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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 06/23/16--08:45: Pumped Up Kicks
  • About

    “Pumped Up Kicks” is an indie pop song by Foster the People which was originally released as the band’s debut single in September 2010. The song’s lyrics are written as a monologue from the perspective of a homicidal teenager, who fantasizes about murdering other youths with “pumped up kicks” with a gun.

    Origin

    On September 14th, 2010, Foster the People released “Pumped Up Kicks” as their debut single, which was subsequently included on their self-titled EP and debut studio album Torches the following year.[2]



    Spread

    On January 27th, 2011, Urban Dictionary[3] user anonymous0987 submitted an entry for “pumped up kicks,” defining the expression as a label for expensive footwear. On September 23rd, professional dancer Marquese Scott uploaded footage of himself dancing to a dubstep remix of “Pumped Up Kicks” (shown below, left). On October 17th, the Barely Productions YouTube channel uploaded a parody of the song (shown below, right). Within five years, the videos gained over 125 million and 5.4 million views respectively.



    Columbine Shooting Remixes

    On April 8th, 2013, YouTuber N0toriousFinN uploaded footage from various news clips and reenactments of the Columbine High School massacre with “Pumped Up Kicks” playing in the background (shown below). On November 5th, 2015, YouTuber Alan Ortega uploaded a similar montage featuring footage of the gunmen Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold with the song (shown below, right).



    In June 2016, a clip from Season 4 Episode 2 of the television sitcom Everybody Hates Chris with “Pumped Up Kicks” playing in the background was featured in a video remix series on 4chan’s /wsg/ (worksafe GIF) board.[1] On June 22nd, YouTuber Melody Nabro uploaded a collection of the 4chan webm videos (shown below).



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]4chan – /wsg/

    [2]Wikipedia – Pumped Up Kicks

    [3]Urban Dictionary – pumped up kicks


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  • 06/23/16--11:28: Finding Nemo
  • About

    Finding Nemo is a CGI animated film series produced by Pixar Animation Studios and distributed Walt Disney Studios about the secret lives of children’s toys that come to life when they are alone. The tetralogy consists of Finding Nemo (2008), Finding Dory (2016)

    History

    That’s a big place to find one fish.” Finding Nemo is a 2003 American computer-animated comedy-drama film written and directed by Andrew Stanton, released by Walt Disney Pictures on May 30, 2003, and the fifth film produced by Pixar Animation Studios.

    Development

    [researching]

    Premise

    Finding Nemo

    Marlin (Albert Brooks), a clown fish, is overly cautious with his son, Nemo (Alexander Gould), who has a foreshortened fin. When Nemo swims too close to the surface to prove himself, he is caught by a diver, and horrified Marlin must set out to find him. A blue reef fish named Dory (Ellen DeGeneres) -- who has a really short memory -- joins Marlin and complicates the encounters with sharks, jellyfish, and a host of ocean dangers. Meanwhile, Nemo plots his escape from a dentist’s fish tank.

    Finding Dory

    Dory (Ellen DeGeneres) is a wide-eyed, blue tang fish who suffers from memory loss every 10 seconds or so. The one thing she can remember is that she somehow became separated from her parents as a child. With help from her friends Nemo and Marlin, Dory embarks on an epic adventure to find them. Her journey brings her to the Marine Life Institute, a conservatory that houses diverse ocean species. Dory now knows that her family reunion will only happen if she can save mom and dad from captivity.

    [researching]


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  • 06/23/16--13:02: Donald and Hobbes
  • About

    Donald and Hobbes is a series of digitally edited Calvin and Hobbes comic strips in which the head of the protagonist Calvin is replaced with that of Donald Trump.

    Origin

    On December 7th, 2015, Redditor eucalyptusfire posted an edited Calvin and Hobbes comic strip comic strip titled “Donald and Hobbes,” in which Trump explains why money is the secret to happiness (shown below). Prior to being archived, the post gained over 1,700 votes (89% upvoted) and 50 comments on the /r/funny[5] subreddit.



    Spread

    On December 9th, 2015, the /r/DonaldandHobbes[2] subreddit was launched for Donald Trump edits of Calvin and Hobbes comic strips. The following day, Redditor saintsfan92612 posted a comic in which Trump expresses he must remain ignorant to be a “man of action” (shown below).



    In the coming days, Mashable,[3] A.V. Club and Distractify[6] published articles about the edited strips, highlighting various examples from the series. On December 12th, IGN[7] Forums member jabroni12 submitted a thread featuring several comic examples. On June 22nd, 2016, The Telegram reporter James McLeod tweeted[1] a Donald and Hobbes comic along with the caption “Deep in a little corner of Reddit, somebody had a brilliant idea” (shown below). Within 24 hours, the tweet gained over 1,400 retweets and 1,100 likes. The following day, UpRoxx[9] published an article about the edited comics.



