “@CNNSitRoom”[1] tweeted the video of Cohen’s interview at 5:38 PM that day. Shortly after, Twitter users began tweeting jokes and spamming Cohen’s Twitter account with “Says Who?”[2] By the end of the day, the “Says Who?” phenomenon became a Twitter moment.[3] A large number of major news outlets covered the story and the spread of the meme, including The Daily Dot,[4] Wired,[5] Vox,[6] Gawker,[7], and New York Magazine.[8]

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 08/18/16--10:58: Mingyu At the Swimming Pool
  • Mingyu At the Swimming Pool is a k-pop meme about a member of the boy group SEVENTEEN that originated from a series of tweets posted on the official Twitter account of the group. In the tweets, it shows multiple pictures of one of the members, rapper Kim Mingyu, who was posing at a swimming pool in Singapore during their Shining Diamond Asia Tour on around August 12, 2016 to August 18, 2016. Mingyu posed in a total of six different photos, dressed in swimming trunks, tank top and a flowery swimming cap. The tweet garnered a total of 23 000+ retweets and 34 000+ likes over a period of four days. After the first tweet was posted with two photos of him (one of him doing a half-lunge and another of him standing ankle-deep in the shallow end of the pool), fans of SEVENTEEN, also known as Carats, began to superimpose Mingyu’s poses and face onto various pictures and GIFs, such as on the edge of a cliff and in a yoga class. A few days later on August 18, Mingyu tweeted from the official account that he had seen some of the fan-made edits, and posted four more pictures of himself in the same pool, this time leaning over the edge of the pool with his arms out, sitting on the edge of the pool, lowering one of his feet into the pool and peeking out of the water while submerged, all while still wearing the same outfit, which got 19 000 retweets and 26 000+ likes within six hours. A third tweet was also posted almost immediately after with Mingyu sitting on the edge of the pool, which resulted in 16 000+ retweets and 23 000+ likes. These pictures of Mingyu were also Photoshopped into other pictures (such as on a diving board in the 2012 London Summer Olympics and in a screenshot of Korean singer/songwriter PSY’s music video, Gangnam Style). By this time, other non-Carat members of the k-pop fandom began to notice the trend and started posting edits of their own, making Mingyu At the Swimming Pool a popular k-pop trend on Twitter and Instagram.

    EXAMPLES:

    (cr: @pledis_17)

    (cr: @scoups88)

    (cr: @pledis_17)

    (cr: @MooooocciR)

    LINKS:

    The first tweet with Mingyu’s photos at @pledis_17 (captions in Korean only): Here
    Mingyu’s tweet stating he saw some of the edits (in Korean): Here"
    The second tweet with three more photos (captions in Korean only): Here
    The third tweet with two photos (captions in Korean only): Here


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  • 08/18/16--12:48: Buff Riku
  • About

    Buff Riku refers to a fan illustration of the character Riku from the video game series Kingdom Hearts drawn with enormous bulging muscles. The fan art was popularized by the Games Repainted video game stream, who began placing the image on modified video game textures in March 2015.

    Origin

    On July 7th, 2008, artist O’Melissokomos uploaded an illustration of a very muscular version of the Kingdom Hearts character Riku to the Choose Your Own Change[6] database (shown below).



    Spread

    In March 2015, the video game streamers Games Repainted broadcast themselves playing the 2002 Nintendo Gamecube video game Super Mario Sunshine, which included the Buff Riku illustration edited on to various textures in the game (shown below).



    On May 13th, 2015, the Buff Riku Wiki was created.[2] On June 2nd, Tumblr user masked-paradox[5] posted a Feel Old Yet? image macro comparing a normal Riku illustration to the Buff Riku drawing (shown below, left). On July 18th, DeviantArtist NegitiveX[4] uploaded a four-pane comic titled “Buff Riku in Darkest Dungeon” (shown below, right).



