Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

older | 1 | .... | 259 | 260 | (Page 261) | 262 | 263 | .... | 634 | newer

    0 0

    About

    Everyday We Stray Further From God’s Light is a faux-biblical often used in combination with various images and videos that are deemed cringeworthy phrase initially entered widespread usage in association with the Minion Anti-Fandom that emerged in mid-2015, but it has since become a more versatile expression that conveys a sense of utter disappointment or astonishment, in a similar vein to other phrases like “Where Is Your God Now?” and “I Don’t Want to Live on This Planet Anymore”.

    Origin

    It is unknown when the first instance of this meme was posted online, but it was likely coined in reference to the massive-scale marketing campaign for the 2015 American 3D animated family comedy film Minions that took place during the summer of 2015. The earliest known mention of the phrase can be found in an image post submitted by Imgur user Valdros on July 1st, 2015. In the post[1], the phrase accompanies an image of a Minion discussing different breast sizes.


    View post on imgur.com

    Spread

    In July 2015, the phrase was used several more times with Minion images in the /r/minionhate subreddit. The most popular post was an image of a pregnant Minion, posted by MarieCaymus, which received 146 points before it was archived. [2]



    The phrase also went into wider use on reddit, often applied to items that were just generally cringeworthy.[4] On July 28th, a user posted the phrase along with a popular image from 4chan of a man turning into a diaper by the light of the full moon (a werediaper) to the subreddit /r/CringeAnarchy, earning over 768 points (96% upvoted).[3]



    In December 2015, an image of a bootleg Perry the Platypus from Phineas and Ferb, paired with the catchphrase, was posted to Memecenter several times with the addition of an image about Undertale and Gender Swapping. The image of Perry paired with the catchphrase was posted many more times to Memecenter, and became a popular shorthand for the catchphrase.[5][6]



    The phrase is also in wide use on Twitter, often posted as a caption to a cringeworthy photo or link. One of the first tweets to use the phrase was posted September 7th, by the user champagne_pupi; it received 14 retweets and 18 likes.[9]



    There are thousands of instances of the phrase in use on Twitter[7] and Tumblr,[8] often used in an analogous fashion to I can’t even..

    Notable Examples



    Search Interest



    External References


    0 0
  • 04/26/16--16:44: isded

  • About

    “isded”, or “pepsi” is a reaction most commonly posted in response to seeing a person or animal involved in a lethal accident, or any post involving death. Though “isded” is most commonly used in conjugation with posts involving death, it can also be used where people suffer cringe-worthy, non-life-threatening injuries.
    This fad is particularly prominent in Funnyjunk, but it can also be found referenced on 4chan and any website that allows comments. Death/Injury compliations are commonly titled “isded comps”[1]. When a user is not sure and wants to know whether the person in the content survived or died, s/he may post “isded” as a question; such as, “Is ded?”, or “Pepsi?”
    The cryptic reference of such comments can sometimes confuse new users, if they are not in with the joke.
    “isded” is considered to be part of the Reaction Image series.



    Pepsi Max is sometimes used to indicate that the person in the content is most definitely, most assuredly, dead. For example, a gorey video of a man getting run over by a truck.

    Origin

    “isded” comes from flipping a can of the popular soda brand “Pepsi” upside down, thus spelling “isded”.

    Spread

    Like most memes that reach a high-point in popularity, corrupted parodies of “isded” have been spawned. A common theme being a poorly-drawn rendition of the logo, accompanied by alternate captions for “isded”.




    Another common theme is to use other soft drink products. Sometimes with text edited over it, or sometimes just simply flipping the image.




    On the 27th of June 2008, user ‘DanjaMouse10000’ publishes “PEPSICANSECRETMESSAGE”. As of April 2016, the video has 3.1 million views. At 1:55, he flips the Pepsi can to demonstrate “isded”.


    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 04/26/16--17:52: Powerpuff Yourself
  • About

    Powerpuff Yourself is an Flash-based game which allows users to design their own original characters in the style of characters from the Cartoon Network animated series Powerpuff Girls reboot. The game is famous for being easy and widely used, but has also gained considerable notoriety for its easily recognizable style and often poor results.

    History

    The game is first uploaded in its own website made by Cartoon Network.

    Featured

    Powerpuff Girls Examples

    Search Interest

    References


    0 0
  • 04/27/16--07:33: Becky
  • About

    “Becky” is a slang term referencing a stereotypical White girl who may be known for her skill or enthusiasm for performing oral sex.

    Origin

    On May 7th, 1992, the song “Baby Got Back” by Sir Mix-a-Lot was released, which features two White girls from the California Valley critiquing a black woman’s physique in the prelude. When drawing attention to the woman’s posterior, one of the White girls exclaims “Oh my god, Becky. look at her butt!” (shown below).



    Spread

    On September 4th, 2006, Urban Dictionary[3] user rich3000 submitted an entry for the term “beckys,” defining it as “hot White girls, or snobish women.”



    On June 19th, 2009, the rap song “Becky” by Plies was released, in which the rapper repeats “Gimmie that Becky” in reference to a White woman that performs oral sex.[1] On November 12th, 2009, BoxDen Forums[8] member Lungs submitted a thread asking about the use of “Becky” in the song by Plies, to which user BackBlock_OG replied “because white girls give great head.” In August, the fashion and entertainment blog ClutchMagOnline[10] published an article titled “Introducing Becky,” which discussed the slang term in relation to the Plies track. On November 18th, 2010, a question asking “Why are White women referred to as Becky by black people” was submitted to Yahoo Answers,[2] to which user bajasa1 referred to it as a “cliche’d 90’s name for the white girl out of the valley” and user “Know Something” referenced the lyrics in Sir Mix-a-Lot’s “Baby Got Back”.



