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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 03/12/16--10:35: Angry Splash Mountain Lady
  • About

    Angry Splash Mountain Lady is a photoshop meme based on a souvenir photograph of a woman frowning with her arms crossed while sitting alone on the Splash Mountain ride at the Walt Disney World Resort in Florida. Since its upload to Imgur in March 2016, the photograph has gone viral on Reddit and spawned a series of photoshopped parodies.

    Origin

    On March 2nd, 2016, Imgur[1] user Blackthorne519 submitted a souvenir photograph of his wife looking dour with her arms crossed on the Splash Mountain ride at Disney World, with the caption reading “Wife got a little perturbed that I wouldn’t accompany her on the ride.” That same day, he uploaded the image to Reddit’s in a /r/funny[2] post titled “I wouldn’t go on Splash Mountain with her.” In the next ten days, the image garnered over 3.1 million views on Imgur and more than 5,000 upvotes on Reddit.



    Spread

    Also on March 2nd, Redditor Laurenz1337 crossposted the original image from /r/funny to /r/photoshopbattles[3] in a post titled “PsBattle: Unamused woman in splash ride.” With the viral reception of the image on Reddit’s photoshopping community came dozens of responses in the comments section of the post, including several mash-ups with other well-known grumpy-looking characters and subjects that have gone viral, such as Grumpy Cat, Mona Lisa, Sad Keanu and the wife of the farmer in the classic painting American Gothic, among many other instances.




    News Media Coverage

    By March 4th, numerous viral media blogs had picked up on the Imgur post, including Distractify[12], Mashable[13], Uproxx[9] and The Daily Dot[14] and BuzzFeed[15], as well as over a dozen of additional articles published by both local and U.S. national news outlets like Syracuse.com[16], CNYCentral[4], ABC News[6], USA Today[7] and The Daily Mail[17] throughout the first week of March 2016.

    Identity

    During this time, the woman depicted in the photo, as well as her husband who uploaded the photograph online, were identified as Jordan and Steven Alexander, a married couple from Syracuse, New York. According to various interviews, Jordan admittedly got upset after her husband bailed out of going on Splash Mountain together, her favorite ride at Disney World, and decided to pose for the grumpiest photograph of her life.



    “It was a long day. I had Bronchitis, I had a crying baby, and my husband informed me that he doesn’t have it in him to ride my favorite ride. […] I kind of practiced it the whole way. And, by the time we got to the last drop I didn’t know where the camera was and so I just guessed and looked over and took the picture and that was that.”

    Upon seeing the souvenir photograph of his wife, Steven Alexander said he couldn’t help but share the priceless image online.

    “When she first showed me the photo, I just lost it. How could you not? I was like, did you coordinate this with them? Because it was so perfect.”

    Examples

    Other notable examples of the photoshop meme include the 2016 United States Presidential Candidates edition, a Facebombed parody and a Creepy John Travolta mashup, as well as a few “Fixed That For You” (FTFY) renditions in which she is shown smiling, pumping her fist in excitement and sporting a pair of post-hangover sunglasses (shown below).





    Search Interest

    [not yet available]

    [2]External References


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  • 03/12/16--11:23: No Es Fake
  • About

    No Es Fake (English: “It is not fake”) is a quote from a post pertaining to information leaks prior to the release of video games Pokémon X and Y in 2013.

    Origin


    The origin pertains to comments made by reputable and reliable leaker and game dataminer, Hirobyte, who often posts online in his first language (Spanish), when confirming and denying specific leaked contents of the Pokémon games during the pre-release period. On 3rd April 2013, Hirobyte, under the handle “F_Lombardi”, posted on Spanish-language forum Elotrolado, to confirm that a recently-revealed new form for classic Pokémon Mewtwo “is not fake”.[1] This was prior to Nintendo’s official announcement of the new monster, and would later turn out to be “Mega Mewtwo Y”.

    The months preceding a Pokémon release are known for being inundated with rumour, hearsay, and oftentimes badly-photoshopped low-quality faked “insider” images. Thusly, the few trustworthy leakers are often looked to for confirmation of the myriad online postings that occur in such periods.

