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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 12/01/15--19:45: Munchausen By Internet
  • About

    Munchausen By Internet (MBI) is a psychiatric disorder wherein those affected feign disease, illness, or psychological trauma to draw attention, sympathy, or reassurance from online venues such as chat rooms, message boards, Internet Relay Chats and other social media platforms. Those affected may fabricate or induce mental or physical health problems on themselves (known as Munchausen’s Syndrome) but they may also do it on people they have in their care (known as Munchausen By Proxy).

    Origin

    In June 1998, psychiatrist and Munchausen expert Marc Feldman issued a three’page article in the Western Journal of Medicine[1] dealing with the Munchausen By Proxy disorder while also highlighting behavioral patterns that he referred to as “Virtual Factitious Disorder”, noting that the emerging popularity of the Internet, gaining traction in the mid to late 1990s, may have helped spreading a new form of Munchausen’s Syndrome in online communities. As he wrote (excerpt):

    The manner in which false illness is communicated is apparently relatively unconstrained as well. With the exponential increase in the number of people with internet access, “virtual” support groups have multiplied.
    […]
    It is now emerging, however, that these groups simultaneously provide an inexpensive, convenient and readily accessible forum for people who choose to misrepresent themselves as ill.

    Feldman later coined the term “Munchausen By Internet” in a July 2000 publication for the Southern Medical Journal[2].

    Spread

    On November 28th 2000, Dr Theodore Dalrymple wrote a column titled Desperately seeking sympathy on news site The Guardian[3], commenting on Feldman’s work and the phrase.

    [WIP]

    Notable Examples

    Garnett-Paul Spears’ Death



    Garnett-Paul Spears was a five-year-old boy and the subject of Garnett’s Journey, a personal blog run by his mother Lacey Spears to chronicle his lifelong battle with chronic illnesses, who mysteriously died as a result of a lethal-level intake of sodium during a hospital visit in June 2014. Shortly after Garnett was pronounced brain dead, Lacey Spears was charged with murder on suspicion that she poisoned her son with a fatal dose of sodium, which prompted many to speculate that she had been making her child ill for online attention and sympathy, a psychiatric disorder known as Münchausen syndrome by proxy.

    For more information about this event, please read the related Know Your Meme article.

    Belle Gibson

    [wip]

    Catfish

    Catfish is a slang term used to describe someone who assumes false accounts on social networking sites for the sake of developing online relationships with strangers or pretending to be in a relationship. It is related to Munchausen By Internet in the fact that the affected person may create entire fake online personas with their respective fake illnesses and disabilities in order to attract attention and sympathy.

    For more information, please read the related Know Your Meme article.

    External References

    [1]National Center for Biotechnology Information – ‘Virtual’ factitious disorders and Munchausen by proxy. / West J Med. 1998 Jun; 168(6): 537–539.

    [2]Medscape.com – Munchausen by Internet / 2000 Jul;93(7):669-72.

    [3]The Guardian – Desperately seeking sympathy


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  • 12/02/15--11:27: Blyat
  • About

    “Blyat” is a Russian expletive translated as “bitch” or “whore” in English. Online, the term is often referenced by English speaking Counter-Strike players to mock the speech of Russian opponents in online matches.

    Origin

    The exact origin of the term is unclear. The earliest known definition was submitted on September 6th, 2005 to Urban Dictionary,[1] where user Spiel Brickner identified “bylat” as a Russian slang term for “whore” or “slut” that can also be used as a general-purpose expletive.



    Spread

    On May 8th, 2013, YouTuber PluPekoInside2 uploaded a montage of Russian dash cam videos titled “Blyat on the road compilation” (shown below, left). On May 16th, YouTuber PluPekoInside2 uploaded another dash cam video titled “Blyat, blyat!, blyat (blyad),” in which a motorist utters the word “blyat” several times while rear ending another vehicle (shown below, right).



    On January 21st, 2015, YouTuber FeedaN uploaded a video titled “Cyka Blyat (Suka) Song,” featuring a musical track with a man repeating the phrase “cyka blyat” (shown below).



    On February 16th, an image macro titled “Cyka Blyat” was submitted to 9gag,[2] which featured a screenshot from the game Counter-Strike: Go with the caption “CS:Go / The fastest way to learn Russian” (shown below).



    On November 7th, 2015, RedditorJoshster21 submitted a list of user-submitted translations for the phrase “cyka blyat” on the language site MyMemory.net to the /r/pcmasterrace[3] subreddit, where it gathered upwards of 1,100 votes (91% upvoted) and 150 comments in the first month (shown below).



