Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

older | 1 | .... | 278 | 279 | (Page 280) | 281 | 282 | .... | 634 | newer

    0 0
  • 07/25/16--01:42: DABIRDINDANORF
  • About

    DABIRDINDANORF, also known as The Bird in the North, is a catchphrase used by some members of the Pokémon GO Mystic team to identify each others. The slogan originated from a crossover ode to the Game of Thrones and Pokémon universes on Reddit’s /r/PokemonGo community in July 2016.

    Origin

    DABIRDADANORF started on the /r/PokemonGO subreddit with a post[1] made by reddit user stringerbellsprout on July 7th, 2016 which read:

    ’Blue team knows no team but the bird in the North, whose name is Articuno."

    “Your team was butchered at the Red Wedding, MysticLuver6969, but you refused the call,” “You swore allegiance to Team Mystic, PokeBluBoy, but in our hour of greatest need, you refused the call.” “And you, LordMystic, your gym was skinned alive by Team Instinct. Still you refused the call. But Blue Team remembers. The North remembers. We know no team but the bird in the North whose name is Articuno. I don’t care if he’s an Ice bird. Lugia’s blood runs through his veins. He’s my bird from this day until his last day.”

    In the comments section, Redditor Mitclax replied to the original post with “DABIRDADANORF,” which quickly became endorsed as an unofficial motto of the Mystic team.



    Spread

    Many members of the /r/PokemonGO and /r/PokemonGOMystic communities[2] asked that this be the “official” motto for Team Mystic, but due to the community being divided and no official motto being released by Niantic or Pokémon GO, the subreddit decided not to select an official motto.

    However, #dabirdindanorf has now become a fairly common Team Mystic hashtag across social media.[3][4]

    Various Examples



    Search Interest



    External References


    0 0
  • 07/25/16--08:40: Sarah's Scribbles
  • About

    Sarah’s Scribbles is a webcomic written and illustrated by cartoonist Sarah C. Andersen.

    Origin

    On December 10th 2011, Andersen posted her first comic onto Tumblr[1] with the caption, “I decided to start posting comics I make about my life. Maybe other art students will relate to this…” Originally, the comic was called “Doodle Time,” but Andersen changed it when GoComics decided to syndicate the comic.[2]



    Spread

    “Doodle Time” quickly garnered attention. Andersen’s first comic has attracted over 4800 notes on Tumblr as of July 25th, 2016. Soon, she was picked up by larger blogs like Tastefully Offensive, who started regularly posting her work. One comic, “Waking Up,”[3] Andersen considers the moment she went “truly ‘viral.’” The comic has over 128,000 notes as of July 25th, 2016.



    Sarah’s Scribbles has continued to grow to due its relatable nature. The webcomic’s Facebook page has over 1,000,000 likes,[4] and Andersen’s personal Twitter has over 134,000 followers.[5]

    On March 8th, 2016, Andersen released a book of Sarah’s Scribbles comics, Adulthood is a Myth: A “Sarah’s Scribbles” Collection.[6]

    Various Examples



    Search Interest



    External References


    0 0
  • 07/25/16--10:14: Running Joe Budden
  • About

    Running Joe Budden is a photoshop and reaction image series based on several videos of rapper Joe Budden chasing down two young men for filming him in his driveway.

    Origin

    On July 24th, several Snapchat videos began circulating on Twitter, showing two young men approaching Joe Budden in his driveway, who subsequently chases them down for disturbing him (shown below).[2][3][4][9] In several of the tweets, the two men are described as fans of Drake and his record label OVO Sound.



    Spread

    That same day, Twitter user @PhillyCustoms[5] posted a tweet juxtaposing a screen capture of Budden running juxtaposed next to a screen capture of the T-1000 android assassin from the 1990 science fiction film Terminator 2: Judgement Day (shown below, left). Within 24 hours, the tweet gained over 1,600 retweets and 1,000 likes. Meanwhile, Twitter user @the_blueprint posted a screencapture of Budden staring into a car window with a caption referencing Budden’s 2003 hip hop song “Pump It Up” (shown below, right).



    Additionally, several Twitter users posted photoshops featuring a screenshot of Budden running superimposed into a variety of humorous contexts (shown below).[6][7][8]



    Also on July 24th, Budden tweeted[3]“these are some of the greatest memes ever,” but warned against kids approaching strangers homes (shown below). Within 24 hours, the tweet gained over 5,800 retweets and 5,200 likes. In the coming days, several news sites published articles about the online reaction to the videos, including Complex,[10] UpRoxx,[11] Metro[12] and VH1.[13]



    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References


    0 0
  • 07/25/16--12:03: Vinyl Scratch's Bass Cannon
  • W.I.P.



    About

    Bass Cannon is a is a popular meme for the character Vinyl Scratch from the series My Little Pony:Friendship is Magic.