    On November 12th, Tumblr user itsfredfuchs[1] posted a video featuring a parody version of “The Star-Spangled Banner” replaced with lyrics repeating the name “Buff Riku.” On January 2nd, 2016, YouTuber The Society of Intellectual Hebrews V2 uploaded the Buff Riku illustration with the “Hallelujah Chorus” from the oratorio Messiah Part II by George Frideric Handel playing in the background (shown below).



    In February 2016, the @BuffRiku[7] Twitter feed was created, featuring tweets written from the perspective of the fan illustration. On May 24th, 2016, the Games-Repainted Tumblr[3] answered a question asking about the backstory of the Buff Riku drawing, claiming that it was found during a search for “buff Kingdom Hearts characters.”

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Tumblr – Buff Riku Star Spangled Banner

    [2]Wikia – Buff Riku

    [3]Tumblr – Games-Repainted

    [4]DeviantArt – NegitiveX

    [5]Tumblr – masked-paradox

    [6]CYOCRiku Kingdom Hearts

    [7]Twitter – @BuffRiku


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  • 08/18/16--13:48: Cher
  • About

    Cher (born Cherilyn Sarkisian) is an American actress and singer (born May 20th, 1946). She has had an extensive career both on screen and in the studio, and has won an Emmy, Academy Award, Grammy, and several Golden Globes. In the 21st Century, she has remained in the public eye thanks in large to her eccentric Twitter account, where her idiosyncratic way of typing with all capital letters, shoddy spelling, and emojis have made her extremely popular on the microblogging website.

    Career

    Cher first reached public attention in 1965 as one half of the folk-rock husband-and-wife duo Sonny & Cher when their song “I Got You Babe” reached number 1 in America and England.[1] Despite a rocky relationship with soon-to-be-ex-husband Sonny Bono, Cher continued her music career through the 1960s and 1970s. During the late 1970s, Cher broke through on television with The Sonny & Cher Comedy Hour and musically experimented with disco. However, by the late 70s, her popularity was declining. In the 1980s, Cher returned to a more rock-based sound and began a successful acting career. In the 80s, she starred in films including The Witches of Eastwick (below, left), Mask, Silkwood, and Moonstruck (below, right), for which she won the Academy Award for best actress.



    In the late 80s, Cher had become a bonafide movie star, and returned to music with the smash hit “If I Could Turn Back Time” (below Left) in 1989. She did not have a hit of the same level until 1998, when she released her album Believe. The title-track of that album (below, right) became one of her all-time most popular hits.



    Online Presence

    Cher is extremely popular on social media, with over 2 million Facebook[2] likes and 360 thousand Instagram[3] followers.

    Twitter Presence

    Cher’s Twitter[4] has proven her most popular social media account. She has 3.11 million followers as of August 18th, 2016. Her idiosyncratic mix of disregarded grammar, outspokenness, caps-lock tweets, emojis, and left-leaning politics have captured the attention of Twitter users.



    Cher’s Twitter has been celebrated by The New York Times,[5] who commended Cher as “perhaps the last unreconstructed high-profile Twitter user to stand at her digital pulpit and yell (somewhat) incomprehensibly, and be rewarded for it.” Buzzfeed[6][8] has written several times about Cher’s tweets, once calling every one a “small masterpiece.” The Huffington Post[7] compiled a list of times Cher “dragged” Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump on Twitter. Other publications that have written about Cher’s tweets include Harper’s Bazaar,[9] Complex,[10]NME,[11] Gawker,[12] Elle,[13] and many more. The Daily Dot[14] declared Cher “the best person on Twitter.”

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 08/18/16--14:27: Sinnoh Confirmed
  • About

    “Sinnoh Confirmed” Is a catchphrase associated with fan speculations and hoaxes about a possible remake of Nintendo’s Pokémon Generation IV video games Diamond Version and Pearl Version, both of which are set in the Sinnoh region. It is used similarly to Half-Life 3 Confirmed.