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 06/23/16--15:03: Gersh Kuntzman's AR-15 PTSD
  • Overview

    Gersh Kuntzman’s AR-15 PTSD refers to a claim of temporary post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) alleged by American journalist Gersh Kuntzman in an article detailing his experience of test-firing an ArmaLite AR-15 semi-automatic rifle at a shooting range. Upon the publication of the article in June 2016, Kuntzman was widely accused of sensationalizing his experience to instill his pro-gun control agenda, prompting many of his critics to record and share videos of themselves firing the same weapon to demonstrate its relatively low-recoil.

    Background

    On June 14th, 2016, the New York Daily News[1] published an article titled “What is it like to fire an AR-15? It’s horrifying, menacing and very very loud" by staff reporter Gersh Kuntzman. In the article, Kuntzman offers a first-person account of firing an AR-15 rifle at a shooting range on the day after the "Orlando nightclub shooting":knowyourmeme.com/memes/events/2016-orlando-nightclub-shooting, claiming that the assault rifle produced “humbling and deafening” firepower, while the recoil bruised his shoulder and the explosions gave him “a temporary form of PTSD.”

    “The recoil bruised my shoulder, which can happen if you don’t know what you’re doing. The brass shell casings disoriented me as they flew past my face. The smell of sulfur and destruction made me sick. The explosions -- loud like a bomb -- gave me a temporary form of PTSD. For at least an hour after firing the gun just a few times, I was anxious and irritable.”

    Developments

    That day, the conservative news blog The Resurgent[5] published an article titled “My 10 Year Old Daughter is Tougher Than Gersh Kuntzman,” which criticized Kuntzman for falsely identifying the AR-15 as a “tactical machine gun” and for claiming to have experienced PTSD after firing the weapon. On June 15th, the NY Daily News[4] published an follow-up piece written by Kuntzman, in which he revealed that many readers had sent insulting messages, referring to him as a “pussy,” “sissy” and advising him to use feminine hygiene products.

    Online Reaction

    On June 15th, posts mocking the article for being sensational and poorly researched were submitted to the /r/The_Donald[3] and /r/Firearms[2] subreddits. On June 16th, the Mo_tard YouTube channel uploaded a video titled “Shooting an AR15, a ptsd creating event,” featuring footage of a young man panicking while being instructed to fire an assault rife on the Scandinavian reality television show Gay Army (shown below, left). Meanwhile, YouTuber Robert Landen uploaded footage of a seven-year-old girl firing an AR-15 with ease (shown below, right).



    On June 17th, YouTuber Christopher Waller uploaded footage of himself firing an AR-15 while bracing the stock on his nose, demonstrating the low recoil of the firearm (shown below, left). Within one week, the video gained over 1.1 million views and 760 comments. On June 20th, YouTuber Marcus Adams uploaded footage of himself firing an AR-15 while bracing the stock on his genitals (shown below, right).



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 06/23/16--19:25: Soros Brexit Seizure
  • On June 23rd 2016 an anonymous user posted a thread titled “HOLYFUCKINGSHIT” with the comment “PRAISEKEK IT’S FUCKINGHAPPENING.” The image in the thread is a false picture of George Soros having a seizure after hearing news that “… Leave campaign was beating Remain by a 10% margin.”

    The image was faked, as indicated by the unchanged photo caption:
    “George Soros breaks into a sudden fit at a news conference, repeatedly shouting ‘Why didn’t the false flag work?’ "


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  • 06/24/16--11:55: We're All in This Together
  • About

    We’re All in This Together is a popular catchphrase, being notable for appearing in Disney Channel Original Movie franchise, High School Musical, as a song.

     

    Origin

    The phrase originated as a song in the Sonic Underground episode, Harmony or Something, but its lyrics are not related to that of the High School Musical song.

     

    Spread

    The popularity of the phrase started growing in a season 3 Pokémon episode, although its name has still yet to be determined. It then got much more popular whit the rise of the hit Disney Channel Original Movie, High School Musical.

    Search Trends


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  • 06/24/16--12:21: Activated Almonds
  • About

    “Activated Almonds” is a line from a food diary written by Australian celebrity chef Pete Evans, which was originally published in an issue of the Australian magazine Sunday Age in November 2012. The diary was widely mocked online for its bizarre descriptions of food items, including “alkalised water” and “activated almonds.”