    Origin

    In Apr 22, 2012, Youtuber Alligator Tub Productions uploaded a video called “Epic Wub Time: Musicians of Ponyville”. It gained over 6,187,046 views and 26,325 Comments. (shown below)



    Spread

    On Jun 19, 2013, Youtuber 1KidsEntertainment (Elite3) uploaded a video called" Nowacking (Vinyl Scratch) Saying “Bass Cannon” Around 700 Times". It gained over 126,048 views and 2,039 Comments. (shown below)



    Notable Examples

    W.I.P.

    Search Interest



    External References


    0 0

    Overview

    2016 Democratic National Committee Email Leak is an ongoing political scandal surrounding a series of internal correspondences among the staff members of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) in which they discuss various tactics to undermine the campaign of Bernie Sanders in order to secure Hillary Clinton’s victory in the primaries. While the source of the leak remains unknown, the emails were published by the online whistleblowing organization WikiLeaks in late July 2016.

    Background

    On July 22nd, 2016, Wikileaks[9] published a collection of nearly 20,000 e-mails exchanged among key staff members within the Democratic National Committee (DNC), the governing body of the United States Democratic Party, as well as unofficial correspondences with members of the press, between January 2015 and May 2016. Among other findings, the leaked emails detail how several officials within the DNC, which is supposed to remain neutral during the primary electoral process, had attempted to sabotage Bernie Sanders’ presidential campaign in order to secure the victory of Hillary Clinton.

    Developments

    DNC Chairperson’s Resignation

    On July 24th, Debbie Wasserman Schultz, United States congresswoman and the chairwoman of the DNC, announced her immediate resignation from the position in the aftermath of the leak. In addition, Schultz’ scheduled appearances at the Democratic National Convention on the following week were cancelled.

    Official Responses

    In response to the revelation, Bernie Sanders expressed that he was “disappointed” by the leak, though “not shocked,” and urged Schultz to resign from the chair, while Terry McAuliffe, Governor of Virginia who previously served as the DNC chairman, slammed the findings from the emails as “totally unacceptable behavior.” On July 24th, Clinton’s campaign manager Robby Mook publicly alleged that the leak was orchestrated by Russian hackers in an effort to help Donald Trump win the election.

    Source of Origin

    Although WikiLeaks has not disclosed any information regarding the identity of its source, several Democratic party officials have alleged that Russian hackers were behind the breach of the DNC email servers, while a lone hacker who goes by the handle “Guccifer 2.0,” a tribute to the pseudonym used by the convicted Romanian hacker Marcel Lazar Lehel, has claimed responsibility for providing The Hill and WikiLeaks with the emails, in addition to a string of smaller-scale leaks of DNC internal documents that have been released via Twitter between late June and early July.



    FBI Investigation

    On July 25th, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) issued a statement confirming its investigation of a Russian hack into the DNC’s email servers that had occurred on June 14th, an incident that quickly became implicated as a possible origin of the leak by major news outlets over the weekend. However, the agency did not officially confirm the involvement of the Russian cyber attacks as the source of the leak. On July 26th, The New York Times[14] reported that American intelligence informed the White House they have “high confidence” that the DNC email hack was orchestrated by the Russian government.[14] Additionally, the Times reported that the hacker Guccifer 2.0 was believed to be an agent of Russia’s G.R.U. military intelligence service.

    Donald Trump’s Response

    On July 26th, 2016, Trump posted a tweet mocking rumors that he was working with the Russian government to harm Democrats (shown below, left), followed by a tweet claiming he had no investments in Russian businesses (shown below, left).[11]



    The following day, Trump discussed concerns about Russia’s involvement in the DNC leak during a press conference, saying “it’s probably not, nobody know who it is.” Additionally, he called on Russia to to find the missing 30,000 messages deleted from Clinton’s private email server during her tenure as United States Secretary of State.



    “Russia, if you’re listening, I hope you’re able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing. I think you will probably be rewarded mightily by our press.”

    Meanwhile, Trump posted a tweet urging “Russia or any other country” in possession of Clinton’s deleted emails to “share them with the FBI” (shown below). Within 24 hours, the tweet gained over 58,500 likes and 23,400 retweets.[10]



    Also on July 27th, The Washington Post[8] published an article titled “Donald Trump Basically Just Encouraged Russia to Spy on Hillary Clinton,” which subsequently reached the front page of the /r/politics[9] subreddit. Shortly after, Redditor forgitittwice submitted a post titled “Trump’s call for Russia to find Clinton’s deleted emails is treasonous” to the /r/changemyview[13] subreddit, where it gathered upwards of 2,100 votes (72% upvoted) and 330 comments in 24 hours. On July 28th, Trump was interviewed on the talk show Fox & Friends, where he claimed he was being “sarcastic” about urging Russia to find Clinton’s missing emails (shown below).



