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  • 01/04/13--16:34: RSA Animate
  • About

    RSA Animate is a series of videos featuring animations drawn from lectures on a variety of topics, including education, economics, science and history. The videos are illustrated by Cognitive Media founder and director Andrew Park.

    Online History

    The RSA Animate web series was created by the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA), a British institution that has hosted public debate events since its founding in 1754. According to the Cognitive Media blog,[4] illustrator Andrew Park was hired by the RSA Events team in 2010 to create an animated drawing to go along with Norwegian sociologist Stein Ringen’s speech “The economic consequences of Mr. Brown,” which Park filmed himself drawing quickly on paper using a Flip camera (shown below, left). The style was inspired by an animation for the New York Public Library by illustrator Flash Rosenberg, which features a conversation about economics with Felix Rohatyn, Noriel Roubini and Jeffery Sachs (shown below, right).



    On YouTube

    On March 10th, 2010, the first RSA Animate video was uploaded to YouTube, which featured an animation of RSACEO Matthew Taylor’s lecture on the growing influence of brain research in political debates and civic discourses (shown below). The video gained more than 250,000 views and 160 comments over the next three years.



    On April 1st, 2010, an RSA Animate was uploaded featuring a talk by Dan Pink, author of the book Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us[3], illustrating theories about what type of rewards motivate people to be productive (shown below). Within the next three years, the video accumulated over 9.7 million views and 7,000 comments. On June 28th, RSA Animate uploaded a video titled “Crises of Capitalism,” which illustrated a lecture by academic David Harvey about possible future alternatives to a capitalist economy (shown below, right). Within the next three years, the video received more than two million views and 9,300 comments. As of January 2013, RSA has published 18 episodes of the web series on its YouTube channel.



    Other Notable Videos



    Gates Foundation

    On January 28th, 2011, the Gates Foundation charity uploaded a YouTube video titled “Vaccines Save Lives,” which featured an animated presentation by Park about the importance of vaccinations. Within one year, the video received more than 79,000 views and 400 comments.



    Reception

    The RSA Animate series has been praised by journalists for its animation style and choice of subject matter. On October 21st, 2011, The Guardian[2] reported on the positive reception of the web series across the world, including large numbers of viewers from Russia, China and Kazakhstan on Vimeo. On October 25th, The Telegraph[7] published an article titled “RSAAnimated Lectures: How to Open Your Mind,” noting that the US Department of Defense and Macy’s department store had used the RSA Animate videos in training programs. On December 21st, PBS blog POV[6] lauded the series for doing “some of what the best documentaries do." On October 4th, 2011, the “RSA Animate” Facebook[5] page was created, which received more than 3,100 likes within the next 15 months. As of January 2013, the RSA YouTube channel has published 18 episodes and accumulated over 38.5 million views and 219,000 subscribers, making it the top nonprofit channel according to RSACEO Matthew Taylor.[2]

    Imitations

    Several animated videos inspired by the RSA Animate series have been created, which typically speed up footage of someone drawing on a canvas or whiteboard. On December 26th, 2012, Edublogs published a post with instructions on how to make an RSA Animate-style video, including an example created in a classroom about the Louisiana purchase (shown below, top, left).



    Search Interest

    External References


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    Editor’s note: Work in Progress



    About

    Winnie the Pooh’s Home Run Derby is a flash game produced by Disney. It became viral for its difficulty in 2013.

    Origin

    This flash game[1] was released circa 2008. It’s confirmed that the Japanese language version (Japanese: プーさんのホームランダービー) was uploaded to Yahoo! Kids on July 28th of that year.



    The notable feature of this game is the extreme hardcore gameplay unimaginable from its innocent looks.

    Spread

    3 and a half years after, some of internet users in both /livejupiter/ board in 2channel and /may/ (equivalent to 4chan’s /b/) board in Futaba Channel (2chan) found this game in the new year holidays of 2012.[2] They launched a wiki page for this game on January 2nd, 2012[3], and spent their holidays to beat that devilish forest animals.

    Then, it became to a topic again on both forums in new year holidays season of 2013. The different point from the last season was that many affiliate blogs reprinting threads in both boards had been launched during the year. “Winnie the Pooh’s Home Run Durby” got a lot of visibility on the Japanese web by those blogs.

    This flash game was posted on a 4chan thread and on reddit afterwards by user Joelsaurus[4]. The post received 5193 upvotes as of January 4th, 2013. The post had several comments about the game difficulty and poor gameplay. Several reddit comments were featured in NBC Sports’ Off The Bench[5].

    The game was featured on several sites and forums such as With Leather[6], Kotaku[7], Hupit Gaming forums[8], K94.5FM[9], and news website The Daily Dot[10].

    Examples

    Work in Progress

    People have posted many parody photo collages for this game to imageboards.

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/05/13--11:50: Jimmy Savile Pedophile Case
  • [w.i.p.]

    About

    Jimmy Savile Pedophile case, refers to the controversy surrounding the allegations of child abuse against the late Sir Jimmy Savile, a british DJ and charity fundraiser, who had died a year before. The case garnered much attention off both the Britsh media and internet.

    Background

    On 29 October 2011, Savile was found dead at his home in Roundhay, Leeds. Around a year later on 28 September 2012, the British TV station ITV[1] stated it was going to air a special documentary titled " Exposure: The Other Side of Jimmy Savile"[2], with claims that it had reports from 10 women who stated they were sexually abused by the late Jimmy Savile. The documentary aired on 3 October, and by the 19 October, police stated they were pursuing 400 lines of inquiry based on 200 testimonies. By 12 December, a total of 450 alleged victims had contacted the police[3].