    On August 15th, 2011, the women’s interest blog Made Woman[9] published an article titled “I Am Not Your Becky | White Girl Speaks on Interracial Dating.” On October 23rd, 2013, blogger Dara Tafakari[7] published a blog post titled “An Apology to Every (White) Girl Named Becky,” in which she discusses the use of the slang term in pop culture.

    Beyoncé’s “Sorry”

    In April 2016, Beyoncé released her sixth studio album Lemonade, which contains the lyric “He better call Becky with the good hair” in the song “Sorry” about a cheating husband.



    On April 25th, 2016, rapper Iggy Azalea tweeted “don’t ever call me a becky,” followed by a tweet arguing against “generalizing any race by calling them one stereotypical name for said race” (shown below).[5][6] Additionally, she went on to elaborate that she was not directing the tweets at Beyonce.[4]



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Wikipedia – Becky

    [2]Yahoo Answers – Why are white women referred to as Becky

    [3]Urban Dictionary – beckys

    [4]Twitter – @IggyAzalea

    [5]Twitter – @IggyAzalea

    [6]Twitter – @IggyAzalea

    [7]Truly Tafakari – An Apology to Every White Girl Named Becky

    [8]BoxDen – How Come Becky is Called Becky?

    [9]Made Woman – I Am Not Your Becky

    [10]ClutchMagOnline – Introducing Becky


    0 0
  • 04/27/16--09:43: Jay Z
  • About

    Jay Z (formerly stylized as Jay-Z) is the stage name used by Shawn Carter, an American hip hop artist and businessperson most well known for his prolific music career spanning over three decades and financial success through a series of business ventures in fashion and music industries. With more than 100 million record sales and an estimated net worth of $500 million, Jay Z is often cited as one of the world’s best-selling artists and most successful figures in the hip hop industry.

    History

    Early Years

    Carter discovered his interest hip hop music during his high school years in the mid-1980s, most notably at George Westinghouse Career and Technical Education High School, where he honed his rapping skills by freestyling with classmates and future rappers The Notorious B.I.G. and Busta Rhymes. According to Carter, he became involved in selling crack cocaine around this time, but as he continued to develop his ambition of becoming a hip hop artist, he began devoting most of his time collaborating with various local rappers under the name “Jazzy” with the guidance of his musical mentor and rapper, Jaz-O.

    Music Career

    After making numerous guest appearances on other artists’ tracks between the late 1980s and early 1990s, Carter released his debut single “In My Lifetime” under his new stage name “Jay-Z” on July 25th, 1995. That same year, Carter co-founded the independent record label Roc-A-Fella Records with his associates Damon Dash and Kareem “Biggs” Burke. In 1996, Jay Z released his debut album Reasonable Doubt, which reached #23 on the Billboard 200 and placed him on the map as an up-and-coming artist in hip hop music. Over the course of the next decade, Jay Z released eight studio albums, many of which became certified platinum, most notably his sixth album The Blueprint and eighth album The Black Album.

    Feud with Nas

    In 2001, Jay Z made the headlines in the entertainment news after getting involved in a notorious feud with fellow emerging rapper Nas, during which the two artists exchanged a series of diss tracks aimed at each others. The dispute eventually came to an end after prominent record producer Mark Pitts intervened as the mitigator.

    Elevator Fight with Solange Knowles

    On May 12th, 2014, celebrity gossip site TMZ released an elevator surveillance video clip from New York City’s Standard Hotel that apparently shows Solange Knowles, an American singer-songwriter and Jay Z’s sister-in-law, slapping and punching him while on their way to a Met Gala after-party on May 5th. The scandalous scuffle led to much speculation about the state of Beyonce and Jay-Z’s marriage, as well as the nature of their relationship with Solange.



    Beyoncé’s “Lemonade”

    On April 23rd, 2016, Beyoncé released her sixth studio album and the second “visual album” titled Lemonade via Tidal, which was accompanied by the premiere of an hour-long music video special on HBO. Upon its release, the album instantly earned critical acclaim for its innovative methods of storytelling and high production value, as well as fan speculations about its autobiographical allusions to the marriage between the artist and her husband, Jay-Z.



    Online Presence

    In April 2011, Jay Z launched an official blog and lifestyle news magazine titled Life + Times, which covers a variety of interests from music and fashion to technology and sports and doubles as the artist’s official website. The content on the site is produced and curated by Jay Z in collaboration with a small staff. In addition to _Life + Times, Jay Z maintains an official Facebook page[4] and an official Twitter account[5], which have garnered nearly 21 million likes and 3.23 million followers, respectively, as of April 2016.

    Tidal

    Tidal is a subscription-only online music streaming service launched by Jay Z that offers a curated selection of high-fidelity, lossless audio tracks and high definition music videos. Upon its launch in late March 2015, the service garnered much attention from the music and tech news world due to its co-ownership by a number of high-profile recording artists, including Beyoncé, Prince, Rihanna, Kanye West, Nicki Minaj, Daft Punk, Jack White, Madonna and Deadmau5, among others. However, the service has been also met by criticism and negative feedback on the social media for its pricing system and selective promotion of mainstream artists.

    Fandom

    The Black Album

    The Black Album is the eighth studio album by Jay Z that was released on November 4th, 2003. The album, which was marketed as the rapper’s final album before retiring from music and produced by several well-known acts like Kanye West, The Neptunes, Timbaland and Rick Rubin, debuted at #1 on the Billboard 200 and received universal acclaim from the critics.