    The same day, television host Piers Morgan posted a tweet mocking the United States media for going “insane with fury” over Trump’s “funny, obvious joke” regarding Russia finding Clinton’s missing emails (shown below).[12]



    Search Interest



    External References


    0 0
  • 07/26/16--09:25: #M7Challenge
  • About

    The #M7Challenge is an African TwitterPhoto Fad and Photoshop meme in which users playfully skewer a picture of Ugandan president Yoweri Kaguta Museveni sitting in a chair taking a phone call on the side of a road.

    Origin

    On July 12th, 2016, Museveni posted a series of photos of him taking a call and chatting with citizens on the side of the road connecting Uganda to Tanzania through Isingiro to Facebook[1] with the caption:

    On the way from Isingiro District where I had presided over the World Population Day celebrations yesterday, I stopped at Kyeirumba Village to make an urgent phone call and also had a brief chat with the residents. They thanked the government for tarmacking the road that connects Uganda to Tanzania through Isingiro. The 74km road cost Shs178 billion. The residents also asked that government engages solar panel distributors to reduce cost. We shall follow up on this.

    The post has over 2800 likes and reactions as of July 26th, 2016.



    Spread

    Shortly after Museveni’s post, journalist Rachael Akidi posted the pictures to Twitter.[2] A little over two hours later, Twitter user @ReliqOhmuwezi[3] tweeted a picture of himself in a blue lawn chair with a phone with the caption “The #M7Challenge @HiledMPrince @deotiba.”



    Twitter jumped on the challenge, and the trend was covered the same day by The Guardian.[4] The trend was also reported on by many African news outlets,[8] and picked up by Western outlets CNN[6] and the International Business Times.[7]

    Besigye Cover-Up Conspiracy

    Some Twitter users and journalists noticed the viral spread of the #M7Challenge coincided with the release of opposition leader Kizza Besigye from prison on bail, two months after he was was arrested for treason after calling the February elections in Uganda a sham. This led to speculation that the #M7Challenge was orchestrated to overshadow news of Besigye’s release.[9]



    Kenyan Comedian’s Death

    On Saturday, July 16th, 23-year old comedian Cosmas Yatich was killed on the Thika Super Highway when he was hit by a speeding car as he attempted the #M7Challenge in Ruiru.[5]

    Various Examples



    Search History

    External References


    0 0
  • 07/27/16--12:25: Sosig
  • About

    Sosig is an image macro featuring an image of the Chef and TV personality Gordon Ramsay holding a sausage with the caption “sosig.”



    Origins


    The original photo that was edited to make the first “sosig” meme comes from a photo of Gordon Ramsay taken from Dave Pullig’s Flickr account on June 18th 2006.[5] The word “sosig” likely stems from an image of a child’s drawing uploaded to Imgur on Septermber 24th, 2015.[2] On July 22nd, 2016 the Facebook page “Colorful M e m e s”[1] created the Gordon Ramsey sosig image macro in a gallery called “sosig.”

    Spread

    The “sosig” gallery gained over 2100 likes in a week. It spawned Weird Facebook pages devoted primarily posting “sosig” memes, including “Sending nudes i r o n i c a l l y”[3] and “It was just a sosig bro,”[4] both of which acquired thousands of likes in a few days. On July 29th, 2016, The Daily Dot[7] published an article explaining sosig, causing the pages to ironically declare sosig was dead.[8]

    As of August 1st, 2016, there have been 99 posts uploaded to iFunny under the “#sosig” tag.[6]

    Various Examples



    Search Interest



    External References


    0 0
  • 08/01/16--06:37: Fight Song
  • About

    “Fight Song” is a 2015 pop song by American singer-songwriter Rachel Platten. In July 2016, a music video featuring an a cappella cover of the song was released in support of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at the Democratic National Convention, which many mocked online for being cringeworthy.

    Origin

    On February 19th, 2015, Columbia Records released “Fight Song” as a single for Rachel Platten’s EP of the same name. On May 19th, the official music video for the track was released (shown below). Over the next two years, the video gained over 205 million views and 55,900 comments.



    Spread

    On July 17th, 2015, YouTuber Culter35 uploaded a Twitter-themed music video parody of “Fight Song” (shown below, left). On October 29th, ThePianoGuys YouTube channel uploaded a “Scottish cover” of the song, which gathered more than 11.9 million views and 5,400 comments in nine months (shown below, right).



    On January 5th, 2016, the Nano Active Productions YouTube channel uploaded a Minecraft-themed parody of the song (shown below, left). Within seven months, the video garnered upwards of 2.6 million views and 6,600 comments. On June 14th, The Holdness Family posted a parody version of the song titled “Dad Song” (shown below).



