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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 12/31/15--13:28: Novelty Content Filters
  • About

    Novelty Content Filters are browser extensions that filter keywords, images or other web content from being displayed, which are typically created to black out mentions of controversial figures and ubiquitous celebrities.

    Origin

    On May 17, 2010, Greg Leuch from the Free Art & Technology released the “Shaved Bieber"[1] web browser extension, which blacks out any mentions of Justin Bieber along with any pictures of the pop star.



    Spread

    On June 1st, 2010, Leuch collaborated with the interactive agency Jess3[3] to launch the Oil Spill Plugin, which removes mentions of the oil company BP from websites. December 2012, Leuch released a follow-up app titled “Pop-Block,”[4]which allows users to block custom keywords from appearing in their browser window (shown below).



    In April 2015, entrepreneur James Shamsi released the Kardblock[5] browser extension to block mentions of Kim Kardashian within web browsers.



    On December 24th, programmer Rob Spectre released the Trump Filter[2] Chrome extension, which removes mentions of “Donald Trump”: from being displayed on various websites (shown below). According to Spectre, the extension received over 21,000 downloads with over 62,000 filtered Trump mentions in the first week.



    Search Interest

    Not available

    External References

    [1]Fat Lab – Shaved Bieber

    [2]Trump Filter – Trump Filter

    [3]Jess3 – Oil Spill Plugin

    [4]Pop-Block – Pop-Block

    [5]Chrome – Kardblock


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  • 12/31/15--18:37: Psycho Dad
  • This entry is unrelated to Married… With Children.

    About

    Psycho Dad is a nickname given to McJuggerNugget’s father Jeffrey Ridgway Sr. for his serious anger issues and damaging property in anger without giving a care, similar to Angry Grandpa.

    Origin

    The first Psycho video in the series was posted on December 22nd, 2012. The video starts with McJuggerNugget’s brother BigBrudda filming him playing XBOX 360 on his dad’s television when he is told not to. Psycho Dad shows up to argue with McJuggerNuggets, unplugging his XBOX 360 and putting it in the fireplace as McJuggerNuggets quickly took it out. Psycho Dad takes the XBOX 360 again and goes outside to break it by tossing it. Freaking out, McJuggerNuggets freaked out even more when his brother finds out he’s recording him and his reactions. The video gain millions of views in a few days and becomes a series.



    Psycho Series

    Besides Psycho Dad, some family members are include in the Psycho series such as Psycho Kid, Psycho Brother, Psycho Girlfriend, and Psycho Mom.






    Related Memes

    For Security

    For Security is a catchphrase used for responding to people questioning in comments. It was first said by Psycho Dad when he got security cameras for his birthday.

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]YouTube – McJuggerNuggets

    [2]YouTube – Psycho Series Playlist

    [3]Google Search – Psycho Dad


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    About

    Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee is a web series in which comedian Jerry Seinfeld interviews other comedians while driving a series of vintage cars.

    History

    The show debuted as a web series, distributed by the Sony-owned online streaming web site Crackle on July 19th, 2015. The first episode featured Larry David, the co-writer of the show Seinfeld, riding in a 1962 Volkswagen Beetle.[1]



    In a 2012 interview with the Huffington Post, Seinfeld explained the impetus of the show:[2]

    “I think I first started playing around with this kind of thing in 2002 with my “Comedian” documentary. Colin Quinn and I did a commentary as a DVD extra and I was kind of amazed at how funny it was. You know, it was just us sitting there talking. Then I bought this VW Bug in Albuquerque, New Mexico and went to pick it up with my friend Barry Mardar and we videotaped ourselves driving back. And so those two experiences plus the “Comedian” documentary itself really had a lot of just comedians talking, although it was more talking shop than what you would call the usual stand-up comedian nonsense talking that we do quite a bit of.”