    Hirobyte’s leaks have proved correct on many occasions, such as in 2010 when along with fellow Spanish leaker Melkor, the two effectively revealed the entire roster of new creatures featuring in the games Pokémon Black and White. The leaks are believed to have been possible largely due to their respective employments at the Spanish Official Nintendo Magazine. Hiro also accurately produced fanart of some unseen Pokémon to support these claims.[4][5]

    Perhaps the most famous leak came circa 21st April 2013, when revealing that Fairy type was set to be added to Pokémon in its sixth generation of games. At first boards such as /vp/ were highly sceptical of Hirobyte’s claims, but on 11th June 2013, the Pokémon fandom collectively had a salty meltdown following a Nintendo presentation which revealed that the fairy-type Pokémon were, in fact, not fake.[2]

    Spread

    The phrase sees frequent usage as a shitposting response on message boards and fora such as /v/, /vp/ and GameFAQs, especially when discussing unreleased games.

    The quote was used in several pieces of satirical fan art featuring Sylveon during 2013 during the intense discussion surrounding the leaks.[3]

    Examples

    Search Interest

    Search interest for “no es fake” spiked during 2013 and has seen occasional spikes during further leaks and reveals for Pokémon.

    References


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  • 03/12/16--16:23: #MemeHistory
  • About

    #MemeHistory is a popular hashtag, which uses Black Twitter jokes to explain large events in history, in often a humorous manner. The jokes are suprisingly often related to Christianity

    Origin

    Spread

    Search Interest



    External Reference


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  • 03/12/16--21:06: *** ARTICLE BLOCKED ***
  • ***

    ***

    *** RSSing.com Note: Article removed by member request. ****

    ***

    ***

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  • 03/12/16--22:41: Sway Rapping Group
  • On March 13, 2016 the band called Sway produced their first song entitled, Bootaroni. The song rapidly increased due to the song choice of words in this song and the music video production. During the first three hours it already had 150 views on a brand new channel just for their songs.

    The song, Bootaroni, was created by three people, Brandon, Sam, and Alex. Alex created the beats for the whole song while Brandon and Sam created the lyrics. The song took less than one day to create the lyrics and beats.

    There is currently one song publish on the SWAYxMUSIC channel but a second song is already in the making.


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  • 03/13/16--05:56: The Nostalgia Critic
  • About

    The Nostalgia Critic (abbreviated to NC, often known simply as the Critic) is an Internet personality portrayed by comedian Doug Walker, as well as the name of the similarly named web series where the Critic reacts to and “reviews” bad movies.

    The series launched on YouTube in 2007, but moved to Walker’s website, That Guy with the Glasses. Since 2015, episodes – both new and old – have been uploaded to TGWTG’s new YouTube channel, Channel Awesome, that has nearly 100,000,000 total views.

    Currently, there are more than 300 episodes.


    “Hello, I’m the Nostalgia Critic
    I remember it so you don’t have to.”

    —Nostalgia Critic


    History

    The first episode of Nostalgia Critic was about Michael Bay’s film Transformers and it was uploaded to YouTube in July 3, 2007. (Shown below.)



    In 2008, YouTube had removed several episodes due to copyright infringements, and Doug Walker’s channel got suspended. Following this, he moved all his videos to ThatGuywiththeGlasses.com, which has been rebranded as ChannelAwesome.com.

    In September 2012, it was announced that Nostalgia Critic would “retire”; however, just a few months later, in January 2013, Doug Walker would upload a short sketch titled “Review Must Go On” (shown below), and it was announced that Nostalgia Critic is back.



    Spin-off

    In August 2008, a spin-off for Nostalgia Critic, known as Nostalgia Chick, was announced.

    Search Interest


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  • 03/13/16--09:18: I'm Ethan Bradberry


  • About

    “I’m Ethan Bradberry” is a memorable quote uttered by Ethan Bradberry from the pranking channel MoeAndET (formerly OckTV) as introduction to one of the channel videos. The quote, which was mocked due Ethan’s stoic facial expression and agressive voice tone, was remixed on several videos after a reaction from the channel h3h3 Productions.