    Hillary Clinton’s Presidential Campaign

    On July 26th, 2016, the Democratic National Convention YouTube channel uploaded an a cappella cover of the song starring various celebrities singing in support of presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (shown below). Within one week, the video gained over 1.6 million views and 14,300 comments, with upwards of 30,800 dislikes and 28,100 likes.



    On July 28th, The Late Show with Stephen Colbert featured a a parody version of the video starring Stephen Colbert and John Oliver (shown below). The same day, BuzzFeed[1] published a compilation of negative reactions to the video. The following day, the conservative news site Heat Street[2] published an article about the negative comments submitted to the video on YouTube.



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 08/01/16--10:37: Khizr Khan's DNC Speech
  • Overview

    Khizr Khan’s DNC Speech refers to an address delivered by Khizir Khan, a Pakistani American and the father of deceased United States war veteran Captain Humayun Khan, to honor his son’s sacrifice and condemn Donald Trump for his lack of respect towards minority groups, including the Muslim-American community, at the Democratic National Convention in July 2016.

    Background

    On July 28th, 2016, Khizr and Ghazala Khan, Pakistani-born Americans and the parents of American war veteran Captain Humayun Khan, made a special appearance at the Democratic National Convention to deliver a speech in honor of their son, who was killed in action by a car bomb during Operation Iraqi Freedom in June 2004. During the speech, Khizr also criticized Donald Trump for his proposed ban on Muslim immigration and questioned the Republican presidential nominee’s understanding of the United States Constitution (shown below).



    Donald Trump, you are asking Americans to trust you with our future. Let me ask you: Have you even read the U.S. Constitution? I will gladly lend you my copy. In this document, look for the words “liberty” and “equal protection of law.”

    Notable Developments

    Trump’s Responses

    On July 30th, Trump discussed Khan’s speech during an interview on ABC News,[3] where he questioned if Ghazala Khan “was allowed to have anything to say” and claimed to have made “sacrifices” for the United States with his businesses and charity work (shown below).





    Stephanopoulos: There’s a man named Khizr Khan speaking at the Democratic convention. His son Captain Humayun Khan was killed serving in Iraq and he had some very tough questions for you. He said you wouldn’t have even let his son in America…

    Trump: He doesn’t know, he doesn’t know that. I saw him. He was very emotional and probably looked like a nice guy to me. His wife, if you look at his wife, she was standing there. She had nothing to say, she probably…maybe she wasn’t allowed to have anything to say, you tell me but plenty of people have written that. She was extremely quiet and it looked like she had nothing to say, a lot of people have said that and, personally, I watched him, I wish him the best of luck, George.



    On July 31st, Trump tweeted that Captain Khan “was a hero” and criticized “leaders” for not eradicating “radical islamic terror” (shown below, left).[7] That same morning, Trump tweeted that Khan had “viciously attacked” him at the Democratic Convention and that Clinton voted for the Iraq War that led to the death of his son (shown below, right).[2] Within 24 hours, the tweets gathered upwards of 40,900 and 53,000 likes respectively.



    Online Reaction

    Trump’s statements were widely condemned by political opponents online, who derided the Republican presidential nominee for disrespecting the Gold Star Khan family. On July 30th, critics of Trump began tweeting the hashtag “#TrumpSacrifices,” along with various petty hardships presumably faced by presidential candidate (shown below).[5]



    The following day, Redditor cfmonkey45 posted a photograph of Humayun Khan to the /r/EnoughTrumpSpam[1] subreddit, where it gathered upwards of 5,400 votes (83% upvoted) and 100 comments within 24 hours.



    Khan Family’s Responses

    On July 27th, Khan was interview on ABC News, where he derided Trump for being “devoid of felling the pain of a mother who has sacrificed her son” (shown below).



    On July 30th, Khan was interviewed on MSNBC, where he criticized Republicans for supporting Trump (shown below, left). The following day, Khan appeared on CNN, accusing Trump of having a “black soul” and being “incapable of empathy” (shown below, right). Also on July 31st, The Washington Post[4] published an editorial written by Ghazala Khan, in which she criticized Trump for being ignorant about Islam and the Koran.



    GOP Reactions

    On July 29th, former Governor of Arkansas Mike Huckabee defended Trump’s statements in an interview with The Kelly File host Megyn Kelly (shown below).



    On July 30th, Republican Governor of Ohio John Kasich tweeted that Gold Star parents like the Khan’s should only be talked about “with honor and respect,” gaining over 39,400 likes and 16,700 retweets within 48 hours (shown below, left). The following day, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush tweeted that Trump’s statements were “incredibly disrespectful” (shown below, right).[6] In 24 hours, the tweet accumulated more than 13,400 likes and 7,900 retweets.