    Notable Deriatives

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/06/13--17:20: Balloon Solid Snake
  • About

    Balloon Solid Snake is a balloon figure representing the fictional character Solid Snake[1] from the Metal Gear[2] franchise. After being shared on Konami’s Facebook page in early 2013, it gained notabitlity for its rather disturbing look and difficult to spot resemblance to Solid Snake.

    Origin

    The photo of the balloon figure was first shared on Konami’s Facebook profile on January 3rd, 2013.[3] According to the description, the balloon figure was created by balloon artist Bruce Carr[3] for the birthday of a friend. Bruce Carr, who makes these balloon creations for a living, also advertises his balloon services through his website noordinaryballoonman.com[5] on which he offers his services to make balloon creations for events.



    Spread

    A screencap was first posted in a now archived thread on 4chan’s /v/ (video games) board on the same day.[6] The thread contained numerous comments on the balloon character’s disturbing look and was quickly featured in various image macros and photoshops. A post on the r/gaming sub-Reddit from the same day managed to get over 9,500 upvotes and nearly 7,500 downvotes within 3 days[11] and a template on Tumblr achieved over 4,000 notes within 12 hours after being posted.[13] The photo was also shared on the videogame review website Hardcoregamer on the same day.[10]

    The next day, on January 4th, the photo of the balloon character was posted on various image sharing and news sites such as Dorkly,[7] Geekologie[8] and Kotaku.[9] On January 6th, videogame blog Kotaku started a photoshop contest[12] for the character, which resulted in nearly 30 creations on the first day alone.

    Notable Examples



    External References


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  • 01/07/13--14:25: Steubenville Rape Case
  • Overview

    Steubenville Rape Case refers to the ongoing trial of two Steubenville High School student athletes who have been charged with alleged rape of a 16-year-old girl from Weirton, West Virginia in August 2012. Due to its highly publicized nature, the case has become a notable topic of discussions on social networking sites and other online communities.

    Background

    On August 22nd, 2012, Trent Mays and Ma’lik Richmond, two football players from Steubenville High School in Ohio, were arrested[5] and charged with alleged rape and kidnapping of a 16-year-old girl from Weirton, West Virginia at a party on August 11th.The kidnapping charge was subsequently dropped[24] and the trial is scheduled for February 13th, 2013. However, as of January 6th, attorneys are attempting to postpone and relocate the trial after the backlash caused by the social media attention.[25]

    When her parents went to the Steubenville police on August 14th, they came with a flash drive containing the photographs, screenshots of the tweets and a video in which a former Steubenville baseball player was shown discussing a rape.

    Notable Developments

    August 2012: Blog Coverage

    Following the local news report of the arrests, a few bloggers began discussing the case online, including Ohio-based crime blogger Alexandria Goddard[2] who began detailing the case on her personal blog on August 24th. Goddard’s posts highlighted tweets[3] about the events and a YouTube vlog[4] tagged with “rape” and “drunk girl” that she had found on the social media accounts of the two boys. In October, she was sued for defamation[6] by the parents of one of the students named on her blog, but as of January 4th, the suit had been dropped.[23]



    December 16th: New York Times Coverage

    On December 16th, 2012, the New York Times[1] brought the case to national attention after publishing an in-depth look at the case, specifically the manner in which the story unfolded on Twitter and Instagram as people began sharing explicit photos of the victim. The piece also detailed the response of Steubenville’s football coach Reno Saccoccia, who defended his players and stated in November that he did not “do the Internet” or see the pictures or comments being shared.

    December 23rd: #OpRollRedRoll

    In late December, an offshoot group of Anonymous known as KnightSec got involved with the case by hacking into the football team’s website and replacing the page with a video message warning that the group would release personal information for every student and staff member involved in the case unless an apology was issued to the victim.[7] Operation RollRedRoll was launched on December 23rd, named after the Steubenville High School football fan site RollRedRoll.com.[11] On January 1st, 2013, Local Leaks[12] put up a blog post titled “The Steubenville Files,” detailing the people involved in the case including the owner of the fan site, James Parks, whose email was full of pornographic images of young women, and Coach Saccoccia, who allegedly gave drugs and alcohol to athletes who excelled. The post also profiled six students known as “The Rape Crew,” one of which had admitted to raping a girl in a leaked video.



    December 29th: Occupy Steubenville

    In conjunction with Operation RollRedRoll, hundreds of people[8] gathered in front of the Jefferson County Court House in support of the victim on December 29th, 2012. Dubbed “Occupy Steubenville,” the event went onto spawn the hashtag #OccupySteubenville[9] and the official Twitter account for the movement @Oc_Steubenville[10], which launched on January 3rd, 2013. A second rally was held on January 5th[26], which had a much tellmewhere2start: Words can not express how proud I am of the 2,200-3,000 people who showed up and spoke out at the #OccupySteubenville Ohio rally AND the 80,000 online.


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  • 01/07/13--17:23: #CuttingForBieber
  • Overview

    #CuttingForBieber (Also known as #Cut4Bieber) is an online hoax and hashtag campaign launched by members of 4chan in trying to spread a rumor that fans of Justin Bieber are cutting themselves in response to the leaked photographs of the singer allegedly smoking marijuana. The hoax involved creating numerous fake Twitter accounts and spreading pictures of supposedly self-inflicted scars with the hashtag, similar to misinformation techniques used in the #BaldForBieber campaign.