    On November 23rd, 2015, YouTuber HoungGounGagne uploaded a music video titled “CS: Go – Let’s Go Rush Blyat,” featuring lyrics mocking Russian Counter-Strike players (shown below).



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Urban Dictionary – blyat

    [2]9gag – Cyka Blyat

    [3]Reddit – What does cyka blyat really mean


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  • 12/02/15--14:08: Gollum
  • About

    Gollum is a fictional character in the fantasy novels The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings.

    Origin

    On September 21st, 1937, the fantasy novel and children’s book The Hobbit, or There and Back Again was released. In the book, the character Gollum is introduced as a disfigured creature who inhabits a small island in an underground lake. The character is obsessed with a magical ring he refers to as “my precious,” which is discovered by the character Bilbo Baggins. In The Lord of the Rings, it is revealed that Gollum was previously a Hobbit named Sméagol, who had been twisted by the influence of the ring.

    Depictions in Film

    In 1977, Gollum was depicted as a amphibian-like creature with large, glowing eyes in the animated musical adaptation of The Hobbit (shown below, left). In 1978, the character was animated as a dark-skinned creature with pointed ears in the animated film adaptation of The Lord of the Rings (shown below, right).



    In the The Lords of the Rings film trilogy by Peter Jackson, Gollum is depicted using CGI technology as a small, pale-skinned, Hobbit-like character with thin hair and large eyes (shown below).



    Spread

    Tayyip Erdoğan Gollum Meme



    On December 2nd, 2015, Redditor Karrakan posted an article about the court cast to /r/worldnews. Within 12 hours, the post gathered more than 6,600 votes (97% upvoted) and 1,300 comments. The same day, Redditor SmokeyBare posted the image to /r/pics,[2] where it reached the front page with upwards of 8,900 votes (97% upvoted) and 2,400 comments within the first six hours.



    “Streisand Effect”:

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 12/02/15--22:25: Battle Droid
  • B1 battle droids, sometimes referred to as standard battle droids, were battle droids that made up the backbone of the Trade Federation Droid Army and the Separatist Droid Army. Often called “Clankers” by Galactic Republic clone troopers, they were the successor of the OOM-series battle droid.

    B1s were perhaps the most numerous--and expendable--soldiers in galactic history, and, unlike most organic soldiers, they were capable of action in hostile environments such as underwater or in space. They were designed, for the most part, to defeat their enemies through sheer numbers, not through their ability to think (they were very vulnerable to tricks) and utilize combat skills (unlike clone troopers).

    The B1 battle droid was frequently used as a soldier for the Trade Federation. As a result, B1s were present in nearly every battle involving the Trade Federation.

    Early battles involving the droids required a central computer for the droids to “think” from, but this was mostly removed post-Battle of Naboo after an attack destroyed the mainframe stationed there, resulting in all the droids on the planet being deactivated.


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  • 12/03/15--09:56: Net Art
  • About

    Net Art, also referred to as Internet Art, is a genre of fine art that uses networked interfaces as medium or for distribution. This can include work that is browser-based and created with code, or work that was created with other software or algorithms and is either exhibited or distributed with networked interfaces, often in combination with interactivity. While net art has no defined structure, the capabilities of commercially available computing equipment, network speed, and common software have often helped to define the art genre’s aesthetics.

    History

    Since net art is a new genre, and one that uses new technologies, its history is often shifting. Currently, one of the first known works to use the public computer network we now call the Internet was perhaps Vera Frenkel’s “String Games,” where the artist conducted a national game of human-sized Cat’s Cradle via networked video transmission.



    The term “Net Art” was coined in 1995 by the Slovenian artist Vuk Cosic, who opened a corrupted email file and was only able to make out those two words. He went on to co-found the group net.art, a cohort of artists working in the form. The term then spread to envelop the range of work being developed in the 1990s by a variety of artists who were often working in tandem with new organizations and institutions like Rhizome, Syndicate, and Nettime, all early mailing lists devoted to Internet Art.



    In the early 2000s, Net Art began to appear in brick and mortar galleries and museums worldwide in many different permutations. Upon the advent of social media networks like Tumblr, Flickr, Livejournal, and Instagram, net art began to spread and be spread by users and fans, who formed many alternative communities around specific types, including Vaporwave, Glitch, and Webpunk.



    Net art is often created with visualization-friendly coding systems like Javascript, JQuery, and WebGL, or with image editing and animating software like the Adobe Suite, or 3D software like Mya, Cinema 4D, and Blender. In addition, a large part of the net art aesthetic involves re-appropriating software and hardware tools for artistic use.