    Origin

    On November 4th, 2012, the Melbourne, Australia newspaper The Sunday Age published a food diary by chef Peter Evans, in which he lists several bizarre food items eaten throughout the day, including “alkalised water,” “cultured vegetables,” “homemade coconut” and “activated almonds.” That day, Australian television host Marc Fennell posted a photograph of the dairy to his Instagram[6] and Twitter[5] feeds, where many mocked the foods listed within (shown below).



    “7am: Two glasses of alkalised water with apple cider vinegar, then a smoothie of alkalised water, organic spirulina, activated almonds, maca, blueberries, stevia, coconut keffir and two organic, free-range eggs.
    8.30am: Sprouted millet, sorghum, chia and buckwheat bread with liver pate, avocado, cultured vegetables plus ginger and liquorice root tea.
    12.30pm: Fresh fish, sauteed kale and broccoli, spinach and avocado salad, cultured vegies.
    3pm: Activated almonds, coconut chips, cacao nibs, plus green tea.
    6.30pm: Emu meatballs, sauteed vegetables, cultured vegetables plus a cup of ginger and liquorice root tea.”

    According to the website AustralianAlmonds,[3]“activated almonds” are almonds that have been soaked in water for 12 hours.

    Spread

    The same day, Evans posted a response to the social media backlash on his Facebook[8] page.

    “I’m occasionally ridiculed because I choose to eat a nutrient dense diet, and I find it so bizarre as to why people sometimes find my food choice’s so offensive? All I know is that I’m well aware of the consequences of eating ‘dead’ food, and also I’m a father, and I take that privilege very seriously, so for me striving for optimum health whenever I can so that I can be a responsible role model for my daughters, and still be able to surf right up until the end, is the obvious choice for me."

    In the coming days, many Twitter users continued to mock the terms used in Evans’ diary along with the hashtag “#activatedalmonds”[7] (shown below).



    On December 30th, 2013, Redditor thayguydan01 submitted a screenshot of a /fit/ post about the article to the /r/4chan[1] subreddit, where it garnered more than 1,200 votes (93% upvoted) and 140 comments prior to being archived.



    On February 1st, 2014, BodyBuilding Forums[4] member GodsParticle submitted the article photo to the “Misc” board, where many joked about the use of the term “activated almonds.” On May 13th, The Guardian[2] published an article titled “Activated almonds? Well yes, eating them might make you a pretentious git.” On August 30th, Redditor wsgy111 submitted a post titled “Have you activated your almonds today?”, featuring a montage of 4chan comments mocking the activated almonds article (shown below). Prior to being archived, the post gathered upwards of 3,800 votes (94% upvoted) and 270 comments on /r/4chan.[9]



    On June 25th, 2015, the Waking Up With Lisa Wilkinson YouTube channel uploaded footage from the Australian morning talk show Today, in which host the host asks if his cohost Lisa Wilkinson prepared “activated almonds” (shown below).



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 06/24/16--15:50: Shufflegate
  • Overview

    Shufflegate refers to an online controversy surrounding a joke made in the upcoming Nintendo game Paper Mario: Color Splash, which many interpreted as a reference to the “Five Guys Burgers and Fries” joke mocking indie game developer Zoe Quinn during the beginning of the GamerGate movement.

    Background

    During the Nintendo Treehouse livestream event at E3 on June 15th, 2016, the company played demo footage for the upcoming game Paper Mario: Color Splash, which included a group of dancing toads referred to as “five fun guys” followed by a character saying “I can see the headline now: ‘Shufflegate: Exposed!’” (shown below).



    On June 22nd, Zoe Quinn tweeted[1] two screenshots from the demo and accused Nintendo of making her “suffering into a fucking joke” (shown below). Within 48 hours, the tweet gained over 1,700 retweets and 1,700 likes.



    Developments

    Online Reaction

    That day, many Twitter users came to Quinn’s defense, accusing Nintendo of supporting harassment (shown below). Additionally, some threatened to boycott Nintendo over the joke.[9]



    On June 23rd, YouTuber MundaneMatt posted a video about #ShuffleGate (shown below).



    The same day, a discussion thread about the controversy reached the front page of /r/KotakuInAction.[7] Meanwhile, Redditor adezero posted a mock version of Quinn’s original tweet written from the perspective of Richard Nixon, gathering upwards of 2,400 votes (89% upvoted) and 130 comments within 24 hours.[8]



    Nintendo’s Response

    On June 23rd, Nintendo released a statement denying the joke’s connection to Gamergate and Zoe Quinn, claiming it was a reference to the 1970s political scandal Watergate:

    “As many have observed, when viewed in its entirety the Nintendo Treehouse: Live segment for Paper Mario: Color Splash from E3 includes two jokes separated by commentary and gameplay that have no relation to each other. One joke has to do with Watergate, while the other is a nod to the Fungi Fun Guys from Mario Party 8. It was brought to our attention today that these two jokes have been spliced together and misconstrued as a crude reference to an online hate campaign. While we typically do not speak on localization matters, we feel the need to confirm that these jokes are not linked in the game and were never intended to be linked. Nintendo firmly rejects the harassment of individuals in any way and was surprised to learn that its gameplay was misinterpreted in this manner. – Nintendo of America”

    On June 24th, Quinn tweeted that she was “glad the Nintendo thing seems to be an extremely specific unfortunate coincidence.”