    Background

    The entertainment news blog TMZ[1] published several photographs of Justin Bieber allegedly smoking marijuana at a party in a Newport Beach hotel room (shown below) on January 4th, 2013. Within four days, the post received over 15,000 Facebook shares and 12,000 tweets.



    On January 7th, 2013, a thread was posted to the /b/ (random) board on 4chan,[2] which urged other users to create Twitter accounts and post images of scarred arms to spread a rumor that Bieber’s fans have begun harming themselves in response to the allegations of Bieber smoking marijuana (shown below).



    Notable Developments

    Online Reaction

    OOn January 7th, 2012, several fake Twitter accounts were created for the hashtag campaign, including the @brittanyscrapma feed which tweeted several photographs of arms that had been supposedly cut with a razor accompanied by the hashtag “#CuttingForBieber.”

    The same day, a Facebook[5] page titled “Cutting For Bieber” was created, featuring image macros related to the campaign. Within 24 hours, the page received over 70 likes. Also on January 7th, YouTuber Wildhoglogging uploaded a video titled “Leader of Anonymous talks about cutting for Bieber,” in which a man hidden under a sweatshirt calling himself “Commander X” claimed to be the “leader of the 9gag Anonymous movement” and took responsibility for the #CuttingForBieber hoax (shown below)



    News Media Coverage

    Shortly after #CuttingForBieber began trending nationwide on January 7th, the Internet news sites BuzzFeed[6]and Twitchy[7] initially reported on the hashtag without any mentions of 4chan’s involvement, but both articles were later updated with details of the actual scheme. The same day, the entertainment news blog Complex[8] described #CuttingForBieber as “the most disturbing hashtag of all time,” but subsequently updated the post after discovering the campaign’s true origins. Throughout the day, similar articles revealing the campaign as a hoax were published by Gawker[10] and the men’s interest blog Brobible.[9] On the following day, The Huffington Post[11] published an article noting that the hashtag #SelfHarmIsNotAJoke began appearing on Twitter in response to the hoax.

    Twitter Feed



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/08/13--10:33: Manic Pixie Dream Girl
  • About

    Manic Pixie Dream Girl (MPDG) is a stock character in films noted for being shallow, quirky, feminine and providing inspiration for brooding protagonist male characters.

    Origin

    TThe term “Manic Pixie Dream Girl” was coined by film critic Nathan Rubin in a review of the 2005 comedy-drama film Elizabethtown published on The Onion’s A.V. Club[1] on January 25th, 2007. In the article, Rubin uses the term to describe the character Claire (played by Kirsten Dunst):

    Dunst embodies a character type I like to call The Manic Pixie Dream Girl (see Natalie Portman in Garden State for another prime example). The Manic Pixie Dream Girl exists solely in the fevered imaginations of sensitive writer-directors to teach broodingly soulful young men to embrace life and its infinite mysteries and adventures.”

    Spread

    On August 4th, 2008, A.V. Club[6] published a list of 16 films featuring MPDG stock characters, including Claire (Kirsten Dunst) in Elizabethtown, Sam (Natalie Portman) in Garden State and Penny (Kate Hudson) in Almost Famous. On October 21st, 2009, the We Love Media Criticism[7] group blog published a post on the MPDG character, comparing it to the “Magical Negro” stock character which similarly serves the sole purpose of aiding white protagonists in film. On August 4th, 2010, an MPDG entry was created on the trope database TV Tropes,[8] connecting the character with the “Loners and Freaks,” “Blithe Spirit” and “Silly Rabbit, Cynicism is For Losers” tropes. On December 5th, 2011, YouTuber KyletheDingbat uploaded a video in which he meets a MPDG while sketching at the park (shown below, left). On March 1st, 2012, YouTuber NaturalDisastronauts uploaded a sketch taking place in a mental health facility for MPDGs (shown below, right).



    On July 24th, Flavorwire[4] published a montage of MPDG characters in films from the past 75 years (shown below, left). On December 4th, YouTuber Adam Sacks uploaded a sketch in which a man hires a prostitute to pretend to be a MPDG (shown below, right). On the following day, Slate[5] reblogged the video in an article questioning whether or not the MPDG trope was vanishing.



    Criticism

    The stock character has often been called offensive to women for being one-dimensional and having no interests or desires of her own, similar to the criticisms surrounding Mary Sue, a female stock character that is romantically idealized to be a projection of the author in fanfiction stories. On August 6th, 2008, the women’s interest blog Jezebel[2] published an article arguing that MPDG characters were the “scourge of modern cinema,” singling out the character Sam (played by Natalie Portman) in the 2004 film Garden State as “the most pernicious of these cinematic sweethearts.” The article went on to refer to the male romantic interests of the MPDGs as “Whimpsters,”[3] a type of manipulative, selfish and insecure man who appears to be sensitive and vulnerable on the outside. On March 22nd, 2011, YouTuber Anita Sarkeesian uploaded a video criticizing the trope, arguing that it perpetuated offensive stereotypes that women are only useful as creative inspiration for men (shown below).



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/08/13--12:49: Slut Shaming


  • About

    “Slut shaming” refers to the practice of criticizing a woman for engaging in certain sexual behaviors outside of traditional gender roles, whether it be actual or presumed based on her manner of dress, speech or personality. Online, such practice has been discussed in the context of cyberbullying, as some cases have led to teenage girls committing suicide, and it remains a popular debate topic among social justice bloggers.