    Origin

    Pokémon Diamond and Pokémon Pearl were released in September 2006 in Japan and throughout 2007 for the rest of the world, marking the launch of the fourth generation of Pokémon video games. The belief that there will be remakes of these games stems from the fact that there had been remakes of the Pokemon generations prior to Diamond and Pearl. Because the remakes of Generation I were released during the Generation III, Generation II during the Generation IV, and Generation III during the Generation V games, many fans believe that Generation IV would be revived during Generation VI. This lead to certain fans looking for details in the Generation VI titles that would hint at a remake of the Generation IV games. Amidst intense speculations on Pokémon fan forums, “Sinnoh confirmed” became a tongue-in-cheek way of mocking these believers.

    Spread

    After the launch of Pokémon Omega Ruby and Pokémon Alpha Sapphire, the meme rose to some popularity, seeing that rumors had been confirmed of the Hoenn region getting a remake, many fans began to look for hope that there may be a remake of the Generation IV games. It has spread on several social media platforms and websites, such as Reddit [1], Tumblr [2], and Twitter [3].

    Notable Examples

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Reddit – Sinnoh confirmed!!

    [2]Tumblr – Sinnoh Confirmed Tag

    [3]Twitter – Sinnoh Confirmed Hashtag


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    This entry contains spoilers for the Pokémon anime series.
    Currently a work in progress.


    Overview

    Ash’s Kalos League Controversy refers to fandom reaction to a recent episode of the Pokémon anime series in which protagonist Ash Ketchum (or Satoshi in the original Japanese version) reached the finals of a significant tournament and failed to win.

    Background

    The event was notable in spite of having occured many times previously in the series because of several breaks in the usual formula. This time around, Ash reached the final of the tournament, which had not occured prior to the “XY&Z” arc of the series. He had a more typically “powerful” team featuring popular Pokémon from the recent games, and a member of his team, Greninja, gained a special form. Additionally, many other previous series traditions had been broken this time, and the next games in the video game franchise on which the series is loosely based, Sun and Moon, will not feature a typical Pokémon league. This led many fans to speculate that Ash would finally achieve his goal of winning the Pokémon league before the series moves on to follow the next set of games.

    The series built towards the league tournament’s climax which would be resolved in the 131st episode (of the XY series only). The Japanese episode title for this episode was revealed ahead of its airing as “Kalos League Victory! Satoshi’s Ultimate Match!!” which fueled speculation yet further due to use of the word “victory” and the allusion to the fact that thus far, this is Ash’s greatest progress in the league tournament. Ash was set up to meet new character Alain, popular in his own right for being a different kind of character to the more typically “shonen hero” style of character in Ash.

    Notable Developments

    The episode aired on the Japanese network TV Tokyo on August 18, 2016. Bulbapedia summarised the events of the episode on their website, referring to the episode as “XY131” in accordance with their reference system, noting first and foremost:[1]

    The Full Battle between Ash and Alain ends in Alain’s victory, making him the winner of the Lumiose Conference and Pokémon Champion.

    The episode received negative reactions across Pokémon-related fan sites, including r/Pokemon,[2] where one user decryed the writing:

    Ash is probably the only main character that will never win because of motherfucking plot armor

    The comment received around 600 upvotes within 10 hours.

    Discussion on popular Pokémon fansite Serebii.net featured a thread querying the reaction of Japanese fans compared with Western fans. Repliers agreed that reaction was negative on both sides of the world.[3]

    Promotional videos for the episode on YouTube garnered a high ratio of “dislikes” on the Japanese web. One video managed to gain over 18,000 disliked compared to a measly 400 likes.[4]


    Reactions on Twitter were mixed, and saw much discussion under the hashtag #KalosLeagueFinals.[5] 4chan’s dedicated Pokémon board, /vp/, also reacted strongly with a mix of negativity but also the usual trolling and shitposting.