    News Media Coverage

    Several news media outlets reported on the controversy, including HeatStreet,[3] The Daily Dot,[4] GameZone[5] and Polygon.[6]

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 06/24/16--16:57: She Doesn't Have the Range
  • About

    “She Doesn’t Have the Range” is an ironic catchphrase used on Twitter to insult celebrity singers who are highly regarded for their vocal abilities, by criticizing their alleged limitations in vocal range, or the measure of the breadth of pitches that can be produced by a human voice. It can be seen as a satire of art and cultural criticism in the age of the social media, in a similar vein to the use of the expression “2/10 Would Not Bang.”.

    Origin

    In the context of music criticism, “she/he doesn’t have the range” means that the singer in question possesses limitations in vocal range, one of the fundamental skills for a vocalist which can be measured by the number of octaves that one can sing in. The earliest known ironic use of the critical statement can be found in a sketch from the early 2000s British TV comedy show Little Britain, which depicts a TV interview with renowned Welsh musicians Dame Shirley Bassey and Tom Jones, the latter of whom repeatedly utters the line to dismiss a variety of iconic singers and musicians, including Tina Turner, Gladys Knight, Shirley Manson and Paul McCartney, during the course of the interview.



    On June 21st, 2016, Twitter user @KingBeyonceStan posted a series of tweets taking shots at a number of female singers who have emerged as legendary vocalists in the past decade. In each tweet aimed at a renowned female singer, @KingBeyonceStan listed two to three points of her shortcomings in vocal skills, before signing off with the line “she doesn’t have the vocal range.”

    Spread

    [researching]

    Search Interest



    External References


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  • 06/24/16--21:31: Mayoiga
  • WIP. (Mostly using to dump images tho :v )

    About

    Mayoiga, also known as The Lost Village is a 2016 spring anime produced by Diomedea.

    History

    Premise

    Reception

    Online Relevance

    Fandom

    Related Sub-Memes

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 06/25/16--07:08: #Texit
  • After #Brexit won people started making a joke about Texas leaving the USA with the hashtag #Texit on twitter and now the news media is writing about Texas leaving the USA.
    List of news media
    http://www.breitbart.com/texas/2016/06/24/brexit-texit-trends-texas/
    http://www.politicususa.com/2016/06/24/texas-secessionists-texit-cheer-much.html
    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/jun/19/texas-secession-movement-brexit-eu-referendum
    https://news.vice.com/article/the-texit-britains-eu-departure-is-inspiring-more-independence-movements
    https://www.yahoo.com/news/brexit-u-secessionists-hankering-texit-194835260.html
    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/inspired-brexit-texas-considers-seceding-texit-article-1.2686747
    http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2016/06/25/no-texit-trump-says-texas-will-never-secede-amid-renewed-calls.html







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    [Under Construction – This is gonna take a while.]


    Bottom Text

    About

    Bottom Text is a piece of placeholder text inserted into a picture on Advice Animal template websites, such as MemeGenerator. The phrase itself has come to be a staple of ironic memes, due to how often it is included in low-quality Advice Animal memes by meme creators who forget to replace it.

    Origin

    The origins of the actual phrase date back to 2009, when the website MemeGenerator[1] was first activated. When an image was uploaded, the phrases “Top Text” and “Bottom Text” would be superimposed onto the image, which could then be replaced by a user with the actual text they wished to have in the meme. Due to many people either forgetting about it, or simply uncreativity, the “Bottom Text” would often be left unchanged, and would then be included in the image itself.

    At the advent of Ironic Meme movement, intentionally bad Advice Animals became a staple of the era, and with them the “Bottom Text” text would often be intentionally unchanged in the image, to reflect the low-quality of the work in reference to these unfinished memes.

    Spread

    The greatest spread of this meme was through the same outlets as ironic memes, greatly becoming more popular through websites such as Tumblr and Reddit, as well as the 4Chan board /s4s/. Often, such memes are used to mock people who find memes humorous, or to satirize the popularity of Advice Animals and their induction into mainstream pop culture.

    Examples



    Bottom Text Example 1Bottom Text Example 2
    Bottom Text Example 3Bottom Text Example 4


    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]MemeGenerator – MemeGenerator


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  • 06/25/16--21:08: Kuma Miko
  • Needs work. Requesting Editors.