    Origin

    The hyphenated term “slut-shaming” began appearing in feminist blogging circles as early as on November 14th, 2006 in an article about a fight between two female bloggers written by Alon Levy at Abstract Nonsense.[6] After Skatje found out her former long-distance boyfriend was having cybersex with other women while they were dating, she posted a lengthy response about how terrible sex is without intimacy or love. When Katie rebutted that you do not need to love someone to have good sex with them, Skatje asked “And if I may be blunt, isn’t your lifestyle a perfect definition of the word ‘slut’?.” In response, Katie posted about the problematic nature of women calling other women sluts in a now-deleted blog post. Levy concluded the following:

    The precise meaning of “Slut” is not relevant here. Slut-shaming isn’t about the use of the word, but about the implication that if a woman has sex that traditional society disapproves of, she should feel guilty and inferior.

    Precursor

    While stigmatizing women who appear to be sexually active or promiscuous isn’t a new development by any means, online discussions about this practice have taken place since as early as 1999 on the Straight Dope message board[1] in a thread debating the double standard between male and female promiscuity presented within language. In the thread, some participants asserted that “slut” has an overall negative connotation, while words to describe men in this manner like “player,” “stud” or “pimp” all tend to carry a positive connotation. In August 2000, author Leora Tanenbaum published the book Slut! Growing Up Female with a Bad Reputation[2] which analyzed “slut-bashing” from the author’s autobiographical experiences in high school. Prior to the coinage of “slut shaming,” the term “slut-bashing” had been similarly used by sex ed magazine Sex, Etc.[3] in 2001 and in the academic paper “Form and Functions of ‘Slut Bashing’ in Male Identity Constructions in 15-Year-Olds”[4] by Michael Bamberg, which appeared in a 2004 issue of the journal Human Development. In 2006, the term appeared on Alas! A Blog[5] in reference to a male privilege checklist, asserting that there is no male parallel to “slut bashing.”

    Spread

    In May 2008, a blogger named Sarah wrote a post on OhYouPrettyThings.net[7] about the practice within feminist blogging circles as a followup to a column article on feminists who are against sex work. Later that year in September, slut shaming became a hot topic on feminist blogs the Curvature[9] and Feminocracy[10] after singer Jordin Sparks derailed from presenting an award at the 2008 MTV Video Music Awards to rebut the host Russell Brand’s previous jabs at the Jonas Brothers for wearing the chastity symbols.[8]



    On April 4th, 2010, “slut-shaming” was defined for the first time on Finally, A Feminism 101 Blog[14], citing Levy’s blog post. The definition looks at both the double standard in gender expectations of sexual behaviors, as well as why women are more often the perpetrators of this type of harassment. That October, “slut shaming” was defined on Urban Dictionary[15] for the first time, described in a negative light as a way for feminist to excuse their sexual behavior. As of January 2012, this definition has accrued more than 2500 downvotes. A more balanced definition was added to Urban Dictionary in November 2010.

    Controversies

    SlutWalk Rally

    After Toronto Police officer Constable Michael Sanguinetti suggested that young women should avoid “dressing like sluts”[16] to deter sexual assault at a meeting on crime prevention at York University, a group of women led by Sonya Barnett and Heather Jarvis organized a march called SlutWalk.[17] Held on April 3rd, 2011[18], SlutWalk drew thousands of protestors, asserting that sexual assault is about an extertion of power and not about the victim’s appearance.[19] The Toronto protest led to SlutWalks in other cities including London[20], Melbourne[21], Los Angeles[22] and New York City[23] throughout 2011, each drawings dozens of people supporting an end to victim blaming and slut shaming. Many photos and posts discussing the events have appeared on Tumblr with the tag #slutwalk.[24]



    Teen Suicides

    In 2009, slut shaming returned as a hot discussion topic after Ohio mother Cynthia Logan came out in public and revealed that her 18-year-old daughter Jesse committed suicide[11] after an ex-boyfriend shared nude photos of her with classmates who then harassed her by calling her a “slut.” Months later in December, a 13-year-old girl named Hope Witsell[12] committed suicide after reportedly being shamed by her peers, which led to a lengthy discussion spanning over 150 comments about slut shaming on MetaFilter.[13] Similar concerns resurfaced in October 2012 when 15-year-old Amanda Todd took her own life after months of name-calling harassment. A month prior to her death, she uploaded a video (shown below) detailing how her peers had been bullying her.



    Related Memes

    Dear Girls, Don’t Be Insecure

    Dear Girls is a photoshopped image featuring model Cole Mohr in outer space holding a sign instructing women to not be insecure. Since its early appearance via Tumblr in August 2011, the photograph has been criticized for being pseudo-feministic and slut-shaming, while inspiring a number of parody re-enactments poking fun at the original message.



    When Did This Become Hotter Than This

    “When Did This Become Hotter Than This?” is an image macro series comparing two sets of photographs featuring celebrities or famous subjects from two distinct time periods or generations. What began as a commentary on the ever-changing definition of beauty across generations, eventually led to online debates regarding the controversial issue of body images and even expanded across areas outside of celebrities, such as cute animals and inanimate objects.



    Hey Girls, Did You Know

    Hey Girls, Did You Know… is a multi-pane exploitable series that started in the summer of 2012 with an Instagram post by officialsabrina_xo criticizing the way women on the site often post cleavage-bearing shots of themselves (shown below, left). After it was posted to Tumblr on June 18th, other users on the site began parodying the image with statements asserting that women should be able to dress however they want without implications (shown below, right).