    Origin

    On November 25th, 2015, the brothers uploaded a video titled “Would Your Child Know How To Escape A House Fire!? (Social Experiment)”, featuring them using a fog machine to fake a house fire and see how a child would react to that situation. The video started with an overly energetic introduction by the brothers, which was firstly mocked on a video uploaded by YouTuber Watch My Videos?! on December 24th, 2015, gaining over 29,000 views in the following three months.



    On March 3rd, 2016, YouTuber h3h3 Productions uploaded a reaction to Bradberrys’ original video on their secondary channel, where Ethan and Hila Klein mocked the menacing looks of the brothers and their voice tone on the intro, mainly focusing on Ethan. The audio clip was used in the rest of the video, along with a scene where Ethan whips his hair while using the machine. In less than two weeks, the video got over 600,000 views.



    Spread

    h3h3’s video inspired several parodies of the clip. The following day YouTuber VinnytotheK uploaded an edited version of the video, heavily featuring the line and gaining over 18,000 views in the following days. The same day YouTuber Nela uploaded a greenscreen of Ethan shouting his name, which recieved over 50,000 in the following days. As March 13th, searching “i’m ethan bradberry” on YouTube leads to over 1,000 results.[1]



    Various Examples




    Search Interest

    Not available

    External References


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  • 03/13/16--10:42: OckTV / MoeAndET
  • About

    MoeAndET (formely OckTV) is a YouTube channel hosted by the brothers Moe and Ethan Bradberry, and focused on the making of prank and social experiment videos. The channel has been notorious due its “prank in the hood” videos, where the brothers often get attacked by the victims.

    Online History

    [WIP]

    Related Memes

    I’m Ethan Bradberry

    “I’m Ethan Bradberry” is a memorable quote uttered by Ethan Bradberry, which was mocked by Ethan’s stoic expression on his face and agressive voice tone. The quote was remixed on several videos after a reaction from the channel h3h3 Productions.



    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    Pokemon Sun and Moon Cover Parodies refers to a series of exploitable images featuring the logos of the upcoming games from the video game franchise Pokémon, where the logos are imposed over images making them look like video game covers.

    Origin

    {WIP}

    Spread

    {WIP}

    On February 28th, 2016, Tumblr user Greninjaaaa posted a two variants (below) referencing the Super Mario games Super Mario Sunshine and Luigi’s Mansion: Dark Moon.[2] It gained over 7,500 notes in 2 weeks.


    On March 7th, 2016, Twitter user @Woopsire tweeted one (below) featuring Mung Daal from the TV show Chowder.[1] It obtained around 1,000 tweets and likes in about a week.

    Various Examples




    External References

    [1]Twitter – @Woopsire’s picture / March 7th, 2016

    [2]Tumblr – Greninjaaaa’s pictures / February 28th, 2016


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  • 03/13/16--17:28: Umbrelien
  • Editor’s Note: This entry contains minor spoilers for Star Wars Episode VIII, read at your own caution.




    About

    Umbrelien is an unamed alien from Star Wars Episode VllI. He appears in a variety of images from the sets, wearing a fancy suit and holding an umbrella, the name being a combination of Umbrella and Alien.

    Origin

    This unamed character was spotted in the Star Wars set in Dubrovnik by several people, he is one of the two alien races that were spotted on set the other which is compared to the Ayy Lmao meme. Umbrelien was seen holding an umbrella in one image and has been associated with it.



    Spread

    After the images were released to the public, a thread was created in 4chan’s board /tv/, where this character became popular.[1]



    The character has been featured in several edits of Star Wars scenes or characters.

    Notable Examples



    External References


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  • 03/13/16--20:35: Grand Dad
  • Work in Progress



    7 GRANDDAD (better known simply as “Grand Dad”) is an infamous bootleg game supposedly made in 1992. It is a bootleg of the Nintendo Entertainment System game _The Flintstones: The Rescue of Dino and Hoppy.

    Origin

    Information regarding the origin of Grand Dad is sparse and relatively unknown. It originated as an illegal bootlegged Chinese Famicom cartridge (containing an edited version of The Flintstones: The Rescue of Dino and Hoppy) simply titled “(GRANDDAD 3M)” with unidentified Chinese characters (shown below). It is also known that it had at some point arrived in the Russian Federation as an “official” Dendy game called “Super Mario 7.”