    Overview:

    Kuma Miko is a slice of life published by Media Factory. The anime that aired on April 3rd, 2016. The anime was based off of the Manga created by Masume Yoshimoto, which was published on on April 5th, 2013. The show gained fame on 4chan and reddit due to it’s fan-service and comedy.

    Background:

    The anime Kuma Miko is about a 14 year old priestess named Machi who wants to go to a high school in the city. She is taught how to live in the city thanks to a bear named Natsu, a bear who is worshiped in the village they live in.

    Notable Developments:

    Kuma Miko is a slice of life published by Media Factory. The anime had gained mostly positive ratings until the final episode. Which was considered by many to be a downer ending.

    Kuma Miko Ending Controversy:

    Episode 12 of Kuma Miko gained notoriety due to it’s unhappy ending of Machi giving up on her dreams to go to the city. This created havoc among fans in Reddit and 4chan. Many complaints included implied psychological child abuse, upsetting themes, and disturbed morals. The author of the Manga publicly apologized for the ending.

    Various Examples

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Reddit – Episode 12 Discussion

    [2]Reddit – Episode 1 Discussion

    [3]Twitter- Kuma Miko

    [4]4chan- Kuma Miko Ending

    [5]Ricedigital- Kuma Miko Ending


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  • 06/26/16--11:40: Bible Black

  • About

    Bible Black is a hentai series consisting eroge PC games (published by ActiveSoft) and adapted to several adult animes (animated by Milky Studio).

    Origin

    Games

    The eroge was created by Sei Shoujo and developed by ActiveSoft releasing on July 14, 2000 (an english translation was made available in 2006 by Kitty Media). A sequel to was also developed by Kururi Active and translated by Kitty Media releasing on July 25, 2008.

    Anime

    An anime adaption was produced by Milky Studio releasing six episodes based on the original game, a two-part prequel, six episode sequel (which later released as a recut movie), and several animated shorts.

    Spread

    Search Interest

    h2.External Links


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  • 06/26/16--13:59: Alex Is A Stupid Nigger
  • About

    “Alex is a stupid nigger” or “Everyone type in chat Alex is a stupid nigger” are phrases uttered by YouTuber Killer Keemstar. The phrase is usually brought up to mock Keemstar, and has been featured in many “Keemstar Exposed” and Keemstar related videos.

    History

    In 2009 Keemstar was a moderator on a website called battlecamp, and came into conflict with another moderator called Alex, who allegedly called Keemstar a “Wop” and “Dago” (Italian racial slurs), in response Keemstar went on a BlogTV stream and called Alex a “stupid fucking justice all fucking righteous nigger” and preceded to say “Everyone type in chat Alex is a stupid nigger”. The video was posted shortly after, and has resurfaced many times. on January the 11th 2016 popular YouTube commentator NFKRZ who was feuding with Keemstar posted a video titled “FALL OF KEEMSTAR” using a clip from the video. Many other large YouTubers, usually criticising Keemstar have since used the clip including iDubbz, LeafyIsHere and GradeAUnderA.


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  • 06/26/16--20:35: NFKRZ


  • About

    NFKRZ (prounounced “no fuckers”), is the online name of Roman Ablo: a Russian YouTuber best known for his Montage Parodies and commentary videos in the style of LeafyIsHere and Pyrocynical. He is most known for his slurred Russian accent, commentary videos, and ongoing feud with Keemstar.NFKRZ has also been jokingly referred to as “the fat Russian” and “a bunch of f***ing letters”.

    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    Robot Combat is a technology-based sports competition where teams of competitors (called roboteers) build robots outfitted with various weapons and pit them against each other in battle. Weapons that have become famous in robot combat include flippers, hammers, axes, claws, and spinning discs, and often the hazards in the arena itself can cause damage as well. A robot is victorious once its opponents are either immobilized or thrown out of the arena. If time runs out and there isn’t a decisive winner, the judges declare a winner based on the criteria of style, control, damage and aggression.


    Fans in attendance (safely behind the bulletproof arena walls) and watching on TV desired and were drawn to robots being destroyed in spectacular fashion. The sport of robot combat was first made famous by the British competition series Robot Wars and then expanded across the Atlantic with the US-based series BattleBots.

    History

    Robot Wars

    Robot Wars was the first live television series to feature traditional robotic combat. Originally the idea of Marc Thorpe, a designer at LucasArts, he started the first robotic combat competition in San Francisco 1994. Eventually, he struck a deal to have the competition televised, and Robot Wars debuted in 1998 on the UK-based BBC Two network as a rousing success. It was also later broadcast in the US on networks such as TechTV. The main Robot Wars tournament each season was considered the UK Championship of robotic combat, but Robot Wars also hosted many international competitions as well.