    Search Interest



    External References

    [1]The Straight Dope – What are male “sluts” called?

    [2]Amazon – Slut! Growing Up Female with a Bad Reputation

    [3]Sex Etc. – Slut! Ho! Girls Speak Out on Slut-Bashing in School

    [4]Clark U – Form and Functions of ‘Slut Bashing’ in Male Identity Constructions in 15-Year-Olds

    [5]Alas! A Blog – Male Privilege Checklist: The Slut Phenomenon

    [6]Abstract Nonsense – Slut Shaming

    [7]OhYouPrettyThings.net – Slut.

    [8]People – Jordin Sparks Defends Purity Rings on VMAs

    [9]The Curvature – Purity Rings: Because Not Everyone Wants To Be a Slut

    [10]Feminocracy – Jordin Sparks doesn’t want to be a slut like you

    [11]Today – Her teen committed suicide over ‘sexting’

    [12]The Curvature – 13-Year-Old Girl Commits Suicide After Classmates Spread Nude Photos

    [13]MetaFilter – Sexting or slut-shaming?

    [14]Finally, A Feminism 101 Blog – FAQ: What is “slut-shaming”?

    [15]Urban Dictionary – Definitions for “slut shaming”

    [16]Excalibur – Don’t dress like a slut: Toronto cop

    [17]The Toronto Observer – Slutwalk set to strut past Queen’s Park to police HQ on April 3

    [18]SlutWalk Toronto – Home

    [19]The Spec – ‘Slut walk’ crowded

    [20]BBC News – Slutwalk London: ‘Yes means yes and no means no’

    [21]Sydney Morning Herald – A rally to find the slut in everyone

    [22]IndyMedia – SlutWalk Los Angeles Storms West Hollywood California

    [23]Huffington Post – Slutwalk NYC 2011 Takes Over Union Square To Protest Slut-Shaming, Victim-Blaming

    [24]Tumblr – Posts tagged “slutwalk”

    [25]Instagram – officialsabrina_xo

    [26]Buzzfeed – Girl-On-Girl Crime: The “Did You Know” Slut-Shamers Of Tumblr

    [27]Daily Mail – The teenage girls who are fighting back at their peers who ‘dress too provocatively or wear too much make-up’

    [28]New York Daily News – ‘Slut-shaming’ trend, sweeping Internet, adds meme form to adolescent cyber bullying

    [29]WNYCSexual Cyberbullying: The Modern Day Letter A

    [30]Facebook – Hey Girls, Did You Know

    [31]Tumblr – Posts tagged “hey girls did you know”

    [32]Good Morning America – Teen Shaming the Latest Online RageAutoplay

    [33]YouTube – CBS News- Hey girls did you know


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    Beginning shortly after the release of Guitar Hero for the PlayStation 2, a game which players use guitar-shaped controllers to play well-known songs in time with a virtual band, players began to upload videos of themselves playing the songs from the games, usually without flaws and using the games Whammy Bar to achieve more in-game Star Power in order to score more points. There have been many accusations of posters using “bots” to 100% a song many would view as difficult in order to simply look cool to YouTube users. There have been videos in which the poster will show the “bot” or physical device to play the game in the videos. With the release of Guitar Hero II and III and so on (for PS2, Xbox and PS3), more "impossible songs’’, such as Through the Fire and Flames by speed metal band Dragonforce, have been added to the game’s song list, and users typically add videos of said song or other songs near the end of the games due to their high levels of difficulty. Also, videos have been posted of the game Rock Band but may include other “instruments” from the game due to Rock Band featuring drums, bass, and vocals with respectively shaped controllers. Users continue to use the game own version of the Whammy bar and “Overdirve” equivalent of Star Power to achieve the most points, and post their highest ratings, usually five-stars and 100% rating.


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  • 01/09/13--11:00: happy picard
  • when you are really excited about something


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  • 01/09/13--11:19: Who Needs Feminism?
  • About

    Who Needs Feminism? is a single topic Tumblr and Facebook page dedicated to posting photos of people explaining why they need feminism, and why feminism is important to them.

    Origin

    The Tumblr[1] and Facebook page[2] were created in April of 2012 by 16 female students participating in a class at Duke University, entitled Women in the Public Sphere, as part of their final project.[3] The students went around campus asking their peers why they needed feminism, and would take pictures of them holding up a whiteboard with their explanation on it, all of them starting with the phrase “I need feminism because”.[4] They would print the photos as posters to be hung around campus, and then created a Facebook and Tumblr page to post them on.[4]



    Spread

    After a month, their Facebook page had received over 11,000 likes, and their Tumblr had received more than 80,000 visits from 144 countries.[4] The project also spread to other campuses, such as Iowa State University[12], University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill[13], and Ithica University[14]. It’s popularity was covered by several online news publications such as Buzzfeed[5], Good Magazine[6], and Mashable[7]. The project also won Good Magazine’s “GOOD Goes Viral” challenge for the best social media campaign of the year.[8] Later that year, the creators of the Facebook and Tumblr pages created a Twitter account[9] under the name “INeedFeminism”, as well as a separate website to continue their project through.[10]

    Criticism

    With it’s popularity, the project also received criticism from men’s rights activists and anti-feminists.[15] An opposing, anti-feminist website, WhoNeedsFeminism.org, was created in December of 2012.[11] Similar to the original site, it posts pictures of people holding their explanations, but instead they explain why they’re against feminism, and how feminism has negatively affected them.