    Online Presence

    Net art has no central hub, but rather spreads through online discourse in a variety of ways. Net-Art.org is a publication that discusses the format, but aesthetically, it’s rooted more in algorithm than texture. Rhizome.org and its tool, the Artbase, archive works of net art for the future, often showing them in emulator forms. In addition, Archive.org also works as a repository of work made by artists who host it on a domain.

    Many net artists host their work on their own web sites, but also use social networks to distribute it to a wider audience. Tumblr is an especially highly-used site, with the #net art tag accumulating many posts per minute and some popular blogs, like Fuck Yeah Net Art, distribute individual pieces to a wide audience.

    Notable Examples

    Net art is often not in the form of static or still images, so many of these images below are screenshots of dynamic work, and should not be considered representative of the form as a whole.



    Search Interest



    External References


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  • 12/03/15--14:39: 2015 San Bernardino Shooting
  • Overview

    The 2015 San Bernardino Shooting was a mass shooting that occurred at the Inland Regional Center, a not-for-profit agency providing services to people with developmental disabilities, in San Bernardino, California in early December, 2015.

    Background

    On December 2nd, 2015, the married couple Syed Rizwan Farook and wife Tashfeen Malik left their six-month-old daughter with Farook’s mother before traveling to the Inland Regional Center wearing ski masks, camouflage and armed with two AR-15 rifles and two semi-automatic pistols. The two opened fire on people in attendance of a holiday party for the San Bernardino County Department of Health, killing 14 people and injuring 21 others. The pair fled the scene and were pursued by law enforcement, ending in a shootout on East San Bernardino Boulevard approximately 1.7 miles away. Both suspects were killed and one officer was injured in the conflict.



    Notable Developments

    Shooters Identified

    That evening, police identified the deceased suspects as Syed Rizwan Farook and Tashfeen Malik. Farook was a 28-year-old American citizen and son of Pakistani immigrants and Malik was a 27-year-old woman originally from Pakistan who Farook met during a trip to Saudi Arabia in the spring of 2014. The couple had a six-month-old daughter

    Motive

    The motive for the attack is currently under investigation. On December 2nd, rumors circulated that Farook was in attendance of the holiday party prior to the shooting and angrily left before returning with weapons and tactical gear. The following day, the FBI revealed that Farook had been in touch with people being investigated by the agency for international terrorism. Additionally, 12 pipe bombs and tools that could be used to construct various explosives were discovered in Farook’s home. That day, CNN[2] reported that Farook had been “radicalized” according to law enforcement officials. The FBI is currently treating the attack as a possible terrorism case.[4]

    Online Reactions

    On December 2nd, the KPCCRadio YouTube channel uploaded video footage of survivors being directed by police officers inside the Inland Regional Center following the shooting (shown below). The following day, Redditor CarlosWeiner submitted the footage to the /r/videos[3] subreddit, where it gathered upwards of 3,100 votes (83% upvoted) and 620 comments in less than 24 hours.



    On Twitter, the misspelled hashtag #SanBernadino began trending worldwide. Additionally, the hashtag “#America_Burning” was tweeted by supporters of ISIS.

    On December 3rd, the New York Daily ran the front page headline “God Isn’t Fixing This,” which featured tweets by Republican politicians mentioning “prayers” for victims of the shooting, referring to the statements as “platitudes” (shown below).



    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References


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  • 12/04/15--12:35: China Smog

  • Overview

    Chinese Smog, also referred to as Chinese Air Pollution, refers to the high levels of toxic material in the atmosphere of China, which is a danger to Chinese public health and an environmental crisis. Many online track and discuss the daily pollution levels, while others ridicule China for its issue.

    History

    The quick industrialization of China has led to extremely high levels of air pollution, mostly due to the Chinese system of powering their cities with coal and the large quantity of factories.[1] Several times since 2013, the pollution has reached levels that are higher than the Global Air Quality Index, with higher levels of particulate parts per million than the scale is usually used to record.[2] In 2004, it was recorded that the cities with the highest level of particulate matter in the air were Tianjin, Chongqing, and Shenyang.

    The government of China has responded with stricter regulations, however, only some types of particulate, like sulfur, have declined, and smog continues to reach extremely dangerous levels in many areas of China, often spreading into other bordering countries and worldwide.[3]



    Chinese air pollution, as as seen from space.