    Spread

    With the continuously growing use of emulators and the internet, Grand Dad was eventually spread as a .ROM file, as with many other unofficial NES titles. Throughout the early 2000’s, It was infamous within the bootleg community for its rather simple alterations, and was quickly placed into obscurity. Grand Dad would not be discussed again until September 4, 2014, when Twitch streamer Vargskelethor (better known as “Joel” from Vinesauce) stumbled across the game in a bootleg multicart while streaming pirated NES games.



    Interest of Grand Dad would slowly increase again, and would become a recurring joke particularly within the Vinesauce community.



    Grand Dad would also become a recurring joke in the fake channel “GiIvaSunner” by sneaking and mixing the Flintstones theme within particular video game tracks.



    Search Interest


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  • 03/14/16--13:04: Somebody Ring The Dinkster
  • WIP





    About

    “Somebody Ring The Dinkster” is a quote from the Spy Kids character Dinky Winks uttered after he descends from the sky with a parasol. The clip gained popularity after the YouTube channel Pyrocynical used the clip in a video, the clip has been remixed frequently.

    Origin

    The clip originates from a scene in the movie Spy Kids 3, in which Dinky Winks comes to help the other characters defeat robots.



    Spread

    On December 15th, 2015, YouTuber Pyrocynical uploaded a video titled “WHAT IS THIS”, in which he mocked the scene as an example of how the director could not make a movie as good as Titanic. A video of the scene paired with 9/11 footage uploaded on May 10th, 2015 gained popularity after the video, and has since gained over 30,000 views.



    Various Examples



    Search Interest



    External References


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  • 03/14/16--16:02: Can I Has?
  • Can I Has? The caption “can i has (noun)” is a meme with a picture of a funny dog with the caption can i has (noun)? for example, it could be CAN I HAS UR WALLET? or something like that. The meme was started by a reddit user named “PugglesB”. Some examples can be found here:

    https://imgflip.com/i/10u5q4


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  • 03/14/16--16:30: 2016 Protests in Brazil
  • Overview

    The 2016 Protests in Brazil are a continuation of mass demonstrations against the government Dilma Rousseff (Worker’s Party, PT) started in 2014 and strengthened in 2015.[1] Protesters call for the destitution of the Rousseff, the arrest of former president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva and the continuation of the “Operation Car Wash,” which investigates the biggest corruption scandal in the history of the country.[1]

    Background

    On December 2, 2015, after three massive protests against the federal government, the speaker of the lower house accepted a impeachment request against president Dilma Rousseff. The request was based on charges of lenience towards corruption, fiscal fraud and unauthorized spending.[2] On December 13, new marches supporting the impeachment process erupted, however, drawing fewer people than the previous demonstrations.[3] Immediately after, the organizers announced a new massive demonstration for March 13, 2016.
    On February 2016, Dilma Rousseff, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva and the Worker’s Party were the targets of two new pot-banging protests.[4][5] Several high-profile members and associates of Lula and Rousseff were arrested, including their presidential campaign chief João Santana.[6] Meanwhile, Lula saw his name further implicated in corruption charges. One demonstration erupted into violence when supporters of the Worker’s Party, in larger number, attacked a small group of anti-corruption protesters who were trying to raise the 15m-tall inflatable doll of Lula] Two weeks later, Lula’s house was raided by the Federal Police, and he was forcibly dragged to testify.[8] A team of prosecutors in São Paulo conducting a parallel investigation filed an arrest request against him, which is yet to be judged.[9] These events brought even more public attention to the demonstration scheduled for March 13.