    Some /vp/ reactions to the episode as seen on August 18 2016.


    Search Interest



    Search interest for “ash kalos league win” shows a spike over mid-2016 running up to the airing of XY131.


    External References


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  • 08/18/16--21:06: MemeSaysStuff
  • He makes YouTube videos in the commentary genre whilst using the Meme/character fsjal. Not much is known about him, except that he hasn’t shown his face publicly, but yet isn’t that hard to find. He has associated himself with various YouTubers, including LegoLeoTheKid, GR3YISBA3 and The Eternal Vanguard. He may be extremely small channel, but has helped many small YouTubers with their start on YouTube.


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  • 08/14/16--08:13: WTF I hate X now
  • About

    WTF I Hate X Now is a phrasal template expressing a sudden distaste for something or someone, which is typically used in political discussions on 4chan’s /pol/ (politically incorrect) and /int/ (international) boards.

    Origin

    The phrase is rumored to have originated on 4chan’s /pol/ board, where users would write the joke “wtf I hate Trump now #cruzmissile” during the 2016 Republican presidential primary.

    [Researching]

    Spread

    On February 28th, 2016, an anonymous /int/ user submitted the box art from the 1988 Japanese animated war drama film Grave of the Fireflies in a thread thread titled “WTF I hate America now” to the /int/ board.[1] On May 30th, a /tv/ user submitted an image of the poster for the 2014 psychological thriller film Gone Girl with the title “WTF I hate women now.”[3]

    On August 19th, 2016, Redditor kyunkyun3 submitted a question about the phrasal template to /r/OutOfTheLoop,[2] to which user TheLagginDragon replied that it was frequently used in political discussions on 4chan.

    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    “I Haven’t Heard That Name In Years” is an expression commonly paired with various images of washed-up looking subjects smoking cigarettes to portray them as if they’re trying to recollect memories of the past.

    Origin

    Prior to the internet, the image of a downtrodden figure sucking on a cigarette was popularized by noir films.[3] One of the more popular examples of the “I haven’t heard that name in a long time” cliché comes from Star Wars, when Obi-wan Kenobi is asked about his true name by Luke Skywalker.



    One of the earliest examples of “Haven’t heard that name in years” as a joke format is a tweet by @DoctorJeph,[4] who used it in a tweet making a Thomas the Tank Engine joke. The tweet, shown below, has over 27,000 retweets and 42,000 likes as of August 19th, 2016.



    Predecessor

    Crabs smoking cigarettes were the first collective instances of cigarettes in the possession of animals to be viral.

    Spread

    The meme began spreading around Twitter,[2] where the joke is most popular, after user @pooplissa[5] uploaded a picture of a smoking rat with the caption “Ratatouille? Haven’t heard that name in years.” The tweet, shown below, has over 50,000 retweets and 70,000 likes. The joke was posted without credit to /r/funny[6] where it gained 4,905 points, 80% upvotes.



    Twitter users continued to tweet variations on the joke throughout the summer of 2016, and in August 2016, both Paper Mag[1] and The Daily Dot[3] published articles investigating the gag accompanied by compilations of some notable variations.

    Various Examples





    Search Interest

    [not yet available]

    External References


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  • 08/19/16--09:18: Donald Trump's "Sad" Tweets
  • About

    Donald Trump’s “Sad” Tweets refers to 2016 Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s frequent use of the word “sad” to end messages published on his official Twitter feed.

    Origin

    On June 19th, 2015, Trump tweeted that The Today Show host Brian Williams was “very sad!” after watching an episode of the morning talk show (shown below).[7]



    Spread

    On November 13th, 2015, Trump posted a tweet criticizing Republican presidential primary rival Carly Fiorina for making “false statements” about him, ending the message with the word “sad” (shown below).