    Notable Developments

    Fake Sunrise on a Screen

    In January of 2014, during a smog crisis, a photograph by ChinaFotoPress was circulated via Getty Images that appeared to show residents of Beijing watching the sun rise on a large outdoor LCD screen in Tiananmen Square. Many news outlets, including the Huffington Post,[4] The Daily Mail[5] and The Mirror,[6] reported that the heavy smog had blocked out the sunrise, forcing residents to watch it on the screen instead. The story was later debunked as an untruth; the sunrise was a still from a Chinese tourism commercial, and the people watching it were simply residents and visitors to the historical site.[7]



    Vacuumed Smog Brick

    During the summer of 2015, when smog levels were at record high numbers, an artist going by the name “Brother Nut” created a project which lasted for 100 days. Each day he walked around Beijing, vacuuming the air, and compressing the particulate he collected.[8] After the 100 days, Brother Nut had compressed about 100 grams of particulate from the amount of air that 62 people breathe in one day; he then took the dust to a factory and had it mixed with clay into a foundation-style brick. This story received international media attention and was posted heavily on Facebook and Twitter, where it was a trending topic.



    Outlining Beijing Landmarks

    In December 2015, users of Chinese social media began posting photos of the notable buildings of Beijing covered in smog. Since the buildings were obscured by the pollution, the users outlined their shapes. These images received attention on both the Eastern and Western media, including articles on Mashable[9] and Wu Jie News.[10]



    Search Interest



    External References


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  • 12/04/15--22:40: Moliere
  • HISTORY: These memes are the leftovers of a meme war that was started by the upper class in Neoclassical France when they were offended by the comedies that Moliere produced to “correct them” of their vices to which they were most accustomed.
    In particular, they were offended by plays like Tartuffe, that showed the perceived abuses of power that the upper class and clergy would take, and they even succeeded in banning this play and other iterations of it. Eventually, the king sided with Moliere, and he was well supported until his death after an epic performance of The Imaginary Invalid, which his detractors no doubt were thrilled by. With his death having been so recent, some may say that these memes are “too soon,” but no doubt, he would be amused by them.

    OBITUARY: Moliere, formerly known as Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, is an actor who was born on January 15th, 1622 in Paris, France. No doubt, this birthplace, and the relative wealth of his family should have encouraged him to fall in line with the average upper class of the day, but he lived by a different motto, which was that man should not live to eat, but eat to live.
    Throughout his life, he performed and wrote for many patrons, most notably Monsieur, the Duke of Orleans, and even King Louis the XIV. His plays ranged from dramatic works to comedies, where he truly found his place in using his comedy to “correct men” while “amusing them”.
    Though he lived the wicked profession of an actor, our sources have told us that he was allowed a secret burial by night in the section of the cemetery normally reserved for infernal unbaptized infants.


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  • 12/05/15--04:45: Jerkcity


  • About

    Jerkcity is a webcomic created by Michael Lopp and Tristan A. Farnon with two others only known by their handles (Deuce and Pants) and it has been published almost daily since 1998. Jerkcity is created with Microsoft Comic Chat[2] and has crude and ridiculous content including drinking, drug abuce and sex jokes.

    Premise

    Jerkcity follows the adventures of four characters: Pants, Rands, Deuce, and Spigot and contains no actual character development, plot, storyline, or continuity. The creators described it as “a story told out of order.”



    Left to right: Pants, Deuce, Spigot and Rands

    History

    In mid 1990’s Michael, Tristan and two other were connected to a private chatroom where they amused each other with dick jokes, programming jokes, and other off-color humor. In May 1998, Michael purchased jerkcity.com domain name independent of any actual use for it, until he discovered Microsoft Comic Chat and used three years worth of logs from group’s chat room to create the comic strip itself. The first strip was released on August 17th, 1998.[11]



    Online Presence

    Jerkcity was mentioned in Buzzfeed article 80’s And 90’s Web Comics Were Insanely Geeky. On September 18th, 2008, YouTuber SpamNapkin uploaded a video titled “Funny Jerkcity Joekz”, featuring several strips of the series and gaining over 11,100 views in the following seven years. On February 26th, 2010, YouTuber stretchpants uploaded a video titled “Jerkcity: SPACE JERKIN’”, being the reupload of an animation featuring Spigot masturbating with planets in the background, gaining over 10,000 views in the following five years.



    On May 26th, 2010, a subreddit dedicated to the series was created, gaining over 166 subscribers in the following five years.[5] On April 8th, 2013, the Tumblr blog Jerkcity HD[6] blog was created, containing fanmade remasters of Jerkcity comic strips.[6] Other popular fan blogs have also been created such as Dick Missiles,[7]Jerkcity Hi-Fi[8] and Regular Jerkcity.[9] As December 5th, 2015, searching on the artist community deviantART the keyword “jerkcity” leads to over 100 results,[10] having also presence on other communities like Tumblr.[4]





    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 12/05/15--20:50: 60 Seconds!