    The first series of Robot Wars was won in an unusual fashion by a robot named Roadblock. Although it was armed with a spinning circular saw, it won many of its battles by its opponents driving over its wedge shape and being immobilized because they could not drive upside down. Due to this, many robots started to be designed using flippers as their weapons, and many robots would add SRIMECHs (self-righting mechanism) to counter the flippers and prevent from being immobilized by them. The second war was won by Panic Attack, whose forklift wedge was combined with excellent driving to defeat opponents by either flipping them or by putting them in the Pit of Oblivion. The Pit is one of the many hazards in the Robot Wars arena (along with a floor flipper, grinding saws, and the House Robots) and being dumped in the pit is considered an instant elimination.


    The third and fourth wars were won by a powerful flipper robot named Chaos 2, the only robot to win the UK Championship twice under the Robot Wars banner. Chaos 2’s most notable and historic victory was in the grand final episode of series 3, when it defeated Firestorm by flipping it completely out of the arena. This historic flip (pictured above) was the first such victory in Robot Wars history, but it would be far from the last, as many more flipper robots (including Chaos 2 itself) would repeat the feat many more times in later seasons.


    The fifth war was the first to be won by a robot whose primary objective was to immobilize and destroy opponents with damage. Razer, a robot utilizing a powerful crushing claw, decimated all of its competition on the way to the UK Championship as well as the first ever Robot Wars World Championship. Razer’s success continued into the sixth war, but it was defeated in the grand final by Tornado in very controversial fashion.


    Tornado modified their robot and added a cage (pictured above) to keep Razer’s claw out of reach, but critics said that the cage made Tornado too large to fit into the Pit of Oblivion and was an unfair advantage. The fight eventually went to the judges, who declared Tornado the winner and champion of the sixth war. Razer would rebound from the loss and achieve continued success, winning the World Championship for a second time.


    The seventh war, the final series before Robot Wars would be taken off television, was won by a full-body spinning robot named Typhoon 2. Another controversial judge’s decision in its grand final against Storm 2 (pictured below) led to accusations of collusion and executive meddling, as Storm 2 was considered a “boring” robot because it would always win by quickly pushing opponents in the pit with no effort or flash. Many thought the executives wanted the more exciting and destructive robot to win, and after some damage to Typhoon 2 was allegedly left off the judges scorecard, Typhoon 2 was declared the winner and champion. Like Razer before it, Storm 2 would also bounce back from its second-place finish in the UK competition and go on to win the third World Championship.



    Robot Wars would be cancelled and not return for an eighth season, but robot combat competitions would continue in live events across Europe as part of the Fighting Robot Association.

    BattleBots


    BattleBots was the second major television series to feature robotic combat. When Robot Wars relocated from San Francisco to the United Kingdom, the roboteers left behind would go on to create BattleBots. Eventually they too earned a TV deal, and BattleBots debuted on Comedy Central in 2000. The first season was not a tournament format and only featured exhibition battles, but a new format would be added in the second season. To separate itself from its competition in Robot Wars, BattleBots held tournaments for multiple weight classes and spotlighted many different robots, but the heavyweights were still the most popular by far.


    A flipper robot named Biohazard (pictured below) dominated the heavyweight division, winning three of the four tournaments during the show’s run on Comedy Central and losing in the finals of the other to Son of Whyachi. Other notable robots from BattleBots include Nightmare, Complete Control and Warhead. Sometimes, competitors from Robot Wars would come from overseas to compete in BattleBots, including UK champions Razer and Panic Attack.


    Biohazard’s smaller counterpart Hazard would also win two of the four middleweight tournaments as well. Ziggo (a full-body spinning robot) and Dr. Inferno Jr. (who used spinning saws) each won two of the lightweight tournaments.


    After five seasons, BattleBots would meet the same fate as Robot Wars and be cancelled after Viacom purchased Comedy Central and decided to take the network in a different direction. But also like Robot Wars, the roboteers would continue their robot competitions in untelevised live events. For over a decade the battles would continue unseen by the masses, until a new spark would bring robot combat back into the spotlight…

    The Bots Are Back


    In 2015, it was announced that BattleBots would return to television on ABC for a six-episode competition. For this revival, they did away with weight classes and only held a single heavyweight competition. A few BattleBots veterans returned after a long absence, but this competition spotlighted many promising newcomers and innovative robot designs. The devastating spinning blade of Tombstone proved to be the most deadly weapon in the tournament and took it all the way to the finals, but it was defeated by the armored and versatile Bite Force.