    As of December 31st, 2015, the show has had seven separate seasons, and been renewed for nine. According to the New York Times, the show has been streamed over 100 million times as of May 2015.[3]

    Format

    Each episode begins with Jerry Seinfeld explaining the history of the car he is about to ride in. He then picks up the comedian at a meaningful location, sometimes allowing his guest to drive the car. Then, he and his guest engage in an unscripted conversations; since the guests are generally professional acquaintances of his, they are able to have a relaxed conversation with good rapport. To continue the conversation, Seinfeld stops at a local restaurant, often a favorite of the guest, to have a cup of coffee.[1]

    Guests of Seinfeld have included Mel Brooks, Ricky Gervais, Sarah Silverman, Chris Rock, Seth Myers, David Letterman, Louis CK, Aziz Ansari, Jon Stewart, Amy Schumer, Steven Colbert, and the entirety of the original cast of Seinfeld, among many other lesser-known comedians. Most recently, with the premiere of the seventh season on December 31st, 2015, Jerry Seinfeld drove a 1963 Corvette Sting Ray with Barack Obama.[4]



    Cars Jerry Seinfeld has driven on the show have included Ferraris, Mustangs, Spyders, Aston Martins, Porches, Gremlins, and a DeLorean, mostly dated between the mid-1950s and mid 1980s.

    Criticism

    In early 2014, Jerry Seinfeld was asked why he didn’t feature more women or people of color on the show by Buzzfeed reporter Peter Lauria. He responded "“This has gotta represent the actual pie chart of America? Who cares? Funny is the world that I live in. You’re funny, I’m interested. You’re not funny, I’m not interested. I have no interest in gender or race or anything like that.”[10] Many criticized the comment, saying that there were plenty of diverse comedians that Seinfeld was choosing not to represent. Kyle Chayka of Gawker wrote, “In conclusion: Yes, comedy should represent the entire pie chart of America, and the glorious, multicolored diversity pie should be thrown directly at Jerry Seinfeld’s face.”[11]

    Online Presence

    The show maintains both a dedicated web site,[5] which contains all the streaming episodes, as well as a channel on Crackle,[4] Sony’s dedicated streaming media site. In addition, a subreddit[6] for the show was formed on February 3rd, 2014 and has accrued about 260 readers; many also discuss the show in the /r/seinfeld subreddit.[7] The show’s Facebook topic page has over 27,000 likes,[8] and the official Twitter has over 14,800 followers.[9]

    Search Interest



    External References


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  • 01/01/16--01:19: Kancolle sleep/ Kagaposting


  • About

    “Kancolle Sleep” refers to various images from the online card game Kantai Collection. The most commonly feature chibi art of the Aircraft carrier Kaga by Pixiv artist Rebecca[1]

    “Kagaposting” refers to posts about the Aircraft Carrier Kaga on 4chan. These posts very frequently use Kancolle sleep images.

    Origin

    Rebecca began drawing Aircraft Carrier Kaga and the commonly paired Aircraft Carrier Akgai in 2013 [2]. Initially starting with comics, Rebecca later started to draw more macros. The phrase “sleep” refers to Kaga’s in game lines, some of which mention that she is sleepy [3]

    Spread

    Translations of the original Rebecca images began to pop up on Kantai collection threads on 4chan in late 2013 [4]. Mutations of said images also began to occur. While the most common phrase associated with the image is “It’s time to sleep” other variants would say things such as “It’s time for tea”. Likewise, the original phrase would get edited into other art that was completely unrelated to Rebecca’s.

    Due to the nature of people posting these images, as well as many people appearing to be large fans of Kaga in general there also began backlash. Images and posters of said images are sometimes called “Autism” or “Rebecancer”



    Various Examples




    External References

    [1]Pixiv – Rebecca

    [2]Pixiv – 赤城さんと加賀さんの日常

    [3]Kancolle Wikia- Kaga

    [4]Warosu – Thread 11608808’

    [5]Desu Storage – thread 133513020


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  • 01/01/16--13:35: 420chan
  • Work in progress.




    About

    420chan is a English imageboard created by Kirtaner.[1] Mostly focused on the discussion of recreative drug use (mostly cannabis) and professional wrestling, the board has become one of the most popular alternate imageboards to 4chan in the English net.