    Notable Developments

    March 13 protests

    On March 13, over 3 million people took the streets in the largest protest in the country’s history. [1] An incomplete survey of the numbers given by the Military Police counted 3.6 million people; organizers spoke of 6.9 million people all over the country. [10] By far, the largest gathering took place in São Paulo, the largest city in Brazil. According to the Military Police, 1,400,000 people flooded the Paulista Avenue in the largest demonstration in the city’s history. [11] Like the previous big demonstrations, the March 13 protests were peaceful, with very few incidents. [11] The fresh demonstrations are expected to put a new pressure on Rousseff’s impeachment process and Lula’s investigation. [11]

    External References

    [1]Fox News Latino – 3M protesters call for Brazilian president’s resignation amid corruption investigations

    [2]Bloomberg Business – Brazil Goes From Crisis to Crisis as Impeachment Bid Begins

    [3]Reuters – Brazilians take to streets to demand Rousseff’s impeachment

    [4]Istoé – Dilma is the target of a new “Panelaço” during TV speech

    [5]Mercopress – Petrobras scandal becomes a mincing machine for the political system

    [6]The Guardian – Brazil president Rousseff’s campaign chief arrested over alleged bribery ties

    [7]Reuters – Brazilians clash after questioning of ex-President suspended

    [8]BBCBrazil Petrobras scandal: Former president Lula questioned

    [9]BBCBrazil prosecutors request arrest of ex-President Lula

    [10]Globo – Mapa das manifestações contra Dilma, 13/03

    [11]BBCBrazil protesters call for President Rousseff to resign


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  • 03/14/16--16:31: Breitbart
  • About

    Breitbart is a conservative news site known for covering Internet news stories related to GamerGate, social justice, political correctness and the United States presidential races.

    History

    In 2007, the website Breitbart.tv was launched by conservative commentator Andrew Breitbart. In 2010, Breitbart launched Breitbart.com, stating it was created to become “The Huffington Post of the right.” In 2012, Breitbart passed away, followed by a major redesign of the site. On October 22nd, BuzzFeed[3] reported that the staff members were struggling over control of the site in wake of Breitbart’s death. In 2014, the company expanded the website with new offices in Texas and London, along with the addition of 12 new staff members.

    Milo Yiannopoulos

    In October 2015, Breitbart writer Milo Yiannopoulos was promoted to the editor of Breitbart Tech.a

    2016 United States Presidential Race

    Michelle Fields Assault Controversy

    On March 11th, 2016, Breitbart reporter Michelle Fields filed a police report claiming that Donald Trump’s campaign manager Corey Lewandowski physically assaulted her while she was at a Trump campaign event.



    On , Breitbart staff writer Ben Shapiro resigned from the site, claiming that the news organization’s management had “sold out” the late founder’s mission “in order to back another bully, Donald Trump.”[2] Meanwhile, Breitbart spokesman Kurt Bardella resigned from the company, echoing Shapiro’s statements that the site was giving favorable coverage to Trump.

    Search Interest

    External References


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    Work in progress


    About

    The Shelby Cobra, popularly known as simply the Cobra, is a cheat unit modeled after the real-life AC Cobra car[1] in the 1999 real-time strategy game Age of Empires II: The Age of Kings that can be spawned by typing “HOW DO YOUTURNTHIS ON” into the in-game chat. It moves extremely quickly and attacks by firing a rapid stream of bullets. As the most well-known cheat unit in the game, it has become an icon of classical video games.

    Origin

    Age of Empires II features a variety of cheat codes[2] that can be used in cheat-enabled games to spawn units, grant resources, and manipulate the game world or players in various ways. Due to its versatility and design, the Cobra established itself as the most popular cheat unit, and became a symbol of cheat codes in Age of Empires.

    The unit can be seen at around 4:32 in the video below:



    Predecessor

    Age of Empires also features a cheat unit resembling a sports car with a person holding a rocket launcher, Winsett’s Z, which can be spawned by typing “BIGDADDY” into the chat. It was modeled after 1995 Chevrolet Camaro Z28[3], and was the strongest unit in the game – possesing incredible speed and the ability to kill most units in just one hit.



    Spread

    Shortly after the game’s release, various internet sites[4][5] published complete walkthroughs, tips and cheats to Age of Empires II, including “HOW DO YOUTURNTHIS ON”, responsible for spawning the Shelby Cobra. The phrase also entered gaming slang and could be seen to turn up on various forums, especially after the release of Age of Empires II: HD Edition.