    ABC announced that it would bring BattleBots back for another season in 2016 and expand the tournament field, and the season is currently ongoing. Veterans from the previous season, including the defending champion Bite Force, as well as more legends from the original BattleBots, will compete for the championship.


    In addition to the success of the revived BattleBots, it was announced that Robot Wars would also be returning to its former home on BBC Two and begin broadcasting in late 2016. Many veterans from the original Robot Wars, including Razer, will return to take on the new generation of robots.


    Famous Robots

    The House Robots


    From left to right: Matilda, Dead Metal, Growler, Refbot, Mr. Psycho, Shunt, Sir Killalot, Sgt. Bash


    The House Robots are robots that patrol the Robot Wars arena during battles. If a robot is knocked into the Corner Patrol Zone (CPZ) where a house robot is waiting, the house robot can attack them. Also, after a robot has been immobilized and counted out by Refbot, sometimes the house robots will come out to cause extra damage and excite the crowd. Dead Metal, Matilda, Sgt. Bash and Shunt were the original four, with Sir Killalot added in series 2. Mr. Psycho and Growler were added in series 6, and Cassius Chrome (not pictured) was added in series 7.


    Dead Metal, Matilda, Shunt and Sir Killalot (pictured above) have been confirmed to be returning for the 2016 revival of Robot Wars and have been substantially upgraded.

    Notable Competitors



    Roadblock (Top, Left): Champion of Robot Wars Series 1. Roadblock’s primary weapon is a spinning blade, but it was the robot’s wedge shape that overturned the competition and led it to the championship.
    Hypnodisc (Top, Center): With a powerful spinning disc, Hypnodisc was one of the most incredible and destructive robots in robot combat history. Sadly, reliability issues prevented it from ever winning a championship, but it’s one of only two robots to make three consecutive grand finals.
    Chaos 2 (Top, Right): The first and only robot to win two Robot Wars UK championships, Chaos 2 revolutionized the warzone with its immense CO2-powered flipper. Because of flippers, going out to the arena without a SRIMECH to self-right became suicidal… but Chaos 2 even found a way around that by flipping robots completely out of the arena!
    Razer (Center, Left): Champion of Robot Wars Series 5 and two-time World Champion. Razer’s giant pneumatic claw shredded and cut through opponents like tissue paper. It’s been confirmed that Razer will be one of the veterans to return for the revived Robot Wars.
    Storm 2 (Center): Runner-up of Robot Wars Series 7 and the third World Champion. A simple, effective, but very controversial robot, said to be the victim of executive meddling because it wasn’t “exciting” enough to be a champion. Another veteran returning for the revived Robot Wars.
    Biohazard (Center, Right): Three-time BattleBots heavyweight champion, relying on a powerful flipper to send opponents flying. One of the most dominant competitors in robot combat history.
    Son of Whyachi (Bottom, Left): One-time BattleBots heavyweight champion, its spinning blade tore through much of the competition. It was later moved to the super-heavyweight division due to a controversy involving its drive system and the allowed weight bonus for walker robots. It came back to compete in season 2 of the revived Battlebots.
    Complete Control (Bottom, Center): A prominent middleweight competitor in the original BattleBots, it also returned as a heavyweight for the revived BattleBots. Complete Control’s team enjoys joking and showmanship, sometimes taking it to levels that may even be considered trolling.
    Bite Force (Bottom, Right): The champion of the first season of the revived BattleBots, A sturdy and versatile competitor with multiple weapon options. They will defend their title in the next season, which is currently ongoing.

    Cultural Impact and Fandom

    Both Robot Wars and BattleBots were wildly popular in their primes, with BattleBots at time even surpassing Comedy Central’s crown jewel South Park in television ratings. Both series would also spawn merchandise such as smaller models of the robots (pullback toys and driveable RC versions) as well as officially licensed video games.


    Robot Arena 2, an unlicensed PC game based on robot building and combat, has featured robots from both shows thanks to fan-made mods. Similar mods may also be made for the recently-released Robot Arena 3.


    The continued live events (post-cancellation but pre-revival) still had high attendance and popularity, and even inspired a new generation of roboteers to build their own robots to battle with.

    Search Interest

    Note that Google Trends only goes as far back as 2004, which is after both series were originally cancelled. Also note that results and numbers for “Robot Wars” searches may be skewed because the series has a similar name to the “Super Robot Wars” video game series made by Bandai Namco.

    External References


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  • 06/27/16--13:20: It's better than nothing
  • “And at the end of the day, even if it’s not perfect, it’s better than nothing. At least, that’s my opinion.” – said Keiji Inafune at his Mighty No.9 pre-release live-stream. Since the game (which was made as a spiritual successor of Megaman) got mediocre review and fans were disappointed with both the game and the disastrous launch, saying “it’s better than nothing” was a really outrageous.
    Though, later it turned out to be a misunderstanding. It was actually Ben Judd’s additional comment who translated Inafune’s words and added his own thoughts afterwards.