    The Grey Album

    The Grey Album is a 2004 mashup album based on an acapella remix of Jay Z’s The Black Album and various samples from The Beatles’ eponymous album (commonly known as _The White Album) mixed by American musician and producer Danger Mouse. Upon its limited release via select outlets on the Internet, the mashup album quickly spread and gained a cult following through words of mouth on hip hop blogs, discussion forums and file-sharing platforms, which eventually sparked a copyright dispute with the Beatles copyright holder and British music record label EMI.

    “Niggas In Paris”

    “Niggas In Paris” is a 2011 rap song by Kanye West and Jay-Z from their collaboration album Watch The Throne. Upon its release, several excerpts of the song’s lyrics spawned a series of image macros and numerous catchphrases including “Ball So Hard" and "That Shit Cray” among others.

    “No Church In the Wild”

    “No Church in the Wild” is a 2011 rap song by Kanye West and Jay-Z. Online, the first few lines of the song sung by Frank Ocean (human beings in a mob, what’s a mob to a king, what’s a king to a God, what’s a God to a nonbeliever, who don’t believe in anything) has been used both unironically and ironically on various fandom photosets.

    Related Memes

    “I Got 99 Problems But a Bitch Ain’t One”

    “I’ve Got 99 Problems But a Bitch Ain’t One” is a popular catchphrase taken from Jay-Z’s 2004 rap single “99 Problems” which has been parodied several times online and used in various image macros.



    Jay-Z Diving

    Jay-Z Diving is a photoshop meme featuring an exploitable cutout of Jay-Z awkwardly jumping into the ocean from a luxury rental boat off the coast in Stromboli, Italy. Since the publication of the paparazzi photographs in early September 2013, it has been superimposed into many other celebrity photographs for comedic effect.



    Search Interest



    External References


    0 0
  • 04/27/16--09:55: GIPHY

  • About

    GIPHY is an online database and search engine used to create, find and share animated GIFs. Since its launch in 2013, GIPHY has grown into a major media hosting service for moving images, in part due to its close integration with popular social media platforms, most notably Facebook and Twitter.

    History

    GIPHY was founded in February 2013 by Alex Chung and Jace Cooke, who created a solution for cataloguing and tagging archived GIFs while working together after dreaming up the idea during a hackathon.[1] The weekend of its release, the search engine had more than 30,000 visits; a Gizmodo article criticized the returns of the engine as “hilariously bad,” but within a few months the author of that article changed her mind.[2] Improvements that Chung and Cooke had made to the search engine had improved it dramatically, and it now returned useful results.



    After integrating the ability to search with keywords and post GIFs directly to a series of social media networks, GIPHY became the biggest search engine for GIFs by 2014. In 2015, GIPHY partnered with a series of social networks, including Facebook Messenger, Slack, Tinder, and Twitter to integrate GIF search functionality directly into the interface. In addition, GIPHY launched a mobile app for searching for and sending GIFs in 2014.[3] In 2015 it launched GIPHYCam, an application that allows users to make GIFs using their phone’s camera with a variety of filters. In 2016, GIPHY announced that it had acquired a desktop application called GIFGrabber, re-releasing it as GIPHYCapture; this application allowed for the creation of GIFs through desktop screen capture.

    Features

    GIPHY acquires GIFs for its database in two ways: an aggregator program that scrapes sites like reddit and Tumblr for GIFs, and a direct-upload functionality. Once a user uploads a GIF they made to GIPHY, they can tag it to make it easy to find. They are also given a wide variety of popular methods of embedding GIFs into external sources, including Javascript, HTML5, and iFrame, as well as direct-transfer buttons to many different social networks.



    GIPHY also has two mobile apps, GIPHY and GIPHYCam[5] and one desktop app, GIPHYCapture.[7] They also provide an open and free API that people can use to create new applications using their GIF content, which they catalog in their GIPHY Labs section.[6]



    Users texting with GIPHYCam

    In addition, GIPHY curates a wide selection of GIF-creating artists on their site, promoting the artists’ work as original content and connecting them with brands who are interested in making unique GIFs. In 2016, GIPHY launched GIPHY Studios, a venture devoted to working with brands to create original GIF content.

    Traffic

    As of April 27th, 2016, Alexa Web Traffic claims that GIPHY is ranked 381 worldwide and 258 in the United States, with over 2.7 million daily unique visitors and almost 5 million daily page views. As of the same day, GIPHY is the number one search result in Google for “GIF”.[9]

    Search Interest



    External References


    0 0

    Work in progress. This entry can contain story spoilers


    About

    Koutetsujou no Kabaneri, also known as Kabaneri of the Iron Fortress, is an anime series directed by Tetsuro Araki and written by Ichiro Okouchi. Setted on a mediveval Japan in middle of an industrial revolution under the attack of monsters named Kabane, the series follow Ikoma, an steamsmith who has developed a weapon to defeat the Kabane.

    Premise

    [WIP]

    History

    The series, first announced on November 27th, 2014, has been developed by Wit Studio and directed by Tetsuro Araki, both known by other works like Shingeki no Kyojin. The anime first premiered on April 8th, 2016, with a prologue for the series premiering on Japanese theaters on March 18th, 2016.