    Notable Examples




    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Tumblr – Who Needs Feminism?

    [2]Facebook – Who Needs Feminism?

    [3]Who Needs Feminism? – Who Needs Feminism? – About

    [4]WUNC 91.5 – North Carolina Public Radio – Who Needs Feminism?

    [5]Buzzfeed – Who Needs Feminism?

    [6]Good Magazine – Redefining the F-Bomb: Who Needs Feminism?

    [7]Mashable – ‘Who Needs Feminism?’ New Tumblr Promotes Gender Equality

    [8]Good Magazine – GOOD Goes Viral: What’s Your Favorite Social Media Campaign?

    [9]Twitter – INeedFeminism

    [10]Who Needs Feminism? – Who Needs Feminism? – Home

    [11]Who Needs Feminism – Who Needs Feminism – About

    [12]Iowa State Daily – ’Who Needs Feminism campaign comes to ISU

    [13]Safe@UNC – Who Needs Feminism campaign

    [14]The Ithican – Commentary: Who needs feminism campaign comes to campus

    [15]The Chronicle – Feminism campaign sparks widespread dialogue, backlash


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  • 01/09/13--13:01: Parkour
  • About

    Parkour, also known as “Freerunning,” is a type of training in which practitioners navigate obstacles by using a variety of methods, including running, climbing, jumping and balancing.

    History

    The term “le parcours” was derived by French soldier Raymond Belle from “parcours du combattant,” a type of military obstacle course developed by French physical educator Georges Hébert, to encompass his entire physical fitness regime.

    Reception

    Impact

    Community

    Notable Videos



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/09/13--14:23: Tree Swing Cartoon Parodies
  • About

    The Tree Swing Cartoon Parodies, also known as “What The Customer Really Needed” (Japanese: 顧客が本当に必要だったもの), are a series of multi-pane, exploitable webcomics based on a satirical cartoon about building a tree swing through division of labor in corporate environment. Since its first appearance in the early 2000s, the cartoon has inspired dozens of parodies poking fun at various failures in product development and the culture of corporate bureaucracy in general, in similar vein to All Right Gentlemen and Corporate Logic.

    Origin

    The original cartoon made its first online appearance on September 9th, 2003 in an English-language blog post titled “Typical Project Life,”[1] which metaphorically explains various perception gaps that often arise in software development projects through the simple task of building a tree swing. In the following year, a Japanese translated version of the cartoon titled “This is How IT Projects Really Work” was posted via Dashi Blog on February 22nd, 2004.[2]



    Precursors

    The “tree swing” cartoon has been used to explain or satirize perceived discrepancies in IT project management as early as the 1970s, with its earliest known iteration published in the March 1973 issue of University of London Computer Center Newsletter (shown below, left). In 1975, the same illustration (shown below, right) was cited in the book The Oregon Experiment[4] written by Christopher Alexander[5], an architect known as the founder of “Pattern Language”. More information about the pre-Internet history of “tree swing” cartoons can be found on the career advice blog BusinessBalls.[6]



    Spread

    Between 2004 and 2006, the cartoon continued to spread across the international blogosphere, eventually leading to the launch of The Project Cartoon, a website dedicated to curating parodies and translated variations of the original cartoon, in 2006. Meanwhile on the Japanese web, the cartoon gained much recognition under the name “What The Customer Really Needed” (dubbed after the caption from the last panel) and began appearing on imageboard communities like Futaba Channel (2chan), including a compilation of parody instances uploaded in July 2008.[7] In addition, an article for the “Tree Swing” cartoon was submitted to 顧客が本当に必要だったもの (Japanese)


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  • 01/09/13--16:59: Cybersix


  • About

    In World War Two, there was a Mad Scientist named Dr. Von Richter. To escape being captured and triaaled at the Nuremburg Trials, he fees to South America.
    While in South America, he creates various humnoid creations. One of his series was the Cyber series.
    One day Von Richter starts kiling all of the Cybers, because they are disobediant. Only two Cybers remain alive: Cybersix, and Cyber29 (whose brain was transplanted into the brain of a pather named Data7, before this genocide began).
    Cybersix escapes with a black man she called “Dad”. One day, Von Richters minions go to the fishing village where the two were hiding in. They kill ‘Dad’, because he refused to tell where Cybersix is. Cybersix escapes to the city of Meridiana. She takes the Identity of a boy that died in a car accident, Adrian Seidelman.

    Life is good, until, one day Cybersix runs out of Sustenance (a greenish chemical she needs to consume in order to stay alive). She finds a Techno (aother creation of Herr Dokter) prostitute, and steals sustenance fom her. She then takes a black catsuit, cape, heels, and hat from her wardrobe. From then on, she goes out on the proll at night, looking for some sustenance.


    Origin

    Cybersix was orginally a comic series made in 1993. It was adapted into a live-action series in 1995.

    In 1996 an anime series called “Cybersix” was released. Unfortunately, the series was cut after 13 episodes.

    Spread
    All of the Cybersix episoodes aare available n Youtube as of January 2013.

    As for the comcs, no official english translation for the comics has been made, but a blogger (Pharmadan) has been translating the comics. He has currently completed the translation of Volume 1.
    Notable Quotes

    “Just proves again that brilliance always floats to the surface.” -Von Richter (Cybersix)

    “Come back to me, work with me, and I will free you. As a team, we will be unstoppable.” -Von Richter (Cybersix)

    “Data7, watch this. That is Cybersix!”
    -Von Richter at the beginning of Episode Two: Data7 and Julian

    Cybersix: “Where did you come from?”
    Elaine: “Von Richter. I was sent to find and destroy you.”