  • Note Work in Progress

    About


    60 Seconds! is an indie survival dark comedy game in which the player must survive as long as possible to get a family rescued by waiting in a bunker and scavenging via sending them out

    Origins


    On May 25, 2015. The game was released to the public on steam, in which it got very positive ratings and feedback

    Plot


    The plot of the game is that Bombs go off in Ted’s Home town where the government warns Ted, In which he has barely enough time to get a many supplies and family members as possible

    Spread


    On May 30, 2015. A youtuber by the name of WeaselZone made a video called 60 Seconds – Ep. 1 – NUCLEARAPOCALYPSE★ Let’s Play 60 Seconds! in which he gets almost all of the family members except Mary Jane and only survives for 20 days

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  • 12/07/15--11:42: Beast
  • About

    Beast is a white Puli dog belonging to Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan. The dog, known for his signature long, curly coat, has gained a substantial following online since the launch of his Facebook page in 2011.

    Origin

    On January 10th, 2011, Beast was born in the care of a Puli Hungarian sheep dog breeder in Grants Pass, Oregon and was subsequently purchased by Zuckerberg and Chan. On March 6th, a Facebook[1] page for Beast was launched, which gained over 2.2 million likes in the following five years.



    Spread

    On April 10th, 2012, Zuckerberg posted a photograph of Beast to his official Instagram[6] page, where it gathered upwards of 3,500 likes and 275 comments over the next four years (shown below).



    On May 21st, 2013, the Taiwanese Animators YouTube channel posted a animated video about the dog (shown below).



    On May 30th, 2014, Chan appeared in her first television interview on the talk show Today, where she revealed that Beast herds sheep as an “extracurricular activity” and that the dog is Zuckerberg’s “second priority after Facebook” (shown below).



    On November 28th, 2015, Zuckerberg posted a photograph of Beast mid-jump to Facebook,[5] which garnered more than 693,000 likes, 28,500 shares and 24,000 comments in the next two weeks (shown below, left). On December 4th, the photo was submitted to Fark,[3] where several users posted photoshopped versions of the image (shown below, middle, right).



    On December 2nd, CNN Money[2] published a slideshow of photographs featuring Beast. On December 4th, The Daily Dot[4] published an article titled “The Internet Can’t Get Over Mark Zuckerberg’s Weird Dog.”

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 12/08/15--08:55: You Ain't No Muslim, Bruv
  • About

    You Ain’t No Muslim, Bruv, often referred to by its hashtag #YouAintNoMuslimBruv, is a phrase originally spoken during a religiously-motivated attack in the London Underground mass transit system that spread quickly due to its representation of the feelings of main mainstream Muslims towards extremists in their religion.

    Origin

    On December 4th, in the Leytonstone Station of the London Underground, a video was recorded of a crazed man attempting to stab bystanders while yelling Allahu Akbar. As the man is detained by police, a bystander yells “You ain’t no Muslim, Bruv,” a reference to the man’s violent actions (violence is condemned in most Koranic interpretations) combined with the British slang for brother, similarly used to the American slang bro. The bystander repeats the phrase twice more in the video.



    Spread

    After the British tabloid The Daily Mail published the story and the video,[1] many began tweeting the phrase as a rallying cry for their complaints against Muslim extremists. On December 5th, the day after the attack, the hashtag was used more than 56,000 times,[2] and by three days after the attack, the use had reached almost 120,000.[3] In addition to being a trending topic on Facebook, the hashtag’s popularity was catalogued by the BBC,[4] the Australian ABC,[5] and the Independent.[6]David Cameron, the Prime Minister of the UK, repeated the phrase during a speech, and the video of his response was distributed widely by many accounts.[7]



    In addition, a grime-style remix of the phrase by artist Nasty McQuaid received over 32,000 plays on Soundcloud.

    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    Not yet available.

    External References


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  • 12/08/15--10:44: 5/7
  • About

    5/7 refers to a rating for the 1999 drama film Fight Club shown in a Facebook status update attributed to user Brendan Sullivan. After the screenshot widely circulated on Imgur in December 2015, users began posting “5/7” ratings in comments sections as an inside joke on the image-sharing site.