    Online Relevance

    [WIP]

    Fandom

    [WIP]

    Related Memes

    Habanero

    Habanero is a pun used by fans of the series as replacement of Kabaneri, due the similarities between both words.[2] Being the earliest registered use of the word a post from April 8th, 2016,[1] the joke quickly grew after a scene from the second episode where Mumei covers herself with a cape, making her look like a bell pepper.[4]



    Episode 2 Fansubs / Peasant-chan

    The second episode of the series, originally scheduled for April 15th, 2016, was delayed due an earthquake on the Kumamoto Prefecture the day before. Due the delay, a RAW version of the episode with Chinese subtitles was used in order to translate the episode into English, which was consequently mocked due the low quality of the subs. While several moments of the episode were mocked due the subs,[5] the most notable part was when a background character is attacked by the Kabane and Ayame calls him “Peasant-chan”.[6]



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 04/27/16--16:10: #niceshirt
  • The first significant origination of ‘#niceshirt’ was in a video posted by YouTube critic Leafyishere in a video talking about recent YouTube drama. During the video he mentions spreading positive vibes, and goes to a video from PewDiePie to post a comment saying PewDiePie had a nice shirt. Soon after the video was posted, the comments on this video were filled with ‘#niceshirt’ and ‘hisssss’, because of leafy’s appearance there.
    Soon after this event, many channels imitating Leafy or simply referencing him uploaded videos involving ‘#niceshirt’ and positive vibes.


    0 0
  • 04/27/16--23:05: Trigglypuff
  • About

    Trigglypuff is the nickname given to a Hampshire College student who was recorded loudly protesting in the audience of a University of Massachusetts Amherst event titled “The Triggering,” which featured a discussion criticizing politically correct movements on campus hosted by conservative vlogger Steven Crowder, Milo Yiannopoulos, and Christina Hoff Sommers.

    Origin

    On April 25th, 2016, student protesters began loudly shouting at speakers during “The Triggering” event held at UMass Amherst, with many accusing the hosts of “hate speech.” Among them was an enraged female student who was recorded repeatedly yelling while flailing her arms at host Christina Hoff Sommers. On April 26th, 2016, the campus news site Campus Reform[3] posted an article about the incident and uploaded a recording of the event to YouTube, gathering over 786.000 views within 48 hours.



    Spread

    The following day, Redditor Herelam uploaded the CampusReform video to the /r/KotakuInAction[11] subreddit, where many mocked the student protester for behaving erratically. In the first 24 hours, the post garnered upwards of 2,000 votes (93% upvoted) and 690 comments. Also on April 26th, Twitter user @MikeMa_ posted a short video clip of Yiannapoulos reacting to a clip of the student (shown below). Within 48 hours, the tweet gathered upwards of 2,900 likes and 1,400 retweets.




    Meanwhile, YouTuber Alfred Alfer uploaded an remix featuring clips of the student set to the tune of the song “Dragostea Din Tei” from the viral video Numa Numa (shown below, left). On April 27th, 2016, YouTuber Students of Odin posted an edited clip of the incident titled “The Legend of Trigglypuff,” which subsequently reached the front page of the /r/PoliticalVideo[10] and /r/videos[13] subreddits (shown below).



    The same day, a thread about the event was created on 4chan’s /pol/ (politics) board,[5] where many mocked the student for her attitude and appearance. In a subsequent /pol/ thread, a 4chan user nicknamed the student “Trigglypuff,” a portmanteau of “trigger” and the Pokémon creature Jigglypuff (shown below).[6]



    A thread dedicated to Trigglypuff was created on /pol/ the same day,[7] and was subsequently reposted on the /r/4chan[8] subreddit. Meanwhile on Twitter, many users began mocking the student in tweets accompanied by the hashtag “#TrigglyPuff”.[2]



    On April 28th, Redditor skincube uploaded a parody Garbage Pail Kids trading card of Trigglypuff to the /r/KotakuInAction[12] subreddit (shown below). The same day, the /r/TrigglyPuff[14] subreddit was launched for discussions about the student. Meanwhile, a page titled “Trigglypuff” was launched on Encyclopedia Dramatica.[15]



    Search Interest

    None available.

    External References


    0 0
  • 04/28/16--10:51: Virtue Signalling
  • About

    Virtue Signalling refers to the public expression of an opinion on a given topic primarily for the purpose of displaying one’s moral superiority before a large audience to solicit their approval. Online, the practice is often associated with various platitudes shared on social media that proclaim one’s political affiliation or stance on a variety of hot-button issues related to social justice; it has been criticized by some as a shallow attempt at improving social status within a particular group.

    Origin

    On April 18th, 2015, the British conservative news site The Spectator[1] published an article by writer James Bartholomew titled “The awful rise of ‘virtue signalling’”, which mocked the practice of posting political opinions on social media for the purpose of “indicating that you are kind, decent and virtuous.”

    Precursors

    Within evolutionary anthropology, signalling theory[6] has been used as a framework to explain various forms of communication between humans, including public displays of commitment to solidify membership within a particular group. In the context of religious groups, anthropologist William Irons argued that the use of “ostentatious” signals of commitment improved trust and cohesion within communities, which he used to provide a possible adaptive explanation for various religious rituals and beliefs.

    The similar pejorative karma whore, used as early as January 2000, is often employed in online communities to accuse others of attempting to raise their social standing by pandering to the stereotypical prejudices or trends that are widely accepted by its members.

    Spread

    On July 21st, 2015, Something Awful user Al Cowens used the phrase “virtue signalling” in a thread about a tuba player walking behind a KKK march (shown below).



    On November 5th, 2015, Bartholomew released a short film about virtue signalling, which criticized the practice as a dishonest form of slacktivism (shown below, left). On November 15th, evolutionary behavioral scientist Gad Saad released a podcast describing “hashtag activism” and “flag displays” as examples of virtue signalling, specifically in the context of social media posts following the 2015 Paris Terrorist Attacks (shown below, right).