    -Episode 10: Full Moon fascination, as Elaine was dying.
     

    “You can come after me, but I won’t run.” -Cybersix

    Search Interest

    External Links  
    http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL555EADF0228FEC48
    http://pharmadan.blogspot.ca/p/cybersix.html
    http://cybersix.wikia.com/wiki/Cybersix_Wiki


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  • 01/09/13--17:03: DDoS
  • Note: this entry is a work in progress


    About

    Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) is a method of cyberattack that usually involves temporarily blocking access to a website or server by flooding the bandwidth of a targeted network. The most common methods of DDoS include exploiting unprotected server networks, sending massive requests or opening multiple connections with the server.

    Origin

    The first publicly available DDoS tools Trinoo and Tribe Flood Network were released in 1997 and 1998 respectively.[8] The first well-documented DDoS attack took place in August 1999, which targeted a single University of Minnesota computer and knocked the system offline for more than two days. DDoS came grabbed public’s attention months later in February 2000, after a number of high profile search portals and e-commerce sites were taken offline for hours, including Yahoo!, Amazon, Buy.com, CNN, eBay, E*Trade and ZDNet. In addition, several companies reported significant losses due to the downtime, with Yahoo! losing about $500,000 and costing Amazon nearly $600,000.[7]

    Spread

    According to The Next Web’s timeline of DDoS attacks[6], most notable attempts in the first half of the 2000s were made by individuals using botnets and software programs. In 2001, Register.com came under a severe attack using tens of thousands of DNS records from around the world that lasted for an entire week.[9] In October 2002, all 13 Domain Name System root nameservers were targeted by a DDoS attack, which lasted for approximately one hour. In 2003, eBay was taken offline by a DDoS attack involving 20,000 computers, causing damage of at least $5,000.[10]



    Beginning in the mid-2000s, DDoS tools became widely adopted by hackers, activists and even criminals for personal gains, leading to the creation of cyberattack task forces in law enforcement agences. In 2007, several government websites of Estonia were brought down by DDoS attacks originating from Russia, which further added to the diplomatic tension between the two countries building up at the time. The following year, Russian hackers and criminal were once again linked to similar attacks against websites of Georgian, Azerbaijani and Russian governments in the news. In 2009, a crowdsourced, PHP-scripted DDoS attack took down several pro-Ahmadinejad websites during the protests of 2009 Iranian election, demonstrating its potential use in political activism.[6]

    Operation Payback

    Operation Payback is a series of DDoS attacks organized by members of Anonymous against a number of major entertainment websites including Recording Industry Association of America and the Motion Picture Association of America. The attacks began September 19th, 2010 and continued unabated for over a month.

    Operation Avenge Assange

    Operation Avenge Assange is a series of DDos assaults led by Anonymous against Paypal, Visa and MasterCard’s websites in denouncing their decision to suspend all transactions with WikiLeaks following the 2010 U.S. diplomatic cable leak. Some of the other targeted sites included Amazon, Swiss Postal Finance as well as a number of U.S. government websites and various cybersecurity contractor firms.

    Lulzsec

    Lulzsec (Lulz Security) is a hacking collective that carried out a series of DDoS and other hacking attacks against commercial and government websites between May and June 2011. Some of the most notable targets included Sony Pictures’ internal database, Central Intelligence Agency website and Federal Bureau of Investigation’s contractor InfraGard.

    Operation Antisec

    Operation Antisec is an international hacktivist campaign launched by a coalition of Anonymous hackers including former members of Lulzsec. The operation officially began on June 20th, 2011 with DDoS attacks against UK’s Serious Organized Crime Agency (SOCA) and persisted for months targeting high-profile websites in private business, government and even military sectors.

    Search Interest



    External References


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  • 01/10/13--11:23: Pickup Line Scientist
  • About

    Pickup Line Scientist is an advice animal image macro series featuring a photograph of the character Howard Wolowitz (played by Simon Helberg) from the television sitcom The Big Bang Theory. The captions typically combine sexual innuendo and puns related to physics, chemistry, biology and other hard sciences, in similar vein to the advice animal characters Dat Ash, Priority Peter and Chemistry Cat.

    Origin

    Redditor imonfirex727 submitted the first Pickup Line Scientist image macro to the /r/AdviceAnimals[2] subreddit on July 26th, 2011 (shown below). Prior to being archived, the post received over 500 up votes and 25 comments.



    Spread

    The meme remained relatively dormant for most of August until a compilation of notable Pickup Line Scientist examples was submitted to the Internet humor site 9gag[6] by user amberislove on August 28th, 2011. Within 13 months, the post received over 3,350 Facebook shares and 2,950 up votes. On December 9th, Redditor firelizard72 submitted an image macro with the caption “My wavelength might be short / but the frequency is outta this world”[4] (shown below, left), which received over 1,000 up votes and 20 comments prior to being archived. On the following day, firelizard72 submitted another image macro with the caption “You don’t need a rockwell test / to characterize my hardness and penetration depth”[3] (shown below, right), receiving over 1,760 up votes and 30 comments prior to being archived.



    On December 17th, the “Pickup Line Scientist” Tumblr[5] blog was created, which highlighted 12 Pickup Line Scientist image macros in the next month. On September 13th, 2012, FunnyJunk user heavenz submitted an image macro with the caption “Baby I’ll treat you like my homework / I’ll slam you on the table and do you all night long” (shown below). Within four months, the post received over 26,000 views and nearly 600 up votes.