    It became a proverb used on many disappointing reviews claiming the product is “better than nothing”.

    Even the official Sonic the Hedgehog twitter page “congratulated” to Mighty No.9’s problematic launch by writing the misunderstood phrase as mocking.


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  • 06/27/16--15:18: Crying Messi
  • About

    Crying Messi is a reaction image and photoshop meme based on a photograph of Argentinian football player Lionel Messi frowning in dismay after missing his opening kick against the Chilean national football team during the penalty shoot-out at the 2016 Copa América Centenario Final.

    Origin

    On June 26th, 2016, the final game in the 2016 Copa América Centenario (English: Centennial Cup America) between Argentina and Chile was held at the MetLife Stadium in New Jersey, United States. As both teams had played each other in the final match at the previous year’s tournament, which resulted in the host country Chile’s first tournament victory ever, the game went by without a goal from either side and ultimately ended up in a penalty shootout. On Argentina’s side, Lionel Messi, the star forward for Spain’s Barcelona FC often hailed as one of the greatest football players alive, stepped up for the opening kick of the shootout; however, Messi missed his target and the ball flew high over the goal post, much to the dismay of his teammates and Argentinian football fans.

    By the end of the shootout, Chile beat Argentina by 4-2 in penalty kicks and claimed the championship title for two consecutive years. Shortly after the game ended, a glimpse of Messi trying to contain himself on the verge of tears was caught on camera, the footage of which quickly began circulating online football communities and the rest of the social media.

    Spread

    At 11:09 p.m. (ET) on June 26th, 2016, ESPN senior writer Arash Markazi tweeted a still image of Messi breaking into tears with the caption “Crying Messi Meme,” which garnered over 250 likes and 235 retweets in less than 24 hours.



    In the following hour, a slew of photoshopped parodies and situational jokes centered around the image of Messi’s crying face surfaced on Twitter across the Americas, with numerous photoshopped instances featuring cross-visual references to the Crying Michael Jordan meme. By the next morning on June 27th, the image of Messi frowning in disappointment had been picked up by several football-centric Twitter accounts as well as sports and entertainment news sites, including Russia Today, CBS Sports, Digital Spy and Hollywood Life, among others.

    Search Interest


    External References


    0 0
  • 06/27/16--02:17: Goose on Fire / Fire Duck
  • About

    Goose on Fire, also known as Fire Duck, is a perfectly timed photograph of a goose running in front of a campfire, appearing as if its head is aflame due to the perspective the picture was taken from. Starting in 2015, the image began circulated on various Facebook meme pages following rumors that the social networking site was censoring the image as graphic content.

    Origin

    On December 5th, 2010, DeviantArtist Matorlgnika uploaded a photograph and what appeared to be a flaming goose titled “Fire Duck” (shown below). The picture depicts a goose rushing past a campfire in the background, which was taken at the precise moment to appear as if the goose’s head is on fire.


    Spread

    On July 24th, 2015, Redditor DannyD4rko submitted the picture to the /r/me_irl[6] subreddit, where it accumulated over 990 votes (93% upvoted) prior to being archived. On November 24th, Tumblr user llbragorl[4] reposted the photograph, which garnered more than 206,000 notes over the next seven months. On November 27th, the Facebook[2] page “أتاري // Asperger Boy 9000 //” reposted the image. Within seven months, the post gathered upwards of 27,800 shares, 7,500 reactions and 1,600 comments. On January 23rd, 2016, Twitter user @canceric[5] tweeted the goose photograph with the caption “When your phone autocorrects to ‘its duckin lit’” (shown below). Within five months, the tweet gained over 23,100 likes and 21,500 retweets.



    On June 25th, the Surface Reality Memes Facebook[7] page posted a tiled version of the photograph (shown below, left). On June 27th, The Meme Plebs Facebook[3] page posted a photoshopped picture of the goose sitting in a car with a sign informing readers that the “A/C is on. He has water and is listening to his favorite music” (shown below, right). Within 24 hours, the post garnered more than 5,700 shares and 2,900 reactions. The same day, the Surface Reality Memes



    Various Examples



    Search Interest


    External References

    [1]DeviantArt – Fire Duck

    [2]Facebook – أتاري // Asperger Boy 9000 //

    [3]Facebook – The meme plebs

    [4]Tumblr – llbragorl

    [5]Twitter – @canceric

    [6]Reddit – me irl

    [7]Facebook – Surface Reality Memes


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