    On January 22nd, 2016, Slate[2] published a post highlighting nine Trump tweets ending with “sad!”. On March 3rd, The Washington Post[5] published a similar listicle titled “47 Things That Have Made Donald Trump ‘Sad’ Since He Launched His Campaign.” On March 20th, a Quora[6] user submitted the question “Why does Trump use ‘Sad!’ so much in his tweets?” On April 23rd, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton posted an article about Trump, ending the tweet with the word “Sad!” (shown below). Within four months, the tweet gained over 2,700 likes and 1,500 retweets.[4]



    On June 28th, Gawker[8] published an article titled “Where Are They Hiding Donald Trump’s Phone?”, which speculated that a Trump campaign staff member was running his Twitter account based on a tweet ending with the word “sad” without an exclamation point. On August 9th, data scientist David Robinson published an article on his blog Variance Explained[3] investigating which of Trump’s tweet were written by staff, which speculated that an anonymous staffer was imitating Trump’s cadence:

    “A lot has been written about Trump’s mental state. But I’d really rather get inside the head of this anonymous staffer, whose job is to imitate Trump’s unique cadence (‘Very sad!’), or to put a positive spin on it, to millions of followers.”

    On August 18th, 2016, NPR interviewed several data scientists examining Trump’s Twitter account, who mentioned the frequent usage of “sad!” at the end of his tweets.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References


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  • 08/19/16--11:44: #CoverTheAthlete
  • About

    #CoverTheAthlete is a social media campaign aimed at highlighting and combating apparent gender bias in interviews, commentaries and media coverage of female athletes in sports journalism. Originally launched in October 2015, the anti-sexist campaign saw a notable resurgence during the 2016 Summer Olympics in August 2016.

    Origin

    In October 2015, Canadian advertising executives and athletes Jessica Schnurr and Hannah Smit launched the official campaign website[3] with the hashtag banner #CoverTheAthlete,[6] which seeks to raise awareness about “sexist commentary, inappropriate interview questions and articles” focused solely on the physical appearance of female athletes. According to Schnurr, they decided to address the issue after watching a video clip of a post-game TV interview at the 2015 Australian Open tournament (shown below, left).

    On October 28th, 2015, an audio-dubbed satire video featuring a montage of male athletes looking baffled by irrelevant questions about their private lives from mock sportscasters and interviews, juxtaposed with the interview of Eugenie Bouchard at the 2015 Australian Open in which the reporter asks Canadian tennis player Eugenie Bouchard to "give a twirl and talk about her outfit. Over the next year, the video gained over 1.68 million views and 760 comments (shown below, right).



    Spread

    On November 3rd, 2015, Redditor samuraislider submitted the #CoverTheAthlete video to the /r/videos[2] subreddit, where it gathered upwards of 6,700 votes (56% upvoted) and 1,400 comments. In the comments section, many users argued about whether female athletes received more inappropriate questions than males.

    2016 Summer Olympics

    On August 14th, University of Denver law professor Nancy Leong tweeted a photograph of a headline in the The Eagle, a newspaper from Bryan-College Station, Texas, which placed a line about Michael Phelps’ tie for the silver medal in the men’s 100-meter in larger font above Katie Ledecky’s world record for the womens’ 800 freestyle. In the Twitter post, Leong captioned the image with “This headline is a metaphor for basically the entire world,” alluding that the headline choice was an example of institutional sexism. Within five days, the tweet gathered upwards of 48,800 likes and 37,900 retweets.



    In the coming days, the image was widely circulated on Twitter, with many using the hashtag #CoverTheAthlete.[7][8] Meanwhile, others countered the claim that the headline was sexist, pointing out that Phelps was likely placed above Ledecky due to his high-profile celebrity status rather than his gender (shown below).[9][10]



    On August 17th, Mashable[4] published an article titled “The Rio Olympics coverage is rife with sexism and here’s what needs to change,” followed by an article titled “The hashtag #CoverTheAthlete still very relevant in Rio, unfortunately” the next day.[5]

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 08/19/16--13:23: How It's Made
  • About

    How It’s Made is a documentary-style television show that shows how common everyday items like aluminum foil or guitars are made.