    Origin

    On December 6th, 2015, Imgur[1] user FreshPrinceofDenmark posted a series of Facebook screenshots in which a user named Robert Graves mocks various people in status update posts. One screenshot contained a post by user Brendan Sullivan, who gave the film Fight Club a rating of “5/7” (shown below).



    The gallery contained an additional screenshot in which Graves mocks the 5/7 rating by suggesting that Sullivan actually means “a week” when saying “five days” (shown below). In the first 48 hours, the post gained over 463,000 views, 24,900 points and 1,100 comments.



    Spread

    The same day, the screenshots were reposted on FunnyJunk[2] where they received more than 15,700 views and 380 points within 48 hours. Meanwhile, Redditor wakuboys submitted a post titled “What is with the 5/7 jokes?” to the /r/OutOfTheLoop[4] subreddit. On December 7th, 2015, Imgur[6] user user8550 posted photographs of a man rescuing a sea turtle with the title “I Give This Man a 5/7.” On December 8th, Imgur[5] user sadman13 posted a screenshot of the Fight ClubIMDB page edited with a rating of “5/7” (shown below).



    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References


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    Overview

    Paige Yore’s Walmart Cashier Story refers to a video of a woman telling a story about a customer freakout episode that allegedly took place at the checkout line at a Walmart superstore in Pueblo, Colorado. After the video was uploaded to Facebook and YouTube in early December 2015, it quickly entered widespread circulation in the news as a feel-good story of the holiday season, though the validity of the woman’s story still remains in dispute as Walmart has denied that the event has ever taken place.

    Background

    On December 4th, 2015, a 25-years-old woman named Paige Yore uploaded a Facebook video[1] in which she tells a story about a heartwarming exchange she has had with a teenage cashier at a Walmart store in Pueblo, Colorado. In the video, Yore explains that she was waiting at the checkout line for nearly 20 minutes when a disgruntled customer in front of her began berating the cashier for being slow. Upon witnessing the exchange, Yore allegedly intervened to mediate the situation, at which point the young store clerk broke down in tears and revealed to her that his mom had committed suicide just hours before his shift began.



    Notable Developments

    Within the first 72 hours of upload, the video garnered more than 25 million views, 35,400 likes and 894,000 shares, as well as hundreds of comments from viewers on Facebook who said they were touched by the story. On December 6th, Redditor Nohmdd submitted the Facebook video to /r/videos[2] with the title “Don’t forget that there’s a person behind the register,” where it garnered more than 4,110 points and 2,490 comments. By December 7th, several local news outlets had begun highlighting the Facebook video as a heartwarming story of faith in humanity gone viral, including WITI[3], KFOR[4], WHNT[6] and WTVR[5], as well as viral media blogs like Uproxx[14], Newser[7], Inquistr[14], Snopes[12] and Daily Mail[9].

    Walmart’s Response

    Also on December 7th, Walmart spokesperson Aaron Mullins responded to the news media coverage of the Facebook video disputing that the story, as Yore described in the video, had never actually taken place at the checkout line, citing the company’s review of the surveillance video footage. According to Mullins, the video suggests there may have been some tension between the cashier and the customer in front of Yore, possibly due to a language barrier, but at no point during this exchange does the surveillance footage show the customer yelling at the cashier or Yore embracing the teenager. In addition, Mullins revealed that the company has spoken with the cashier in question and confirmed that his mother is in good health and alive.

    Search Interest

    [not yet available]

    External References


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  • 12/08/15--14:18: Beetlejuicing
  • About

    Beetlejuicing is a commenting phenomenon observed on the social news site Reddit when a user replies to a post or comment whose username is contextually relevant to the topic of discussion at hand, especially when it occurs by coincidence and the commenter is unaware of the connection being made.

    Origin

    On April 4th, 2010, Urban Dictionary[1] user tankedgirl submitted an entry for “beetlejuiced,” defining it as a phenomenon that occurs when a person appears after they have been mentioned several times in conversation. The earliest known use of the term “beetlejuicing” in the context of a discussion thread conversation was posted in the /r/AskReddit[4] subreddit on January 13th, 2013. In the thread, Redditor bigfrank84 replied to a comment containing the name “Big Frank,” to which Redditor tynosaur responded “One of the best instances of Beetlejuicing I’ve ever seen” (shown below).



    Etymology

    The term is derived from the 1988 American horror comedy film Beetlejuice in a scene where the titular ghost explains to the protagonist character Lydia Deetz that she can summon him anytime by repeating his name three times (shown below).



    Betelgeuse: I can’t help you from this side, but here’s how we do it. So simple. Say my name three times. That’s all. I’ll be all yours. Then I’ll bring you over here in style.