    History

    [WIP]

    420chan was created in April 20th, 2005, by Something Awful forums member Kirtaner, when he registered the domain “420chan.org” as a joke. However, the administrators of the already existing imageboard 420chan.net complained about Kirtaner using the same name for his domain, resulting into the developement of 420chan.org as a real imageboard.[2]

    Features

    [WIP]

    Highlights

    TCC-Tan / Mascots

    TCC-Tan is the main mascot of 420chan, represented as a stoner girl in underwear with a giant water pipe on her back. Originally created by vanessie from Something Awful, she was added into 420chan’s deafualt theme as titled background image.[6] This inspired fan art of her, along with the use of the original ilustration as exploitable.



    Aside of TCC-Tan, the site has several mascots, mostly for individual ones, some of the most notable ones include:

    “Bikko”is the unofficial mascot of /smoke/, the tobacco discussing board. Originally made by the doujin artist ‘Romantic Fool Since 1995’ and featured on the hentai manga Kesson Shoujo, she gained a fanbase on several communities.[7]

    Traffic

    According the net analysis page Alexa, 420chan is among the 30,000 most visited pages in United States, and among the 60,000 most visited pages worldwide.[5]

    Search Trends

    External References

    [1]420chan-org – Main page

    [2]Chans Wiki – 420chan

    [3]Taimapedia – Complete history of 420chan

    [4]Taimapedia – Main page

    [5]Alexa – 420chan.org

    [6]Taimapedia – TCC-Tan

    [7]My Sword Is Unbelievably Dull – This is Bikko, and You Can Help Us Bring Her To Life


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  • 01/02/16--06:15: We Bought Two Cakes
  • Work in progress


    About

    We Bought Two Cakes, also shortened to Two Cakes, is a meme originating from the Hasbro animated series My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic. Typically featuring a still frame of the character of Fluttershy wearing an odd expression, it exists as an exploitable meme and a reaction image series, and has spawned a large volume of tribute art.

    Origin

    The still frame used in examples of the meme are taken from episode 7 of season 5 of the Friendship is Magic series, “Make New Friends But Keep Discord”.[3]



    The first submission of the meme to the MLP image hosting site Derpibooru was of a short GIF of the original scene,[1] including Fluttershy making the face. The image was submitted on May 16th, 2015.



    Spread

    Various Examples




    External References


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  • 01/03/16--02:02: CCleaner
  • CCleaner takes a while to erase all our porn cache…


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  • 01/03/16--14:44: Green Day
  • Green Day is an American punk rock band formed in 1986 by vocalist/guitarist Billie Joe Armstrong and bassist Mike Dirnt. For much of their career, the band has been a trio with drummer Tré Cool, who replaced former drummer John Kiffmeyer in 1990 prior to the recording of the band’s second studio album, Kerplunk (1992). In 2012, guitarist Jason White became a full-time member after having performed with the band as a session and touring member since 1999.


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  • 01/04/16--05:11: Confuse schoolgirl
  • this happen when teacher told us to do a work as a partner and this person come to me


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  • 01/04/16--08:41: Things Organized Neatly
  • About

    Things Organized Neatly is a single topic blog that curates a series of user-submitted and artists’ photographs in which an assortment of everyday objects are meticulously arranged in a visually satisfying display, with focus on elements of design, composition and symmetry.

    Origin

    The Tumblr blog was launched by Indianapolis-based designer and photographer Austin Radcliffe on April 3rd, 2010. According to Radcliffe, he began the photo blog as a way to satisfy his own penchant for the art of object arrangement, as well as to curate other artists’ illustrations and photographs that exemplify visual organization and symmetrical composition.



    Spread

    By mid-April 2010, Radcliffe’s photo blog project had drawn 150 new followers in the short span of a week. Sometime in late July to early August that same year, Things Organized Neatly began to gain viral momentum on the microblogging network, with an image of a neatly arranged pencil carvings racking up more than 1,000 notes after it was posted on August 1st, 2010 (shown below). Over the course of the next five years, the Tumblr blog’s online presence grew exponentially with an estimated subscription base of more than 300,000 followers.



    Accolades

    In January 2012, TIME Magazine[3] highlighted the blog as “a perfectionist’s dream Tumblr” in its list of 30 Must-See Tumblr Blogs. In October 2015, Things Organized Neatly received the honor of the People’s Choice Webby Award in the Personal Blog/Website category.[8]

    Examples




    Book Adaptation

    In mid-2015, Radcliffe announced that a select compilation of images from his blog will be published as a photography art book titled Things Organized Neatly: The Art of Arranging the Everyday, which is slated for release on March 1st, 2016.