    History

    How It’s Made first aired January 6th, 2001, on The Discovery Channel in Canada and on Science in the United States.[1] It is broadcast in several different languages across the globe.

    Format

    How It’s Made is broadcast with minimal talking and and human interaction with the machines in order to simplify overdubbing in different languages. An offscreen narrator explains what happens while the camera shows machines at work. Each half hour show contains a few segments, usually lasting about 5-6 minutes each.



    Online Presence

    How It’s Made is very popular online, with over 2 million Facebook likes.[2] It’s devoted subreddit, /r/howitsmade,[3] has over 5,000 subscribers. It is also popular on the /r/oddlysatisfying subreddit.[4]

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Wikipedia – How It’s Made

    [2]Facebook – How It’s Made

    [3]Reddit – /r/howitsmade

    [4]Reddit – /r/oddlysatisfying


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  • 08/20/16--02:27: Metal Gear Survive


  • About

    Metal Gear Survive is an upcoming 4 player Co-op survival game developed by Konami for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Taking place after the events of Ground Zeroes, players take on the role of MSF soldiers who were sucked into a mysterious wormhole that sends them into an alternate dimension. Players must work together in order to survive and fight against hordes of zombies. The game gained notoriety online due to the title being the first in the series after famed Game Designer and creator of the Metal Gear series Hideo Kojima’s departure from Konami as well as for veering away from the main series’s core gameplay.

    History

    Metal Gear Survive was announced during Gamescom 2016 via IGN on August 17th, 2016.[1] According to the President of Konami Europe, Tomotada Tashiro, Metal Gear Survive "will offer a fresh take on the series’ famed stealth elements but within a unique co-op setting that is designed for a truly engrossing multiplayer experience.” On the same day, a trailer for the title was posted on the IGN Youtube channel which gathered over 2.7 million views within 3 days (shown below).


    Backlash

    Search Interest



    External Reference

    [1]IGNKonami Announces Metal Gear Survive


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    About

    is a popular fan request for the inclusion of Jimmy Neutron, the protagonist of the the Japanese manga and anime franchise Dragon Ball, in the upcoming fourth and fifth installations of Nintendo’s crossover fighting game series Super Smash Brothers (SSB). Driven by the large-scale support from the fans of both SSB and Dragon Ball, the topic has become a well-known in-joke among the fans of the game, similar to other instances of wishful SSB character predictions like “Shrek and Goku in Super Smash Bros”.

    Origin

    SSB is a fighting video game series developed by Nintendo which features a growing cast of iconic characters, including Mario, Pikachu, Donkey Kong. On July 14th, 2006, Neoseeker Forums[1] member guilmon93950 submitted a thread titled “Should They Include Jimmy Neutron?” in the “Super Smash Bros. Brawl” board, receiving over 60 replies before it was closed 72 hours later.

    Spread

    on Jul 24, 2014 a video called “Super Smash Bros. Wii U & 3DS – Jimmy Neutron Announcement Trailer (HD)” was uploaded by Gameradioativo (Shown Below).




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    About

    • “Richard Dawkins is a biologist known for his books The Selfish Gene and The God Delusion.
    • He is also credited for coining the word meme.
    • However, Tumblr generally seems to have rather negative views on him, especially due to his militant atheism and criticism of religion.
    • As a means to poke fun at him, the Richard Dawkins shirt meme involves editing a photo of Richard Dawkins wearing a shirt that states, “We Are All Africans” so that it states something else instead, usually something humorous, random, and/or absurd."
      - memedocumentation.tumblr.com

    Origin

    Richard Dawkins created a new T-shirt to sell on his website that says “We Are All Africans” and took a picture of himself wearing it.