    Notable Examples

    As of January 2012, the “Pickup Line Scientist” Quickmeme page has received over 4,600 submissions. Additional examples can be found on Tumblr[7] under the tag “#pickup line scientist.”




    Search Interest



    External References


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  • 01/10/13--14:33: NotAPoliceman


  • About

    NotAPoliceman is a novelty Twitter account run by an anonymous blogger who claims that he is not a police officer. The tweets are meant to be read as if the blogger is trying to bait juvenile delinquents into admitting their crimes by impersonating a peer trying to fit in with youth culture.

    Online History

    The Twitter account @NotAPoliceman was created on September 21st, 2012. Although faux-policeman accounts @NotANark[1] and @NoNarkHere[7] had been registered in the previous month, @NotAPoliceman[2] became the first to adopt the entrapping tone of voice. On that day, the account tweeted 19 times, seeking out illegal drugs, places that sell alcohol and tobacco to minors and people who shoplift from the local mall. As of January 2013, @NotAPoliceman has 63,639 followers.




    Reception

    On September 30th, the first @NotAPoliceman tweet was shared outside of Twitter via a screenshot on FunnyJunk.[12] On October 2nd, humor site Jest[13] highlighted a series of tweets from the account, followed by similar reports on Slacktory[15], Reddit[14] and the Daily Dot[8] throughout that week. On October 5th, the Facebook fan page Not A Cop[3] was created, gaining nearly 17,000 likes by January 2013. Later that month, @NotAPolice[4] began tweeting, recycling some of the jokes from @NotAPoliceman.




    On November 5th, Buzzfeed[9] ran a feature story with a compilation of @NotAPoliceman’s tweets, sparking a newfound interest in these accounts. The next day, beauty blog Lovelyish[11] posted its own roundup of tweets from the account. Between November 5th and 15th, @NotANark and @NoNarkHere began tweeting again. During that time, at least ten police-impersonating accounts were created including @NotANarc[5], @_NotTheCop[6], @Am_Not_A_Cop[17] and @NoPoliceman[16], among others. On November 20th, We Know Memes[10] featured a series of @NoPoliceman’s tweets. As of January 2013, @NoPoliceman has the largest amount of followers, with more than 262,000, followed by @NotANark[1] with more than 141,000 followers.

    Notable Tweets





    Search Interest



    External References


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    About

    “They Don’t Think It Be Like It Is, But It Do” is a quote attributed to the former Major League Baseball player Oscar Gamble that is often mocked on various web forums and image boards for its unintelligible quality, similar to the questions “How is babby formed?” and “Has anyone really been far even as decided to use even go want to do look more like?”

    Origin

    It is unclear where Gamble’s quote originated from. According to the Touching All Bases[1] sports blog, Gamble once responded to a question about the prevalence of racism in Major League Baseball by saying “People don’t think it be like it is, but it do.” According to sports blogger Doug Lemoine,[4] Gamble uttered the famous phrase while discussing the chaotic New York Yankees management in 1975. A grainy black-and-white photograph of Gamble captioned with “They don’t think it be like it is, but it do” (shown below) was posted on the Brownpau Tumblr[11] blog on May 4th, 2010.



    Meaning

    Due to the cryptic nature of Gamble’s quote, many have speculated about what he actually meant to say. On May 9th, 2010, Yahoo Answers[7] user Leon submitted a question asking what the quote meant, to which user Nick responded that Gamble was accusing others of living in denial about the truth. Redditor bunglejerry submitted a post to the /r/linguistics[5] subreddit on April 2nd, 2012, which attempted to discern the meaning behind the Gamble quote. Redditor ThrustVectoring then replied to the post with his interpretation:

    “They incorrectly believe that this is an atypical state of affairs”

    Spread

    On April 15th, 2011, the “They don’t think it be like it is, but it do” Facebook[6] page was created, which received over 1,000 likes within the next two years. On February 22nd, 2012, Redditor IeIgHtNiNe submitted the black-and-white photo with the title “The meaning of the universe contained in a single sentence” to the /r/funny[3] subreddit, where it received over 9,000 up votes and 280 comments prior to being archived. On March 31st, IGN Forums[10] member Dr. Indiana started a discussion thread about the Gamble quote, to which member WillOftheWearer responded with an embedded clip of a young boy stumbling over his words. On January 14th, 2013, YouTuber RollFreakinTide37 uploaded a video in which a television news anchor reads a viewer’s opinion quoting Gamble in response to the United States fiscal cliff controversy (shown below, right).



    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/10/13--19:50: Twerking
  • Work in progress

    About

    Twerking is a dance form commonly associated with bounce movement. It is characterized through rhythmic shaking of the butt, usually in a squatting position. It has been heavily enacted and mocked by the internet.

    Origin

    The music that characterizes twerking has been around since the 90’s, with the rise of many forms of rap and hip-hop. However, the term itself didn’t start gaining prominence until after the new millennium.

    Spread


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  • 01/11/13--15:46: Boardroom Suggestion


  • About

    Boardroom Suggestion is a meme in which a CEO of a company suggests ideas. The first two employees say ideas, but the third employee states a obvious remark that would be better for the consumer. The CEO, mad at his suggestion, throws him out the window.

    Origin

    The comic first originated on a web-comic site called “Hejibits” under the name Outlook Oust.




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