    Search Interest



    External References


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  • 01/04/16--14:53: WE WUZ KINGS
  • About

    WE WUZKINGZ/KANGZ N SHIET is an expression originated on 4chan’s Politically Incorrect board /pol/, the phrasing is primarily used in mocking the Black Egyptian Hypothesis, a theory that is popular within certain groups of African Americans. The meme is now widely used on /pol/ and occasionally on white supremacist websites.

    Background

    The Black Egyptian Hypothesis[1] is a theory claiming that Egypt was a Black Civilization, historically questioning the specific race of the Ancient Egyptian Civilization and affirming that there was a racially black majority. The theory is still contested among many historians. This hypothesis gained popularity among some African Americans during the Counter-Culture movement, and to this day the belief that Egyptian and other successful civilizations had a black majority is still believed by many.

    In 1991, Reverend Al Sharpton was quoted in a speech at Kean College stating that"White folks was in caves while we were building empires…. We taught philosophy and astrology and mathematics before Socrates and those Greek homos ever got around to it."[2]. Further reinforcing the theory that Blacks historically once had an advantage on White Europeans regarding Technological innovation and development.

    Origin

    The origins of this meme are widely believed to have been originated from /pol/ on 4chan, users who became increasingly critical of African Americans started using this phrase in order to mock stereotypes of Blacks who believe in said hypothesis. It is believed to have gained traction around late year 2015.

    Spread

    Encyclopedia Dramatica[3] states that the phrase was originated at around November 2015. On November 21st 2015, a video called “we wuz kings and shit fam” was uploaded to Youtube.

    The phrase became a common shitpost after Kendrick lamar’s album “To Pimp A Butterfly”,(which often compares black people to kings as with the track “King Kunta”) became Popular on 4chan.

    External References

    [1]Wikipedia – Black Egyptian Hypothesis

    [2]Wikiquote – Al Sharpton


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  • 01/04/16--14:59: Today I Learned (TIL)
  • About

    Today I Learned, often shortened as TIL, is an online expression typically used in the title of a post or discussion thread when introducing an interesting fact or trivia that had been previously unknown to the poster, in a similar vein to the phrase “did you know?”

    Origin

    While the exact origin of “TIL” as the three-letter acronym for “today I learned…” remains unclear, the phrase itself most likely began seeping into everyday online vernacular through its usage on social news aggregation sites Reddit and Digg sometime in April 2007, according to Google Trends. On December 28th, 2008, Redditor nix0n created /r/TIL[1], a subreddit where community members are encouraged to spontaneously share “interesting and specific facts” that they had just found out about, in contrast to general knowledge that they had intently looked up.

    Spread

    On August 20th, 2009, Urban Dictionary user zBriGuy submitted the earliest known acronymic definition for “TIL” (shown below).[2]



    In February 2010, the official Twitter feed[8] for the /r/TIL subreddit was set up, followed by the launch of the Tumblr blog[4] in June 2012 and the official Facebook page[7] in August that same year. In mid-May 2011, the moderators of /r/TIL announced that the acronym “TIL” would be phased out in favor of the phrase “todayilearned” for the name of the subreddit.[10]

    Examples

    As of January 2016, the /r/todayilearned subreddit commands nearly 10 million subscribers and there are a total of seven /r/todayilearned posts that have accrued more than 10,000 upvotes.




    Search Interest



    External References


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    Overview

    The Malheur National Wildlife Refuge Standoff is a militia occupation of a federal building in the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Burns, Oregon, undertaken on January 2nd, 2016 by several armed independent militias, to defend a family of ranchers against further imprisonment for an arson the family had already been sentenced for. The standoff received a large amount of attention by the news media and on social media.