    On December 24th, the Boston Globe[4] published an article titled “Virtue signalling and other inane platitudes,” which mistakenly cited Al Cowens’ Something Awful post as the earliest use of the term based on an incorrect reporting from the online database Word Spy.[3] On January 4th, 2016, the pop culture blog Acculturated[5] published an article titled “Are You Guilty of ‘Virtue-Signaling’?” The same day, Urban Dictionary user Jizz in butt submitted an entry for “virtue signalling,” defining it as “saying you love or hate something to show off what a virtuous person you are” (shown below). On January 20th, The Guardian[2] published an op-ed piece titled “‘Virtue-signalling’ – the putdown that has passed is sell-by date,” which argued that the term was being overused in order to win political arguments.



    In February, CGP Grey discussed the phenomenon of virtue signalling during an episode of the “Hello Internet” podcast.[4] On April 10th, The Guardian[3] published an article op-ed article by writer Zoe Williams, who likened “virtue signalling” to the pejorative label “champagne socialist,” referring to wealthy people with lifestyles that seem contradictory to their professed socialist political views.

    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 04/28/16--13:11: Headless Women of Hollywood
  • About

    Headless Women of Hollywood is a single topic blog that highlights a variety of movie posters in which the female character’s face is entirely or partially cropped out of the layout.

    Origin

    The Tumblr blog[1] was launched by New York City comedian Marcia Belsky on April 16th, 2016. According to the site description, the project aims to “bring attention to the still standard practice of fragmenting, fetishizing and dehumanizing the images of women we see in film, TV, book covers, and advertisement.”

    Spread

    [work in progress]

    External References


    0 0
  • 04/28/16--17:06: Skateboarding
  • About

    Skateboarding is a sport in which a person rides and performs tricks on a skateboard, which can also be used as a mode of transportation. The sport has experienced many periods of popularity, and has inspired consistent online discussion. One who skateboards is called a skater.

    History

    Skateboarding was first developed in the 1940s and 1950s, when children in America and France began attaching wheels to boxes and planks and riding them around. In the 1960s, many who surfed also became interested in skateboarding, and the sport started to gain a subculture following. In the 1970s, with the advent of polyurethane skateboard wheels, skaters began using the boards for transportation and also sneaking into pools to begin doing complex ramp-style tricks. Many of the first national stars of skateboarding rose to prominence in the 1970s, including Tony Alva, Stacy Peralta, and Ty Page. In addition, the sport began to have major competitions and publications during this time, and was known for being especially popular in California.



    In the 1980s, skateboarding became popular worldwide. It was during this time that skateboarding moved out of the pools, skateparks, and beach-boardwalks of Southern California and in to the urban environments of New York City and other cities. New varieties of skateboarding, including street-style skating, were developed, and new styles of boards were invented. Skateboarding continued its rise in popularity throughout the 1990s and 2000s. Several video games, including the Tony Hawk Pro Skater series were released.



    The debut of the X-Games, an extreme sports competition, brought the sport to even greater popularity. By the 2000s, it was determined that more young people were interested in skateboarding than were interested in playing baseball. At this time, municipalities began building public skateparks, both to keep kids from skating on the street and also to allow them access to ramps and other useful landscapes for doing tricks. Several offline resources for skaters to discuss skateboarding appeared during its rise to popularity, including many magazines like Thrasher.

    Culture

    Skateboarding, while being a fully-fledged institutional sport, is well-known for having an anti-establishment attitude, which dates back to its roots in illegal street skating. However, in a similar manner to Sneakerheads, skateboarding values collectible merchandise, including shoes, apparel, and artistically designed skateboard decks. Brands like Supreme and many others sponsor popular skaters by giving them free gear, which often encourages other skateboarders to become proficient at the sport.



    Some art-covered skateboard decks


    Online Presence

    The reddit community /r/skateboarding has more than 72,000 subscribers, who mostly distribute skate videos and discuss different types of tricks and gear. Skate videos are big part of the discussion of skateboarding; on YouTube alone there are over 2.8 million examples of skate videos of all types.

    Related Memes

    Tillman the Skateboarding Bulldog

    Tillman was an English bulldog who rose to viral fame in 2007 for his exceptional skills at skateboarding and setting the Guinness World Record for “Fastest 100 Meters on a Skateboard by a Dog.” On October 28th, 2015, the celebrity bulldog died from complications of heart disease on October 28th, 2015.



    Skateboarding Professor

    Skateboarding Professor, sometimes referred to as Skating Professor, is an advice animal-style image macro series based on a photograph of University of Nebraska-Lincoln professor Tom Winter riding his skateboard on campus. The captions typically incorporate various technical terms and references relating to skateboarding culture into expressions that are often heard during college lectures.



    Search Interest



    External References


    0 0
  • 04/28/16--20:21: Dat Boi
  • WIP




    About

    “Dat Boi” refers to an image of a 3D green frog riding a unicycle. The image is frequently paired with the words “dat boi!!!!!!” and “o shit waddup!”.

    Origin

    WIP

    Spread

    WIP

    Various Examples



    Search Interest



    External References


    0 0

    About

    Zac Efron’s Baywatch Faceplant is a photoshop meme featuring a picture of actor Zac Efron falling on his head while filming a scene on a beach for the upcoming action comedy film Baywatch.

    Origin

    On April 25th, 2016, the entertainment news site TMZ posted several photographs of actor Zac Efron running down the beach and falling on his head while shooting a scene for the film Baywatch (shown below).