    Various Examples




    Search Interest


    External References

    [1]Wikipedia – AC Cobra

    [2]Age of Empires Wiki – Cheat Codes

    [3]Age of Empires Wiki – Winsett’s Z

    [4]GameFAQs – AoE II Codes

    [5]Eeggs – AoE Easter Eggs


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  • 03/15/16--12:59: LtCorbis
  • About

    LtCorbis is an 11-year-old video game streamer known for delivering humorous, expletive-ridden commentaries while playing the first-person shooter games Call of Duty and Counter-Strike.

    History

    In June 2015, LtCorbis[2] launched the @LtCorbis Twitter feed, gathering upwards of 11,000 followers in the next eight months. On August 10th, the LtCorbis YouTube[5] channel was created. The first video was posted on December 23rd, featuring a YouTube Poop edit of the “Here in My Garage” advertisement (shown below, left). On February 1st, 2016, she posted a video commenting on the controversy surrounding The Fine Brothers failed “React World” licensing program (shown below, right).



    On February 25th, LtCorbis uploaded a video in which she plays a surfing level in the game Counter-Strike: Global Offensive while retelling an anecdote from an experience at school (shown below, left). On February 29th, she posted a video titled “BuzzFeed Vs. Men,” in which she criticized a BuzzFeed Canada editor who was accused of discriminating against white male job applicants while playing Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare (shown below, right).



    On March 8th, LtCorbis published a video mocking those who refer to YouTube commentary channels as “Leafy clones” (shown below, left). On March 11th, she posted a video criticizing vlogger Jacob Sartorius for being “cancer” (shown below, right).



    Reception

    On March 9th, Redditor Pyrocrapanal posted an LtCorbis video about originality on YouTube to the /r/pyrocynical[6] subreddit. On March 10th, 2016, YouTuber Pyrocynical praised LtCorbis in a video regarding inauthentic vloggers on the site, gathering more than 375,000 views and 6,100 comments in the next five days (shown below).



    “There’s a little girl here who is 11-years-old and she’s already mastered the art of memes and memeing and the fact that she can say this intellectual stuff at such a young age, it’s really good but really worrying at the same time. She will probably grow up and work at Reddit or something and be like a memeologist or, I don’t know, whatever intelligent kids do when they’re young.”

    The following day, The Daily Dot published an article about LtCorbis titled “This sweary, savvy, 11-year-old gamer girl is the future of YouTube.” Also on March 11th, the /r/LtCorbis[4] subreddit was launched for discussions about the YouTube channel. On March 12th, an entry for LtCorbis was created on the YouTube Wiki.[1]

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]YouTube Wiki – LtCorbis

    [2]Twitter – @LtCorbis

    [3]Twitter – @samfbiddle

    [4]Reddit – /r/LtCorbis

    [5]YouTube – LtCorbis

    [6]Reddit – Pyro – this 11-year-old girl is a better leafy clone


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  • 03/16/16--09:06: Unreal Engine
  • About

    Unreal Engine is a game engine created by Epic Games and released for free use by game developers interested in making first-person shooters, MMORPGs, and other popular game types. Because it’s code is based in C++, which makes it easy to learn, it became popular with game developers. Upon the release of version 4, Epic Games announced that the software would become free to all interested parties.

    History

    The Unreal Engine was first developed by Epic Games for the production of the game Unreal in 1998. The engine was created to be used to develop a range of games, so that game developers would not have to build an entirely new basis for game physics each time they wanted to develop a game. Features of the original engine included integrated rendering, collision detection, AI, visibility, networking, scripting, and file system management, as well as an advanced rasterizer. It also included a scripting language called UnrealScript, which made it easy for users to mod, and a stable release including this feature was made publicly available for a fee in 2000. The engine was compatible with a range of operating systems, including Microsoft Windows, Linux, Mac OS and OS X, Dreamcast, and PlayStation 2.



    Version 2 was released in 2001, with a completely rewritten set of core code and increased support for a variety of other operating systems and also an increased support for ragdoll physics, as well as vehicle physics. Version 3 was released in 2004, and had much more support for lighting and shader systems, soft body dynamics, iPod touch functionality, Steamworks integration, and stereoscopic 3D. In November 2009, Epic Games released a version of UE3’s software development kit to be available to the general public, instead of just those who had licensed it for the development of specific games.