    History

    Dwight Hammond is a rancher in Harney County, Oregon with his son Steve; much of their land borders federal property.[1] After setting a series of fires on the federal property in 2012, which federal prosecutors claimed were to cover up illegal deer poaching and illegal backburn and the ranchers claimed were to stop invasive plants, the Hammonds were sentenced to serve five years in prison each, but an appeals judge shortened the terms to three months for the 73 year-old Dwight and one year for Steve.[2] After they were released, a U.S. District court in Oregon said that the term shortening was illegal, and sentenced the pair to return to prison to fulfill the rest of their sentences. The pair were ordered to return to prison on January 4th, 2016.[3]

    To protest the sentencing, a petition began circulating under the hashtag #SaveTheHammonds. As of January 4th, 2016, over 14,000 have signed the petition, which was originally created in late September, 2015.[4] One of those who saw the petition was another rancher named Ammon Bundy, who, along with his father Cliven Bundy, leads an armed anti-government militia.[5] The pair contacted the Hammonds and pledged their assistance. While the Hammonds publicly claimed they did not want the assistance of the armed militias,[6] Ammon Bundy called for the militias to convene Burns in a Facebook video,[7] and on Saturday, January 2nd, an assemblage of armed militiamen marched on the headquarters of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge.[8]



    Some of Ammon Bundy’s videos calling for Militiamen to converge on the Malheur building.

    Later that day, they began occupying the building, which was unoccupied. Their stated goals are for the Hammonds to be released and for the government to relinquish control of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge.[9]

    Notable Developments

    #OregonUnderAttack

    After the armed militiamen occupied the central building, many began using the hashtag #OregonUnderAttack[10] to describe the event and discuss it on social media. One major critique accused law enforcement of racial bias when it came to the attackers; many Twitter users complained that if the protestors were black and armed, they would have been attacked by law enforcement in the manner of the many recent police brutality controversies that had been publicly debated over the previous three years. Roland Martin, a prominent television personality, wrote “Did I miss the call for the national guard in Oregon? I recall them in Ferguson and Baltimore. #OregonUnderAttack,” comparing the protests in Oregon to those that followed the deaths of Michael Brown and Freddie Gray, in which the National Guard and a militarized police presence descended on those cities after large and mostly peaceful protests.[11]



    #YallQaeda

    Another criticism of the militiamen on Twitter compared the men to domestic terrorists operating under radical faith in the same manner as ISIS or Al Qaeda, although in this case, the faith was Christianity instead of Islam. Several hashtags, including #YallQaeda, #Yeehawd, #VanillaISIS, White ISIS, #YokelHaram, and #Talibundy were suggested, with the first three going into wide use.[12]



    Search Interest


    External References


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  • 12/30/15--10:33: "Come On, It's 2015"
  • About

    “Come On, It’s 2015”, sometimes iterated as >[Current Year] or “It’s 2015,” is a catchphrase expression often said by users on 4chan’s /pol/ (politically incorrect) board to mock English comedian and pundit John Oliver’s frequent resort to reminding his viewers of the present year as a straw man argument against ideas and beliefs which he deems to be old-fashioned or conservative.

    Origin

    Mentioning the present year has long been used by liberals as a rhetorical device to promote progressive agendas and dismiss conservative beliefs, particularly in the context of issue-specific political debates, with the earliest known online satire of the phrase attributed to an Onion article published in February 2014 with the headline “Report: Stating Current Year Still Leading Argument For Social Reform” (shown below, left). However, the phrase “I mean, come on people, it’s [current year]” became a popular fodder for mockeries in late 2015 after it was recognized by users of 4chan as a signature line associated with John Oliver on his late-night TV talk show Last Week Tonight; the oldest 4chan parody of the expression as used by John Oliver can be found in a /tv/ (television & film) thread submitted on September 3rd, 2015 (shown below, right).



    Spread

    On September 29th, 2015, Bodybuilding Forums user PissBeerBreh highlighted the satirical use of the phrase on 4chan in a discussion thread titled “Come on!!!! It’s 2015!!!!!!!!!!!™.” In the thread, the original poster (OP) openly criticizes John Oliver’s resort to the expression as a logical fallacy:

    The argument is literally this: “We are living in a year.”

    So because we’re living in 2015, you need to check your privilege and agree with them or you’re a racist bigot homophobic cisshet Islamophobic conservative trans hating KKK member of Westboro Baptist Church.