    On August 1st, the senior United States Senator from Arizona John McCain released a statement condemning Trump’s remarks about the Khan family, claiming that Trump’s views did not represent those of the Republican Party:

    “In recent days, Donald Trump disparaged a fallen soldier’s parents. He has suggested that the likes of their son should not be allowed in the United States -- to say nothing of entering its service. I cannot emphasize enough how deeply I disagree with Mr. Trump’s statement. I hope Americans understand that the remarks do not represent the views of our Republican Party, its officers, or candidates.

    Spike in Sales of The Constitution

    In the light of the controversy that ensued in the days after Khan’s DNC speech, the online sales of a pocket-sized edition of the Constitution[8] published by the National Center for Constitutional Studies skyrocketed on Amazon, and by August 1st, it had become the second bestselling book on the site.



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 08/01/16--10:37: Alolan Exeggutor


  • About

    Alolan Exeggutor is a Grass-Dragon type Pokémon and an alternative form of the Pokémon Exeggutor that will be featured in Nintendo’s upcoming generation of the video games Pokémon: Sun and Moon. Upon its reveal, Alolan Exeggutor’s long neck inspired several parodies and photo edits.

    Origin

    On August 1, 2016, the Official Pokémon Channel uploaded a new video showcasing some of Pokémon: Sun and Moon’s new Pokémon. One of which was the Alola form of Exeggutor.


    Spread

    Following the release of the video, the hashtag “ナッシー” (Japanese for Exeggutor) reached 329,000 Tweets and “exeggutor” became trending topic, with both searches leading to several edits mocking the large neck of the Pokémon.[1][2] The same day, Twitter user @sameanko uploaded a fanart image featuring elongated versions of other Pokémon, in less than a day it garnered over 12,000 retweets and 8,000 likes (Shown, below).[3] On 4chan’s Pokémon board /vp/, a thread containing several edits was submitted.[4]



    Various Examples



    External References


    0 0
  • 08/01/16--10:49: OL STONE COLD
  • About

    OL STONECOLD is a Weird Facebook page that posts left-leaning political statements, as well as nihilist and atheist opinions, in the voice of American actor retired WWE wrestler “Stone Cold” Steve Austin. Oftentimes, the fictional character’s commentaries conclude with one of Austin’s better known catchphrases, such as “GIMME A HELL YEAH” or “AND THAT’S THEBOTTOMLINE.”



    Origin

    The Facebook profile[1] page for the politically liberal caricature of Steve Austin was created under the name “StoneCold Steve Austin” on December 6th, 2012, with the first post that read:

    OLDSTONECOLD IS JUSTFIGURINGTHISFACEBOOKTHINGOUTBUTWHEN HE DOES HE’S GONNASTOMP A MUDHOLE IN ALLYOUSUMBITCHESAND THAT’S THEBOTTOMLINE

    Spread

    Between 2013 and 2016, the “StoneCold Steve Austin” profile gained over 4,600 friends. On May 3rd, 2016, Redditor Xillath submitted a screenshot of a status update scolding the use of the Confederate flag as Facebook profile images to the /r/ForwardsFromGrandma subreddit[4], where it received 143 points and 99% upvotes (shown below).



    On May 4th, StoneCold Steve Austin announced the launch of a separate fan page[2] titled “OL STONE COLD" in honor of the fictional character, due to an overwhelming volume of friendship requests that had been sent to the original Facebook page. Upon its launch, the “OL STONE COLD” fan page[3] quickly gained traction among Weird Facebook subscribers, amassing over 17,000 likes within the first three months. On May 9th, the original “StoneCold Steve Austin” page posted a status update revealing that the account had been zucked by Facebook administrators, and as a result, its profile name was changed to “Steve Austin.”[5]

    Various Examples



    Search Interest



    External References


    0 0
  • 08/01/16--13:47: Clap Emoji
  • About

    The Clap Emoji is an ideogram depicting two hands clapping which is often used online to depict the “ratchet clap,” the practice of clapping one’s hands between words to add emphasis in a condescending manner.

    Origin

    In 2010, the clapping hands emoji was added to the official Unicode emoji set.[5] On May 3rd, 2014, Urban Dictionary[1] user Alexandria Princess submitted an entry for “ratchet clap,” defining the expression as an applauding gesture used by “ratchet” people to “emphasize a point or statement.”

    Spread

    On July 28th, 2015, the clap emoji was listed in a Complex[2] article titled “Emojis That Have a Second Meaning on #RapTwitter,” which noted that the ideogram is used for “extra emphasis when making a point, declaration and/or statement.” On September 20th, Tumblr user cat-pun[7] published a post in which the clapping emoji is used for emphasis when questioning why people reblog their own personal posts (shown below). Within 10 months, the post gained over 51,000 notes.