    Richard Dawkins tweeted this: “We are all African apes. That’s what my t-shirt means. Add political moral if you wish. Genetically we are a v uniform species. Shun racism” on February 27, 2014, in order to explain the shirt.

    People started photoshopping other writings

    It is believed to have mostly spread through Tumblr, but can also bee seen on other websites such as reddit.

    Notable Images




    Search Interest


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    About

    Paul the Three-Eyed Monkey is the main mascot of Jimmy Neutron’s seriesDNA Productions. DNA and O Entertainment teamed up to create Jimmy Neutron.

    Origin

    DNA Productions created the mascot. After the end credits of the first Jimmy Neutron episode “When Pants Attack” a monkey named Paul with three eyes and said “Hi i’m Paul!” to the audience. (Shown Below)




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  • 08/21/16--13:12: Harold Shipman/Shipposting
  • Harold Shipman is by some measures the most prolific serial killer in history, having murdered 218 of his patients. Around February 2016, short greentexts started to appear on /r9k/ of hypothetical scenarios where a patient would come to visit Harold Shipman, at which point he would subsequently murder them in his surgery. The format generally follows

    >[X] comes into the surgery
    >Backstory 1
    >Backstory 2
    >Wants me to give him/her [Y]
    >Give him/her a lethal dose of morphine instead

    Always with the same image of Harold Shipman used in the OP image


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  • 08/21/16--13:31: Bootleg Veggie Tales
  • The Bootleg Veggie Tales meme started on YouTube by user Nicholas Fedorov. Pictophile users Bob_The_Tomato and iCatchInMySleep were the first to post about it and it spread.

    Video
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=77iTCVhVx94

    Examples
    http://pictophile.com/i/n7bCQ9
    http://pictophile.com/i/Ekn1rY
    http://pictophile.com/i/MIdPuj


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  • 08/21/16--14:53: Stop it. Get some help.
  • W.I.P.

    About

    “Stop it. Get some help.” is a video clip of ormer professional basketball player, Michael Jordan, stating to “Stop it. Get some help.” It is usually used as a response to video clips to show disgust, disliking, or pity on said video clip. There can be different variations to this clip, such as some having Jordan just say, “Stop it.” or “Get some help.” Other variations have him say “I’m Michael Jordan.” before saying the phrase.


    Origin

    The video clip originally derives from an Anti-Drug PSA starring Jordan that aired May 26, 1987. The clip takes place towards the end of the PSA.

    Jordan: Listen, you got at least three-fourths of your life to go. That’s three more lifetimes to you. So don’t blow it. Don’t do drugs. If you’re doing it, stop it. Get some help.

    Spread

    Numerous users uploaded the clip to YouTube. User Violet Dirge uploaded the clip itself, with it gaining 224,000 views[1]. User XxWoLfxX115 uploaded a video titled “Furries need to stop and get some help” that used the clip and gained 50,000[2]. There have also been several vine compilations using the clip. One, uploaded to YouTube by user VINESRB garnered 137,000 views[3]. Another, uploaded by user Vine Blast, garnered 17,000 views[4].

    Various Examples

    External References

    [1]YouTube -- Stop it. Get some help.

    [2]YouTube -- Furries need to stop and get some help

    [3]YouTube -- Michael Jordan “Get Some Help” Vine Compilation

    [4]YouTube --
    Michael Jordan “Get Some Help” Vine Memes Compilation || 2016


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    About

    Fish in chicken smoking a cigarette (also searched as “fish wearing a chicken smoking a cigarette” or “chicken fish smoking a cigarette”) is an entertaining image of a fish head poking out of the torso of a chicken with a cigarette in its mouth. The image has been passed around in many various sites across the internet.

    Origin

    W.I.P.



    Spread

    The image has been reposted several times on Reddit’s r/WTF and r/funny boards. An app game that stars chicken fish also exists, which plays identically to the commercially successful Flappy Bird.

    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    [not available]

    External References


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