    Spread

    The following day, Efron posted the photograph on Instagram[1] . Within 72 hours, the post gained over 818,000 likes and 18,200 comments.



    On April 26th, Redditor nyan_swanson submitted the photo for viewers to edit on the /r/photoshopbattles[2] subreddit, where it accumulated upwards of 4,800 votes (94% upvoted), 200 comments and many photoshopped variations (shown below).



    On April 27th, Redditor Hug_A_Ginger submitted the original photo to the /r/funny[8] subreddit. Within 48 hours, the post gathered more than 7,700 votes (84% upvoted) and 750 comments. In the coming days, several news sites published articles about the photoshop meme, including Vulture,[3] The Wrap,[4] BroBible,[5] The Daily Dot[6] and UpRoxx.[7]

    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 04/29/16--15:51: Abu Hajaar
  • About

    Abu Hajaar is the jihadist name of an Islamic State militant repeatedly heard in an unedited video clip of a deadly skirmish between a group of ISIS fighters and Kurdish troops that was captured on a headcam by one of the jihadists and later released by VICE News in late April 2016. After the video went viral on the Western social media, many viewers began referencing the name as a way to poke fun at the incompetency of ISIS combatants in the battlefield.

    Origin

    On April 27th, 2016, VICE News[1] released a video clip that shows a group of four Islamic State fighters struggling to hold their position and arguing with each others during an attack against the Kurdish troops in a disputed territory 30 miles north of Mosul, northern Iraq, before the group eventually decides to retreat (shown below). Within the first 72 hours of upload, the video on VICE News YouTube channel garnered over 2.2 million views.



    The dramatic footage, which was captured on a headcam worn by one of the jihadist fighters who ultimately died during the firefight, begins with a band of ISIS fighters loading into several modified armored vehicles to stage an ambush assault against Kurdish troops, though their maneuver is quickly suppressed by enemy rocket fires. As the Kurdish troops continue to put pressure on the group of visibly inexperienced and disoriented jihadists, an argument breaks out as they struggle to use an arsenal of weapons inside the truck, especially one militant who goes by the name “Abu Hajaar.” After repeated failed attempts at returning fire, the fighters begin to retreat from the battlefield, during which the cameraman is fatally shot.

    Spread

    That same day, the video footage was instantly picked up by several news media outlets[3][4][6][7], many of which commented on its rare depiction of chaos, fear and frustration among the Islamic State fighters on the battlefield, in stark contrast to the often heavily-edited footages of militants celebrating their victories featured in propaganda videos.



    Meanwhile on Twitter[2], many viewers began mentioning the name “Abu Hajaar,” one of the fighters who is repeatedly called out by others in frustration as he struggles to hold on to his weapon properly, while others drew humorous comparisons between Abu Hajaar and other characters who notorious for their clumsiness, such as Leeroy Jenkins. Also on April 27th, “Abu Hajaar” and his incompetency in combat was discussed in at least 35 unique threads across various boards on 4chan[8], most notably on /k/ (weapons), /pol/ (politically incorrect) and /int/ (international).

    Search Interest



    External References


    0 0
  • 04/29/16--16:55: Botchamania
  • About


    Botchamania is a long-running series of videos created by Matthew “Maffew” Gregg to spotlight mistakes and funny moments, often called “botches”, in the world of professional wrestling. Maffew’s videos cover many different wrestling promotions, from very popular ones like WWE and NJPW to small backyard federations, and since 2008 Maffew has posted over 300 of the standard Botchamania videos. In addition to the numbered releases, he also posts side videos dedicated to a specific wrestler or event. His videos can be watched earlier on his Patreon, and later can be found on Youtube (with a border to prevent copyright problems), Vimeo, and the official Botchamania website.[1]

    History


    Maffew started Botchamania as we know it in 2008 by uploading a video entitled “Botchamania 4” in response to 3 other Botchamania videos made by other people. Maffew explains that he “watched Botchamania 3 in mid-2007 and thought ‘I could make a better video than this in my sleep’ and made Botchamania 4. I had so many clips left over that I made Botchamania 5, and had so many clips left over from that I made Botchamania 6 and so on and so forth until I made Botchamania 163 and waited 2 months before making the next one.” Maffew eventually went back and re-made Botchamania 1, 2, and 3 himself with better quality. [2]


    In addition to the main Botchamania videos (which often use clips from recent wrestling shows but sometimes include older clips) Maffew has also made compilation videos based on the histories of specific wrestling events, such as Wrestlemania, or on specific wrestlers who are infamous for botches, such as Scott Steiner and Sin Cara.

    Reputation and Online Presence


    As mentioned, Botchamania has become very popular among wrestling fans and wrestlers alike. The videos often get hundreds of thousands of views across all the websites they’re posted. On many occasions, fans at wrestling events have also chanted “BOTCH-A-MANIA!” at the wrestlers in the ring after they make a botch worthy of the show. Botchamania has also been name-dropped by wrestlers themselves on TV on a few occasions. [3]


    Most Botchamania videos open up with a personality from the pro wrestling world (often a wrestler, but sometimes a manager or other personnel) doing a video opener. The openers have ranged from small-time backyard wrestlers to up-and-coming stars to even WWE Hall of Famers such as Mick Foley. Many wrestlers have gladly taken part in the “you are watching Botchamania” opener. [4]


    Maffew has a history of having his Youtube channels deleted quite often. He has gone through over 10 different Youtube channels to post Botchamania videos over the years. But despite the constant channel deletions, Botchamania is still very popular on Youtube and on other video sites and wrestling forums. Maffew’s popularity thanks to the series also got him a spot as a featured contributor to WrestleCrap, a similar site that looks at the worst or funniest parts of pro wrestling. [5]

    Related Memes and Sub-Memes

    The Botchamania Intro

    The intro video, which comes after the “your are watching Botchamania” opener, is often done in a way that imitates nad prodies one of WWE’s show intros. Maffew incorporates many of Botchamania’s most famous one-liners into each intro, and there have been a few versions used over the years and more versions created by fans of the series.