    Spread

    The same day, the subreddit /r/beetlejuicing[2] was launched for examples of comments threads in which a user replied to their handle being used. On June 28th, 2013, Redditor CaterpillarPromise submitted a screenshot of a beetlejuicing example to /r/TreesSuckingAtThings[5] (shown below).



    On September 3rd, 2015, Redditor ShankingTonberry recommended /r/beetlejuicing in a post on the /r/JustUnsubbed[6] subreddit. On December 8th, Redditor BruceXavier submitted a post titled “Why is /r/beetlejuicing called that?” to the /r/OutOfTheLoop[3] subreddit, to which Redditor cathalmc cited the 1988 film Beetlejuice as the origin of the name.

    Various Examples


    <img src=“’ height=”135"> <img src=“’ height=”135"> <img src=“’ height=”135"> <img src=“’ height=”135"> <img src=“’ height=”135"> <img src=“’ height=”135">

    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References


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    WIP



    >

    About

    “Succ” is a slang word used as a form for bragging to receive fellatio, and is commonly phrased as “She succ me” and “Get the succ”. The phrase is usually tagged with a captioned image or a screenshot.

    Origin

    Although its true origin is unknown the earliest instance of the phrase was in a 2014 by the Tumblr user “Shagia”[1] with a post of the Wojak/Feels Guy with the caption “she succ me thru my feel ….” (shown below left), but the most popular instance was in March 30, 2015 by Tumblr user “heart” with a post saying “she succ me thru my boxers”[2] gaining over 110000 notes (shown below right).



    Notable Examples

    External References

    [1]Tumblr – she succ me thru my feel….

    [2]Tumblr – she succ me thru my boxers


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    About

    What Is the Airspeed Velocity of an Unladen Swallow? is a quote from the 1975 film Monty Python and the Holy Grail. The question is often referred to online as a way of calling a topic or question overly trivial or technical.

    Origin

    In the 1975 film Monty Python and the Holy Grail, the discussion of the airspeed velocity of an unladen swallow takes place twice in the film.[1] In the first scene, King Arthur asks a castle guard if he may be let in, since he has been riding all day to get there. The guard points out that he has not been riding, as his horse consists purely of the sound of two coconuts being clicked together, and a discussion of where the coconuts could have been obtained follows. During this discussion, King Arthur suggests that they could have been brought to England via a migrating swallow, and the castle guards continue to discuss the probability of this suggestion at length, becoming more and more technical in their debate. King Arthur becomes annoyed and rides away. Later in the film, Arthur is trying to bypass a troll who asks him “What is the airspeed velocity of an unladen swallow?” Arthur, informed by the earlier debate, asks “What do you mean? African or European swallow?” Since the troll cannot answer this question, he is defeated.



    Spread

    The quote has long been an inside joke for fans of Monty Python and also those interested in computing. It’s possible to find discussions on Usenet dating back to at least 1991 where the quote, along with Arthur’s response, are quoted both in Monty Python-specific contexts and elsewhere.[2]

    In 2003, a writer named Jonathan Corum created a site devoted to answering the question scientifically, with the use of “alternate graphic presentations for kinematic ratios in winged flight.”[3] He found the following conclusion:

    Although a definitive answer would of course require further measurements, published species-wide averages of wing length and body mass, initial Strouhal estimates based on those averages and cross-species comparisons, the Lund wind tunnel study of birds flying at a range of speeds, and revised Strouhal numbers based on that study all lead me to estimate that the average cruising airspeed velocity of an unladen European Swallow is roughly 11 meters per second, or 24 miles an hour.

    Several systems have the question, or answers to the question, as in-jokes. Upon being asked, Siri has responded “Assuming a spherical swallow in a vacuum… ah… forget it,”[4] but also responds in other ways in more modern versions of iOS.



    Wolfram Alpha uses Corum’s answer, rounded up to roughly 25 miles per hour.[5] The More Awesome Than You message board uses the question as a registration question.[6] The question has been asked more than 883 times on Yahoo Answers, and the top-voted reply is usually either the dialogue from the original film, or the answer generated by Corum.[7]

    Search Interest

    Not available at this time. Please reference Monty Python and the Holy Grail search topic instead.



    External References


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  • 12/09/15--11:12: Rice Ball Babies

  • About

    Rice Ball Babies (赤ちゃんおにぎり in Japanese) is a photo fad that involves squishing a young child’s face into a triangular shape to resemble the outline of the traditional Japanese food rice balls.