    On February 26th, 2016, the Disney entertainment blog Oh My Disney[6] published a listicle titled “10 Disney Quotes That Work Perfectly With the Handclap Emoji.” On March 17th, The Night Show aired a segment on “Black Lady Sign Language,” in which comedian Robin Thede describes how black women “double clap on syllables” for emphasis (shown below).



    On April 6th, Slate[3] published an article about the clap emoji’s use for adding emphasis to statements made online. On July 31st, Redditor MPixels submitted a post asking about the clap emoji to /r/OutOfTheLoop,[4] where many cited it’s usage for emphasis.

    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 08/01/16--14:42: Nico Nico Nii
  • WIP

    About

    “Nico Nico Nii” is a memetic expression spoken by the character Yazawa Nico from the anime Love Live!, which has seen repeated use as a reference to the series or simply as a shitpost.

    The expression can also be used when referring to an image of Nico doing her signature hand gestures.

    Origin

    The original scene featuring the phrase as spoken by the character Yazawa Nico occured in Love Live! Episode 5, initially airing on 3rd February 2013.[1] The scene was amusing to viewers due to its exemplary representation of traditional “cute idol” and moe stereotypes clashing with Nico’s personality.

    Spread

    The expression is frequently referred to during discussion of the franchise on internet message boards such as 4chan’s /a/. Archive results on Fireden return over 250 results since October 2015,[2] and over 350 results are returnend on DesuArchive since July 2015.[3]

    use of the phrase exists on other anime-related and fandom websites. There is a private subreddit which refers to the meme, called r/NicoNicoNii,[4] and a search for the term across Reddit returns many results for fanart, reaction gifs and various Nico-related content.[5]

    Examples

    Related Memes

    Nico Nico Knee

    Professional wrestler Marcellus Black, also known by his Twitter handle “Great Black Otaku”, utilises a signature move based on Nico’s trademark hand gestures; a running knee dubbed the “Nico Nico Nii”. Black will shout the meme before running at his opponent to execute the move.

    Upon news of Williams’ signing by WWE on 1st August 2016, a thread on r/SquaredCircle reached the “hot” section of the subreddit, and many users replied to the thread with references to Nico, the Nico Nico Nii, or other anime-related memes such as waifu.[6]

    Search Interest


    References


    0 0
  • 08/01/16--15:20: Alvin and the Chipmunks
  • About

    Alvin and the Chipmunks is an American animated franchise created by Ross Bagdasarian Sr., for a novelty record in 1958.

    History

    In 1958, Ross Bagdasarian, Sr. released a novelty song (as David Seville) about being unsuccessful at love until he found a witch doctor who told him how to woo his woman. The song was done by Bagdasarian in his normal voice, except for the “magic” words, done first in Bagdasarian’s pitched-up, pre-Chipmunk voice, then in a duet between his pitched-up voice and his normal voice. The words themselves are nonsense: “Oo-ee, oo-ah-ah, ting-tang, walla-walla, bing-bang”.

    Rated Memes

    Chipmunk Versions

    “Chipmunking” or “Chipmunk versions” are songs that have been sped up (or just had the pitch changed directly) to be high pitched, done easily with Audacity. The name derives from “Alvin and the Chipmunks”, a cartoon show created in the late 1950’s about three chipmunks that sung with high pitched voices.

    Search Interest




    0 0
  • 08/01/16--18:19: Crayon Shin-chan
  • About

    Crayon Shin-chan (クレヨンしんちゃん Kureyon Shin-chan) is a manga created by Yoshito Usui [1] and adapted into an anime in 1992 by Shin-Ei Animation.

    The anime has more than 900 episodes and is still being aired by TV Asahi in Japan.

    History

    Crayon Shin-chan was serialized in 1990 by Weekly Manga Action (1990 – 2000) and Manga Town (2000 – 2010). The manga follows the adventures of the five-year-old kid Shinnosuke Nohara with his family and friends in Kasukabe, Saitama Prefecture. Crayon Shin-chan gained popularity among adults and even kids in Japan, despite it being a seinen manga. The anime and manga were a success with 20+ movies and a lot of merchandise being made.

    In September 11th, 2009, Yoshito Usui disappeared when going hiking in nearby Gunma Prefecture. On September 19th, 2009, his body was found dead at the bottom of a cliff at Mount Arafune. After this event the last volume of the manga was released in 2010, but members of the Yoshito Usui Team made a new manga on the same year titled New Crayon Shin-chan (新クレヨンしんちゃん Shin Kureyon Shin-chan).

    Dubs

    The anime received two dubs in North America, the first one being made by Vitello in 1994 and continued by Phuuz in 2003, this dub was aired in Fox Kids and a lot of dialogues were changed and it was made kid friendly, censoring genitalia and adult-jokes.