    In the following months, numerous discussion threads addressing the popularity of the expression emerged on other 4chan boards, including /pol/ (politically incorrect), /a/ (anime & manga) and /v/ (video games), where many users similarly began poking fun at the cliched nature of the phrase and dubbed John Oliver the “Le 2015 Man.”

    By the end of 2015 the expressions started to gain even more popularity, with /pol/ users joking about how John Oliver would get increasingly stressed that 2015 would end. Many threads were created mocking the British Comedian on 4chan boards. Many of these threads eventually were shared on the 4chan subreddit. On New Years Day 2016, user /u/aleon33 shared “Some of you liberals are alright…”[13] on /r/4chan, the post quickly reached the frontpage and as of January 5th 2016 has accumulated about 4894 upvotes and 559 comments.


    Examples




    Usage in Politics

    The phrase has been also frequently employed by a multitude of liberal politicians, most notably Barack Obama and Justin Trudeau, as well as many activists in the social justice blogosphere in defense of a wide range of politically progressive agendas.



    Search Interest



    External References


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    About

    The Manchester New Year’s Photo is a photoshop meme based on a photograph taken during 2016 New Year’s Eve revelry in Manchester, England.

    Origin

    On January 1st, 2016, the Manchester Evening News in Manchester, England published a photo slideshow documenting the party atmosphere and urban celebrations surrounding the New Year of 2016, titled “New Years Eve 2016 – party, party, party.”[1] The slideshow featured 31 photographs by Evening News photographer Joel Goodman, many of which depicted Manchester residents in various states of intoxication. The 20th image in the slideshow was captioned “Police hold on to a man while another lies in the road.”[1]



    Spread

    Later that same day, BBC senior news producer Roland Hughes tweeted the photograph, comparing the high level of drama with that of a beautiful painting. As of January 5th, 2015, the tweet has received over 25,600 retweets and 29,600 favorites.[2]



    Due to Hughes’ reference to painting in the image, many respondents to the tweet began altering the image to produce painting-like results. One of the first to do so, shortly after Hughes’ originally tweet was the user GroenMNG,[3] who detailed the way in which the photograph reflected what’s known as The Golden Ratio or The Fibonacci Spiral, a mathematical concept that is also used in painting to determine balanced compositions.[4] This second image received more than 860 retweets and 1,000 favorites. Later that day, the photograph was submitted to three notable subreddits: /r/pics,[5] where it received 2,399 points (89% upvoted); /r/accidentallrenaissance,[6] where it received 497 points (91% upvoted); and /r/photoshopbattles,[7] where it received 187 points (93% upvoted) and 48 replies.

    The story of the photo was covered widely by news outlets, including the Daily Mail,[8] the Independent,[9] and the Guardian.[10] In addition, Hughes himself wrote a story for the BBC blog about how his tweet caused the photo to become a viral hit.[11]

    Notable Examples



    External References


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    About

    Petro Poroshenko’s The Economist Cover is a photoshop meme that became popular after the President of Ukraine, Petro Poroshenko, tweeted a cover of an annual book released by the magazine The Economist where his face had been photoshopped over the face of Russian President Vladimir Putin.

    Origin

    On December 1st, 2016, the Economist, a political and financial magazine, released their annual book, which contains their predictions and explorations of world issues in the new year.[2] The cover featured a series of portraits of world leaders arranged in the foreground, with other figures arranged in the background. Second from right, in the first row, was Russian President Vladimir Putin. In early January, 2016, Petro Poroshenko, the President of the Ukraine allegedly tweeted a photo of a photoshopped copy of the book in which his face had been photoshopped to replace Putin’s, and the year had been changed to 2017. The accompanying text read “Some of the gifts are not perceived as a compliment, but as a personal responsibility.” The tweet was later deleted.[2]



    Spread

    Soon after the original tweet, on January 3rd and 4th, Russian users began photoshopping Poroshenko into other magazine covers or situations where he could be seen as having an inflated self-worth,[3] including substituting the Ukranian president for world figures like Yuri Gagarin (the Russian first man in space), Caitlyn Jenner (the first transgendered person to be on the cover of Vogue, and adding his face to the moon and Mount Rushmore. The edit trend was covered worldwide, in both Russian-language and English-language news sources.[4]