    Version 4

    Unreal Engine 4 was released in 2012, but it had been in development since 2003, even before the initial release of Unreal Engine 3. One of the largest changes was in the time it took for the builds to compile; some minor builds were able to be compiled in 30 seconds, as opposed to 15 minutes. This made it much easier for developers to iterate through changes, and test new ideas. Along with other updates in the software’s tools and increased support for even more operating systems, this change was acclaimed by game developers, who applauded the release of Unreal Engine 4.



    In 2014, Epic Games announced that it would change the model of how people could use Unreal Engine, opening the software up to a subscription model of $19.95 a month for anyone who was interested in using it. They also began to offer grants from a large fund to people who came up with innovative uses for the software, encouraging people to use it for development and experimentation even outside the gaming world. In 2015, Epic announced that the software would now be available to anyone for any use for free, with the caveat that if a user released a commercial product, they would need to pay a royalty for the use of the software.

    Reception

    Unreal Engine is very highly regarded by game developers, and each successive release has won awards and accolades from the industry. In addition, it is the current holder of the Guinness World Record for “most used video game engine.” There are over 257,000 results on YouTube for Unreal Engine video playthroughs.

    Related Memes

    Goat Simulator

    Goat Simulator is a third-person perspective video game in which the player roams an open world assuming the role of a wild goat.



    Search Interest



    External References


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  • 03/16/16--10:27: Face Swap Live
  • About

    Face Swap Live is a mobile application that superimposes a variety of celebrity faces over the user’s face in real time. Videos and GIFs of people using the application are often posted to YouTube and Reddit.

    History

    On December 16th, 2015, developing house Laan Labs launched the app Face Swap Live for iPhone, which allowed people to swap faces instantly in video, and to use a photo library to swap faces with celebrities.[2] On January 13th, 2013, The Washington Post[3] posted an article about Face Swap Live, referring to it as the “app that launched a thousand memes.”

    Online Presence

    On YouTube

    On January 27th, 2016, YouTuber “PewDiePie”: posted a video of himself using the application (shown below, left). The same day, Jenna Marbles posted a similar video (shown below, right). Within two months, the videos gained over 3.4 million and 2.5 million views respectively.



    On February 1st, YouTuber Miranda Sings posted a video in which she uses the app to face swap with other YouTubers (shown below, left). On February 6th, YouTuber Markiplier posted a video in which he FaceSwaps with YouTuber JackSepticEye (shown below, right). Within six weeks, the videos garnered upwards of 1.7 million and 2.2 million views respectively.



    On Reddit

    On December 29th, 2015, Redditor NiGoL1 submitted an animated GIF of a man using the app while holding a baby (shown below). In two months, the post gained over 5,800 votes (91% upvoted) and 320 comments on the /r/gifs[1] subreddit.



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Reddit – Science has gone too far

    [2]iTunes App Store – Face Swap Live

    [3]Washington Post – Behind the scenes of Face Swap Live


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  • 03/16/16--14:22: #LetsBlamePOTUSForThisToo
  • About

    #LetsBlamePOTUSForThisToo is an ironic hashtag used on Twitter to make humorous allusions to Barack Obama being blamed for policy decisions he has no control over, similar to the meme Thanks, Obama.. POTUS is the generally-used abbreviation for President of the United States of America.

    Origin

    The hashtag was begun by comedy writer Adrienne Watson on March 15th, 2016, as part of a rotating game called The Brainwave Bonanza, which is run by an app called The Hashtag Roundup. Each round, a different Her first post using the hashtag received 75 likes and 38 retweets, and other participants in the game joined in quickly.



    Spread

    Throughout the morning, participants in the hashtag game used #LetsBlamePOTUSForThisToo, many earning tens of favorites and retweets.



    By noon, more followed users, like the SiriusXM radio host John Fugelsang, were participating in the hashtag; his tweet earned more than 248 likes and 160 retweets. Another popular twitter personality, Kabir Iyengar, used the hashtag in several different tweets, all of which earned over 200 retweets, furthering the popularity of the hashtag. By the end of the day the hashtag was trending in America with over 17,000 tweets, many of which were collected by the Observer and AJ+, the viral video arm of Al Jazeera.



    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    Not yet available

    External References


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