    The Iron Sheik – “FACK!”

    The Iron Sheik is a wrestling legend and WWE Hall of Famer from Iran. He was known for his often insane in-ring promos and his “evil foreigner” heel gimmick. One notable line from a 2007 shoot interview, where he shouted FUCKINGBULLSHIT!” in his thick Iranian accent, has been incorporated into many Botchamania videos and incarnations of the Botchamania intro video. The signature FACK!” is very often the closing line of the videos.



    Scott Steiner – “FAAATASSES!”

    Scott Steiner is a former professional wrestler who wrestled for WCW, WWE and later TNA. Steiner is most known for his insane rambling promos and for allegedly using steroids to achieve his insanely buff physique. The idea that the steroids made him dumber is a popular theory among wrestling fans.



    Two of Scott’s most famous promos, which Maffew often incorporates into Botchamania videos, happened during his tenture with TNA Wrestling. The first was a promo alongside his brother Rick and addressed to Team 3D, where he famously called them FAAATASSES!” and the other is a promo where he used mathematics to claim that he had a “141 and 2/3 chance of winning” an upcoming title match at TNA Sacrifice.


    Zandig – “JEEZUS!” (the CZW lever)

    Zandig is a professional wrestler who is most known for his time in Combat Zone Wrestling. Zandig’s claim to fame in Botchamania comes from an insane promo he delivered after he was beaten down by five opponents from the Hate Club, the most notable part being his overenthusiastic shouting of JEEZUS!”


    In a way similar to the “Walker Texas Ranger Lever” skits once used on the Conan O’Brien show, Maffew often starts a segment involving footage from CZW with someone pulling a lever or pressing a button to trigger Zandig saying “JEEZUS!” Fans have submitted their own “CZW lever” videos and some of them have been used by Maffew.

    Sin Cara – ‘Cartoon Sin Cara’

    Sin Cara is a masked luchador character currently under contract with WWE. The character has been played by two separate luchadors (Mistico and Hunico) since its debut in 2011, but both have shown a strong tendency to botch moves and the Sin Cara character has become a mainstay on the Botchamania channel and website.


    The character debuted in 2011 and was originally played by a luchador named Mistico. After Mistico was suspended for a wellness policy violation later in the year, the Sin Cara character was “stolen” in the storyline by another luchador named Hunico. Mistico returned soon after and the two Sin Caras had a “Mask vs. Mask” match to see who was the real Sin Cara, which Mistico won. Despite this, Mistico would later be released from WWE in early 2014 and Hunico would become the permanent Sin Cara.



    In September 2011, a Tumblr page titled “Your Botchy Neighborhood Sin Cara” [6] was created featuring versions of the famous 60’s Spider-Man meme edited to look like Sin Cara. The captions of the Cartoon Sin Cara meme are similar to the original 60’s Spider-Man meme in spirit, and often poke fun at Mistico’s wellness policy violation or the Sin Cara character’s tendency to botch or get injured. In late 2011, Cartoon Sin Cara was made part of the banner of the Botchamania website, securing Sin Cara’s place in history as one of the most notorious botchers to ever be featured.



    Bryan Alvarez – “MINUSFIVESTARS!”

    Bryan Alvarez is a former professional wrestler, but later gained notoriety as a editor/publisher of wrestling newsletters and as a radio/podcast host. He originally started Figure Four Weekly, which was eventually merged with Dave Meltzer’s Wrestling Observer Newsletter where Alvarez has worked since. He is the co-host of “The Bryan and Vinny Show” alongside Vince Verhei, and that show is the source of Alvarez’s most notable contribution to Botchamania.

    During their review of TNA Victory Road 2009, Bryan and Vinny spoke extremely critically of many of the matches. Bryan insulted the idea that “EARLFUCKINGHEBNER” could beat James Storm to the ring and make a three count, and he famously gave a women’s match on the show a rating of MINUSFIVESTARS!” Maffew included a few clips from Bryan and Vinny’s show into Botchamania 92, which also heavily featured the same TNA event, and the emphasized “MINUSFIVESTARS!” (found at 8:10 in the above video) has been a recurring part of the Botchamania intro ever since.

    Jim Cornette – ‘the Cornette Face’

    Jim Cornette is a former wrestling manager, promoter and booker for many different promotions. He has worked with NWA, WCW, WWE, TNA, Ring of Honor and Global Force Wrestling and has often been criticized for some of his ideas and decision making. In various interviews he has been just as critical of many decisions made by the wrestling promotions he used to work with.



    The Cornette Face is his most notable contribution to Botchamania. this reaction face has been featured in many of Maffew’s videos, usually along with the phrase “Fuck this company!” or some variation.