    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    not yet available

    External References

    [1]Twitter – Petro Poroshenko’s Tweet

    [2]The Economist – The World in 2016#

    [3]Twitter – Search: Порошенко, images

    [4]Korrespondent – Из Twitter Порошенко удалили фейковый The Economist

    [5]RT – “Poroshenko posts pic of himself photoshopped in Putin’s place, then Russians see it… (MEMEWAR)”https://www.rt.com/news/327907-poroshenko-economist-putin-photoshop/


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    About

    “You make my kokoro go doki doki”, sometimes written as “my kokoro goes doki doki”, “you make my heart go doki doki”, or “my heart goes doki doki”, is a phrase used to express feelings of love or admiration. “Kokoro” translates to heart, and “doki doki” translates to the sound of a heart beating in Japanese.

    Origin

    The earliest reference found is from Yahoo! Answers [1], indexed by Google on January 15th, 2012.

    Spread

    An Urban Dictionary definition for “my kokoro goes doki doki” [2] was submitted by user Kokodoki on February 8th, 2012.

    The next earliest reference found thus far was on 4chans /sp/ board [3] on September 15th, 2012, in which the user says “My heart started doki doki-ing all over the shop”.

    Notable Examples

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Yahoo! Answers – You Make My Kokoro Go Doki Doki? / Indexed on January 15th, 2012

    [2]Urban Dictionary – My kokoro goes doki doki / Posted on February 8th, 2012

    [3]4chan – One of the earliest references / Posted September 15th, 2012


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  • 01/05/16--18:06: Gen Zed
  • The article is a work in progress, if you can help improve this article then please request editorship.



    About

    Gen Zed is an animated adult comedy series created by Hayden Black, the creator of webseries Goodnight Burback. The series focuses on protagonist Shona Sommers, a 19 year old transwoman living in Downtown Los Angeles with her friends in a loft. Shona aspires to be an “edgy” stand-up comedian, while her other friends/roommates embody various millennial stereotypes, such as Cameron, described as a “shit poet” and nerd; Huey, a tattooed musician prone to acting like a “douchebag;” and Betsy, an Asian-American heiress to millions of dollars who’s addicted to prescription drugs and aspires to be a fashion designer.[1]

    History

    The series was announced On June 6, 2015 with a debut trailer (below), and is currently slated to premiere sometime in 2016.



    Online Presence

    In the months following the debut trailer, people behind the series have opened a Facebook page[2], a Tumblr blog[3], and an in-character Twitter page featuring jokes by the character Shona[3]. Following the release of the trailer, websites such as The Mary Sue praised the series for featuring a transgender character voiced by a transwoman (Julie Rei Goldstein).[4]

    Criticisms

    Not long after the release of Gen Zed’s debut trailer, 4chan and 8chan’s Comics and Cartoons boards, /co/, took notice of the series, and a page for Gen Zed was created on the website Encyclopedia Dramatica[5]. Criticisms of the show include aspects such as the animation and character designs, derided for looking like a “generic” flash animated cartoon done by people new to the medium. Promotional material was also heavily criticized for putting a heavy focus on the show’s transgender character Shona, leading to accusations that the series wouldn’t even be anything special had said character not been present at all.

    The show also came under fire for claiming to be the “first animated series with a transgender voice actor in a starring role.” This claim was disputed by fans of series such as the anime adaptation of Pokemon, which featured the late Maddie Blaustein, a tranwoman, as the voice of the popular character Meowth. Fans of the webseries TOME, created by animator Kirbopher, also disputed this claim when voice actor Casey Mongillo came out as a transwoman. The official Gen Zed Tumblr responded to these accusations by stating that neither voice actor voiced a “main character,” and thus their “first animated series with a transgender voice actor in a starring role” claim is “accurate.”[6] The claim was found to be especially strange for places such as Encyclopedia Dramatica when it was discovered Casey Mangillo herself is a voice actor on Gen Zed.[8]

    Claims of Harassment

    Social media pages for Gen Zed were eventually flooded with troll responses from people from various parts of the internet, such as spamming transphobic and antisemitic remarks at Julie Rei Goldstein, or the Encyclopedia Dramatica Twitter calling for people to flag the show’s debut trailer in an effort to get it taken down (below, middle).