    The second dub was made in 2005 by Funimation, this one being more like a parody, taking many liberties, using a lot of adult-jokes, making non-existent backstories of some characters and it wasn’t censored. This one was a success, with 3 seasons made and 5 DVD releases.

    Related Memes

    I want 300 Girlfriends

    I want 300 Girlfriends is a phrase spoken by Shinnosuke in the second movie of the series, named クレヨンしんちゃん ブリブリ王国の秘宝 (Crayon Shin chan: Buriburi Ôkoku no hihô).

    Iwant300gf1Iwant300gf2

    Look, I’m making the missing children fight each other

    Another phrase spoken by Shinnosuke, this time in the Funimation dub episode Lactose Overdose.

    lactoseoverdose

    To be a man, you must have honor, honor and a penis

    A popular phrase spoken by Shinnosuke and Hiroshi in the Funimation dub episode To be a man.

    Playing dead

    One of Shinnosuke’s favorite pranks, which gained alot of popularity in Korea and Japan around 2003. Probably inspired by 1971 cult classic film Harold and Maude.

    lactoseoverdose

    Ora Wa Ninki Mono

    Ora Wa Ninki Mono (I’m Popular) Is the third opening of the anime and the most known and popular one, having numerous parodies and MAD videos on sites like Nico Nico Douga.



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Wikipedia – Yoshito Usui


    0 0
  • 08/01/16--20:04: Voltron: Legendary Defender
  • Heavy W.I.P.

    About

    Voltron: Legendary Defender is a 2016 American animated cartoon by DreamWorks Animation that airs exclusively online as a Netflix original series. The show is known for being worked on by a crew comprised largely of the staff behind the critically acclaimed Nickelodeon shows Avatar The Last Airbender and The Legend of Korra.

    History

    Voltron: Legendary Defender is the 2016 reboot of the old original 80s anime Voltron: Defender of the Universe

    Online Relevance

    Fandom

    Fan Art

    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 08/02/16--09:53: Correct the Record
  • About

    Correct the Record (CTR) is an independent-expenditure only committee, also known as a Super PAC, which maintains a large presence on social media to promote and defend the 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. While other Super PACs are prohibited by the Federal Election Commission (FEC) from coordinating directly with campaigns or political parties, CTR is able to work closely with the Clinton campaign due to its exclusive use of various social media in its operations. Online, the organization has been scrutinized for paying people to defend Clinton in various online discussions, a practice many have denounced as an example of “astroturfing.”

    History

    In 2013, Correct the Record[16] was founded by author David Brock. In December, the organization’s official Facebook[11] and Twitter[10] feeds were launched, gathering upwards of 17,300 and 15,700 respective subscribers in three years.



    News Media Coverage

    In September 2014, Mother Jones[7] published an article titled “David Brock’s Army of ‘Nerd Virgins’ Has Hillary’s Back,” which reported that the CTR“keeps constant watch for any conceivable attacks against her [Hillary Clinton], and then aggressively beats them back before they take hold.” In September 2015, The New York Times[6] referred to the Super PAC as Hillary Clinton’s “own personal media watchdog.”

    Attack on Bernie Sanders

    In September 2015, the CTR circulated an email attempting to link Bernie Sanders to Venezuelan dictator Hugo Chavez and the United Kingdom Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn. On September 15th, Sanders sent out an email to supporters denouncing the political attack:

    “Yesterday, one of Hillary Clinton’s most prominent Super PACs attacked our campaign pretty viciously. It was the kind of onslaught I expected to see from the Koch Brothers or Sheldon Adelson, and it’s the second time a billionaire Super PAC has tried to stop the momentum of the political revolution we’re building together.”

    On September 17th, The Huffington Post[9] reported that Sanders had raised over $1.2 million within 48 hours of sending the email.

    Barrier Breakers

    In April 2016, CTR launched the Barrier Breakers task force to “help Clinton supporters push back on online harassment and thank super delegates.”[14] On April 21st, Redditor SouthernJeb submitted a posted about the CTR project to /r/politics,[15] where many derided the project as a type of “astroturfing.”

    Finances

    On April 21st, 2016, The Daily Beast[1] reported that a pro-Hillary Clinton Super PAC was spending $1 million on Correct the Record to “push back against” criticisms of Clinton on various social media platforms, including Twitter, Facebook, Reddit and Instagram. That day, the article reached the front page of the /r/technology[2] and /r/politics[3] subreddits. Additionally, the /r/SandersForPresident[17] subreddit posted a warning to subscribers of an “expected influx of unwelcome content from Super PAC Correct The Record.” On April 22nd, The Young Turks uploaded an episode about the news story (shown below).