    Miscellaneous Segments and One-Liners



    Maffew has featured dozens of notable segments and one-liners from wrestling history in his Botchamania videos, far too many to give each one its own section. Some of the notables that are popular include:

    - “Everyone talks… too much.” (a recurring segment in Botchamania which features wrestlers ‘calling their spots’ to set up the match)
    - Japanese Tables never break (often accompanied by Iori Yagami’s maniacal laugh from ‘The King of Fighters’ or James Hetfield from Metallica saying I AM THETABLE in recent times)
    - “SU-PERDRA-GON!” (a reference to an annoying fan repeatedly chanting for a wrestler named Super Dragon even when Super Dragon wasn’t actually there)
    - “IT’S TAZZ!” (as an Oompa Loompa shows up, referencing Tazz’s short stature and very tanned skin)
    - “I’VE BEEN IN THEDANGERZONE!” (said by Macho Man Randy Savage)
    - “HE GOT A BITHYCLE!” (said by Dusty Rhodes with an awful lisp)
    - “HULKHOGAN, WE COMIN’ FORYOU N***A!” (said by Booker T)
    - “Benoit” (used as a censor as a reference to WWE’s attempt to erase Chris Benoit from history)
    - “Never mind that shit… Here comes Mongo!” (a reference to former NFL player and WCW wrestler/commentator Mongo McMichael)
    - “Bobby… Roooooo!” (a reference to TNA announcers mispronouncing the name Bobby Roode, often accompanied by a picture of Roo from Winnie-the-Pooh)

    Search Interest

    (Besides some formatting fixes, the entry should be just about done now. Let me know if I missed anything.)

    External References


    0 0
  • 04/30/16--03:08: ditty.co
  • Work in Progress! Help me out if you know more about this!

    About

    Ditty is a text-to-speech app made by Zya in 2015

    History

    Ditty started off as a third-party Facebook Messenger app that turns text into music. It was used to send singing messages via Facebook chat. On Sep 1, 2015, the app became separate.

    Spread

    (researching!)

    Notable Videos

    Search Interest


    0 0
  • 04/30/16--17:36: Warframe
  • (WIP, accepting editorships. for the love of god someone help me before I jump into an Infested hive)

    About

    Warframe is a co-op multiplayer third-person shooter video game published and developed by Canadian studio Digital Extremes. In the game, players control a member of the Tenno, a race of alien warriors who control Warframes, advanced robot-like entities each with their own unique abilities, thorough various missions and quests throughout the Solar System.

    History

    Warframe originated from a scrapped concept build of DE’s previous 2008 game Dark Sector. In an early trailer [1], many things later used in Warframe can be seen such as the game’s logo, several weapons, and the model for the Excalibur frame and the Grineer enemies. On June 25th, 2012, the official Warframe YouTube channel uploaded a pre-alpha teaser of the game (left).

    Reception

    Clem

    (Clem. Grakata. Clem Clem) That is Clem for WIP.

    External References

    [1]Youtube – Dark Sector Original Trailer


    0 0
  • 05/01/16--16:31: Suzuki Escudo Pikes Peak
  • About

    The Suzuki Escudo Pikes Peak Dirt Trial Car is a motorsport vehicle that took part in the Pikes Peak International Hill Climb in 1998.

    The car is best known for it’s video game appearance in the Gran Turismo series where GT fans remember it for being overpowered and easy to win events with in the Second, Third and Fourth installments.

    History

    In 1998, Suzuki produced the Escudo Dirt Trial for Pikes Peak International Hill Climb event with two 2.5L Twin Turbo V6 engines (One on each front and back) controlling all four wheels with the output of 981 BHP (974 HP) (9000 rpm), making the vehicle able to reach up to speeds of 206 mph (336 km/h), driven by Nobuhiro ‘Monster’ Tajima.

    Appearance in the Gran Turismo series (1999-present).

    The vehicle marked an appearance on the 1999 racing sim Gran Turismo 2. This vehicle is purchasable in the Suzuki Special Dealership for 2,000,000 credits.

    In Gran Turismo 3, this car is purchasable for 1,000,000 credits or can be rewarded to the player if they complete all rally events in Gold. The vehicle can be tuned up to over 1880 BHP (1906 HP) and can reach up to 460 km/h.


    0 0



    About:

    The meme of a Russian couple whispering to eachother about “dirty things”. The woman whispers the man to tell her dirty things as the man responds “kitchen, bathroom, livingroom…”
    The phrase “kitchen, bathroom, livingroom…” can be reweitten to ideas such as a country or city (say, New York), a person, an object, or anything else that can apply word “dirty”; the dialog window can also be completely remade into new phrases.

    Origin:

    The meme was first posted on 1st June 2012. According to the comments, it was created by a couple and their photographer who were just fooling around, later was found within some office workers and was first spread from there. The first people (person?) to find this image were from Spain and turned the meme into “I’m pregnant – I’m sterile” joke.



    The entire joke had lost its attention thereafter and was forgotten.
    Link to the original Facebook post

    Identity:

    On the image you can see two individuals – a man and a woman. The man’s name is Vasily Romantsov, the woman’s name is Irina Romantsova.
    Their profile links as follows:
    Vasily Romantsov (Facebook): Profile
    Irina Romantsova (VK): Profile

    Spread:

    On 23.04.2016 it was posted on a popular Russian social network VK, in a group known as MDK.
    “Tell me something dirty” – “The dishes”. The spread of this image had rapidly increased its popularity:
    It was then re-posted by different popular groups, as “Orlenok”, “Mishka”, etc. with different jokes.



    This image posted on VK

    This was also re-posted by (most likely) their son, Mikhail Romantsov Profile in VK and Profile in Facebook
    His comment: “Interesting, so how did my dad end up in MDK? This image is 5 years old :I”

    Ever since the image had gotten a huge spread around the net.
    First VK, then the original was translated to English, now it can be found in any language.


older | 1 | .... | 259 | 260 | (Page 261) | 262 | 263 | .... | 634 | newer