    The Mary Sue later ran an article in August 2015 discussing the attention the series was receiving from the likes of 4chan, 8chan, and Encyclopedia Dramatica[7], criticizing the users of said sites for trolling the social media pages relating to the show and “harassing” the staff. The Mary Sue even interviewed members of the show’s staff about said trolling. When questioned about it, series creator Hayden Black said:

    “I was definitely thrown those first few hours as I’d never seen this type of hatred before and my knee-jerk reaction was to delete virtually every comment. Since then, we’ve seen a lot of this show’s shit trolling which doesn’t bother me at all. But I’m wondering if it’s so lame, why are you telling us this thousands of times a day? What are you so afraid of?”

    Examples



    Search Interest


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  • 01/05/16--19:47: Ran Off Da Plug Twice
  • About

    Ran Off Da Plug Twice is a viral video dance meme in which people imitate a scene from the video for “Ritz Carlton” by the rapper Plies. The dance became popular worldwide after football players adopted it as a touchdown dance.

    Origin

    The rapper Plies released the song “Ritz Carlton” as part of his “Ain’t No Mixtape Bih 2” mixtape in fall of 2015; the video was uploaded as a WorldStarHipHop exclusive on November 19th, 2015.[1] In the song, Plies says the lyric “run off on the plug twice.” A plug is generally defined by Urban Dictionary as someone from whom one would purchase drugs;[2] Plies appears to be bragging about not paying for drugs from the same person twice. Plies then says that he won’t be accepting calls from the plug.[3]



    Spread

    Odell Beckham Jr, a star football player, was recorded listening and singing along to the song while driving in early December in a video which was tweeted by Plies.[4] Users started dancing to the lyric shortly after this video and tagging Plies on social media shortly after; many of these videos were retweeted or regrammed by the rapper, or both.[5] In late December, college football players at Baylor University were captured doing the running man-style dance that Plies performs in the video after getting a touchdown.[6] The next day, players in Houston were recorded doing the dance as well;[7] in subsequent days, during the Orange Bowl, and at other sporting events, sports players were recorded doing the dance as a means of demonstrating triumph. Soon, the dance caught on with Instagram and Vine. There are over 5,200 photos tagged with #ranoffontheplugtwice[8] on Instagram; while there is no settled hashtag available on Vine, searches for the term bring up many results.[9]

    Notable Examples



    Search Interest



    External References

    [1]YouTube – Plies – Ritz Carlton

    [2]Urban Dictionary – Plug

    [3]Genius – Ritz Carlton

    [4]Twitter – Plies’ Tweet

    [5]Twitter – Plies

    [6]Twitter – @ParkerBoudreaux’s Tweet

    [7]Twitter – ayanna_airborne’s tweet

    [8]Instagram – #ranoffdaplugtwice

    [9]Vine – ran off the plug twice


    0 0

    About

    Sii come Bill / Sé Como José / Be Like Bill is an exploitablewebcomic usually depicting a stick figure using a computer, and accompanied by a parable of the figure’s “smart” online behavior. Since emerging through English-language humor websites sometime in late 2015, the single-pane stick figure illustration has been translated into other languages like Spanish (Sé Como José) and Italian (Sii Come Bill).

    Origin

    The origin of the drawing is unknown, but it began showing up on forums like Funnyjunk[1] and Reddit[2] in October of 2015. The earliest instance of the image was in English, and was meant as an ironic jab at social justice warriors.



    Spread

    On December 21st, 2015, an Italian Facebook page was created called Sii come Bill (Be like Bill).[3] The page, devoted to posted Italian version of the Be Like Bill meme, has received more than 226,000 likes in less than three weeks. A Spanish-language page, called Sé como José, was launched on January 2nd, and in less than four days has received more than 405,000 followers. Sé como José has received the most attention in the Spanish-speaking press, who have deemed it one of the first “virales” (memes) of 2016. In an interview with Buzzfeed, the anonymous administrator of the Spanish-speaking page said he decided to translate the Bill meme from Italian after seeing its popularity there.

    Notable Examples



    Top row: Italian examples. Bottom row: Spanish examples, some of which are translations of the Italian examples.

    Search Interest

    Not yet available.

    External References


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