    By late July, the nonprofit political finance watchdog group OpenSecrets.org[4] reported that Correct the Record’s budget had increased to $6 million.

    Wikileaks Email

    In a batch of Democratic National Committee emails leaked by Wikileaks[5] on July 22nd, 2016, a message sent by DNC staffer Jeremy Brinster confirmed that a “Super PAC” was “paying young voters to push back online on Sanders supporters.”

    Related Memes

    “Thank You For #CorrectingTheRecord” Copypasta

    Users on 4chan’s /pol/[12] (politics) board and Reddit’s /r/the_donald[13] subreddit often mock comments defending Clinton with variations of the copypasta message “Thanks for #CorrectingTheRecord! $.02 has been deposited in your account.”



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 08/02/16--12:50: Arthur's Fist
  • About

    Arthur’s Fist is a reaction image featuring a screen capture of the protagonist Arthur from the titular children’s television series holding a clinched fist, which is often accompanied by captions describing various infuriating or frustrating circumstances. The image is taken from the Arthur Punches D.W. scene, notable for inspiring a series of YouTube poop videos.

    Origin

    On September 6th, 1999, Episode 1 Season 4 of Arthur titled “Arthur’s Big Hit” was broadcast, during which Arthur is shown clinching his fist before punching his little sister D.W. for breaking his Bell X-1 model airplane (shown below).



    On July 27th, 2016, Twitter user @AlmostJT[1] posted a screen captured image of Arthur’s fist, describing the picture as “relatable” for displaying “so many emotions in one fist” (shown below). The original tweet has since been removed.



    Spread

    On July 28th, 2016, Redditor axedowg submitted the fist image with the caption ”when people say ‘Harambe was just a gorilla’” to /r/blackpeopletwitter,[3] where it gathered upwards of 4,800 votes (89% upvoted) and 130 comments within five days (shown below, left). Meanwhile, the Arthur__Hands[2] Twitter feed was launched, featuring various examples of the Arthur fist meme (shown below, right).



    That day, Paper Mag[7] and The Daily Dot[8] published articles highlighting notable examples of Arthur fist tweets. On July 30th, Redditor MGLLN posted a photoshop of Arthur’s fist punching North Korea to /r/blackpeopletwitter[4] (shown below, left). In 72 hours, the post received more than 6,300 votes (89% upvoted) and 140 comments. On August 1st, Redditor Aerolas submitted a picture of Spongebob Squarepants holding a clenched fist with the caption “Arthur memes are better than Spongebob memes” to /r/blackpeopletwitter[5] (shown below, right). That day, The Verge[6] published an article about trending image titled “The Arthur first meme is the best new meme in a long line of Arthur memes.”



    Various Examples




    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 08/02/16--13:06: Bill Clinton Loves Balloons
  • About

    Bill Clinton Loves Balloons refers to the former United States president’s exuberant reaction to the celebratory balloon drop after Hillary Clinton formally accepted the nomination for president at the Democratic National Convention in late July 2016.

    Origin

    On July 28th, 2016, the final day of the Democratic National Convention, Hillary Clinton accepted the nomination for president in the upcoming election in November. Shortly afterwards, she was joined onstage by her husband and former President of the United States Bill Clinton, her running mate Tim Kaine and several staffers, at which point around 100,000 red, blue and white balloons were released from the ceiling of the venue to celebrate the conclusion of the convention.



    As photojournalists flocked to the stage to capture the celebration of Democratic party officials, Bill Clinton, and to a lesser extent, Hillary, were seen reacting to the balloons with child-like awe.



    Spread

    The internet immediately began cracking jokes about Bill’s reaction. One instance, tweeted by @ingridostby,[1] made Bill look as if he were trying to get Hillary’s attention; the tweet gained over 64,000 retweets and 133,000 likes in less than a week (shown below).



    While tweeters continued to crack jokes,[3][4] Buzzfeed[2] jumped on the trend and published “17 Pictures Of Bill Clinton Realizing That Balloons Exist.” Media outlets including The Verge,[5] Vogue,[9] The Cut,[6] and more published articles devoted to Bill’s reaction, while Huffington Post[7] and MTV News[8] tweeted the video. On the /r/pics subreddit,[10] Redditor nannerpusonpancakes submitted a gallery of the Clintons’ reactions to the DNC balloon drop. The post has 4,822 points (76% Upvotes) as of August 2nd, 2016.

    Various Examples



    Search Interest



    External References


    0 0

    About

    Cutie Marks Crusaders Milkshake Vector is a explosive meme of the CMC drinking milkshake that has been parodies from other characters of the series

    Origin

    The meme was originated fro the MLP:FIM episode “One Bad Apple” also on the song “Bab Seed”. (Shown Below)




older | 1 | .... | 278 | 279 | (Page 280) | 281 | 282 | .... | 634 | newer