    Origin

    On June 17th, 2015, Japanese comedian Masahiro Ehara tweeted several photographs in which he is shown squishing his children’s faces into a triangle (shown below).[1] Within six months, the tweets gained over 70,000 retweets combined.





    Spread

    In the coming months, other Twitter users posted similar photographs in which children’s faces are squeezed into a triangle shape (shown below).



    On July 8th, the Japanese variety show Disco Star (ディスコ☆スター) aired a segment on the photo fad (shown below, left).[2] On July 9th, Ehara posted a photo in which he is shown attempting to squeeze his adult friend’s face into a triangle shape (shown below, right). On December 9th, 2015, the news sites Mashable,[5]BuzzFeed[3] and Metro[4] published articles about the photo fad.



    Various Examples



    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References


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    About

    George Glass / Sure, Jan / Sküle are phrases used in image macros featuring Jan or Marcia Brady, mostly used on Tumblr in a similar manner to Bye, Felicia.

    Origin

    In A Very Brady Movie, the character Jan lies about having a boyfriend named George Glass, to which her sister Marcia replies “I’ve never heard of a George Glass at our school” (shown below). The scene is an homage to The Brady Bunch episode “The Not-So-Ugly Duckling,” originally aired on November 20th, 1970.



    Jan: “No I mean Glass, George Glass.”
    Marcia: "That’s funny. I’ve never heard of a George Glass at our school.
    Jan: “That’s because he’s a transfer student. He came in the last week of school. He’s really good looking and he thinks I’m super cool.”
    Marcia: “Sure, Jan.”

    Spread

    On January 15th, 2015, Tumblr[1] users began mocking Marcia’s pronunciation of “school” with image macros of the character captioned with the phonetic spelling “sküle” (shown below, left). Additionally, other screencaptures from A Very Brady Movie began circulating on the microblogging site due to the film being streamed on Netflix (shown below, right).[2]



    The same day, Tumblr user benstben[3] uploaded the music video for the 2014 electropop song “Break the Rules” by Charli XCX with Marcia’s “school” clip edited into the chorus (shown below).



    Meanwhile, Tumblr user homoluluhawaii posted an It’s More Likely Than You Think image macro with Marcia along with the caption “George Glass? In our skule?” (shown below). In the first 24 hours, the post gained over 45,200 notes.



    In addition, on January 15th, the Meme Documentation recorded the George Glass meme, as well as a crossover between George Glass and the Civil War 4 meme.[4][5]

    The meme received attention in the mainstream media, with articles on New York Magazine’s Vulture blog,[6] the Daily Dot,[7] and E! Entertainment.[8]

    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 12/09/15--14:48: SMH
  • About

    *SMH" is an initialism for “shaking my head,” which is typically used in text messaging and online discussions to convey feelings of disappointment or dismay in a similar vein to the facepalm.

    Origin

    On February 14th, 2004, Urban Dictionary[1] user trickologist submitted an entry for “smh,” defining it as an acronym for “shake my head” which is used in response to “something so stupid, no words can do it justice” (shown below). Over the next 11 years, the definition gained over 20,100 up votes and 10,400 down votes.



    Spread

    On June 22nd, 2007, Urban Dictionary[6] user Metaview submitted the abbreviation smdh to the site, defining it as “shaking my damn head.” Within eight years, the definition gathered upwards of 1,000 up votes and 300 down votes. On October 24th, 2010, YouTuber crazeepromo uploaded the hiphop track “SMH” by rapper Jimmy Dade (shown below).



    On January 23rd, 2012, “smh” was added to the Online Slang Dictionary.[5] On August 29th, 2013, Vice[3] published an article titled “What Does ‘Shaking My Head’ Even Mean Anymore?”, which noted that the initialism is often used for the alternate phrase “so much hate.” On February 26th, 2015, the pop culture blog Bustle[4] published a compilation of animated reaction GIFs for the initialism (shown below).



    On April 22nd, the site SMHMeansWhat[2] was launched, which contains various posts about the initialism. On September 25th, Redditor ButteredPenguin submitted an image macro about marijuana paraphrenelia titled “Crazy Ass White People SMH” to /r/BlackPeopleTwitter,[7] where it gathered upwards of 2,900 votes (93% upvoted) and 40 comments in two months.



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Urban Dictionary – smh

    [2]SMHMeansWhat.com – SMH Means What?

    [3]Vice – What does Shaking My Head Even Mean Anymore?

    [4]Bustle – What does smh mean

    [5]Online Slang Dictionary – smh

    [6]Urban Dictionary – SMDH

    [7]Reddit – Crazy Ass White People SMH


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