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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 01/22/15--17:09: Well Meme'd
  • About

    “Well Meme’d” is an expression originating on 4chan’s sports board. The phrase came into use in January of 2015, and quickly spread, spawning several image macros.

    Origin

    The phrase originated on /sp/, and quickly spread to other boards such as as /tv, and /v/.

    Search interest

    References

    [1]Moe Archive – Template
    fn2. Moe Archive – Well Meme’d


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  • 01/23/15--03:33: Script kiddie
  • A script kiddie(also known as skid, skiddie, script bunny etc) is a unskilled person who uses scripts or programs to attack networks, systems and such. this term widely used among hackers to describe a newbie who is new to hacking and uses tools, or to describe kids who DDoS video game players or deface websites with ready made tools and scripts.

    according to a Carnegie Mellon report prepared for the U.S. Department of Defense in 2005, script kiddies are defined as:

    “The more immature but unfortunately often just as dangerous exploiter of security lapses on the Internet. The typical script kiddy uses existing and frequently well known and easy-to-find techniques and programs or scripts to search for and exploit weaknesses in other computers on the Internet--often randomly and with little regard or perhaps even understanding of the potentially harmful consequences”

    Script kiddies use many programs, scripts and tools which are easy to find such as RATs, havij, SQLmap, metasploit framwork etc
    to attack systems. A ‘skid’ is sometimes used to describe a person who writes poor/messy code or uses code that other people wrote.


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  • 01/23/15--09:09: Assassin's Creed Logo


  • About

    The Assassin’s Logo as seen above comes from game company Ubisoft’s long-running series Assassin’s Creed. It has become a subject of multiple deviations and reiterations, often given themes and motifs befitting a country or region. Occasionally the logo is themed with another fandom or series.

    Origin

    The logo comes from Ubisoft’s game Assassin’s Creed (2007)[1], which is both the logo of the game itself as well as the logo of the Assassin’s, the secret organization that seeks freedom and peace by murdering Templars, individuals that wish to control and oppress the population.

    Spread

    The logo spread just when the game series itself spread, especially when the series has made it clear that Assassin’s exist all over the world, in various different eras. The tag #assassin’s-creed-logo on tumblr displays multiple variations[2].

    Notable Examples


    Search Interests

    References

    [1]Wikipedia – Assassin’s Creed (video game)

    [2]tumblr – #assassin’s-creed-logo


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  • 01/23/15--11:10: Glitter Bombing
  • About

    Glitter Bombing is a prank that involves dumping glitter particles on an unsuspecting victim. In the United States, the prank has been used as a form of protest against politicians who are opposed to same-sex marriage.

    Origin

    The earliest known glitter bombing occurred on May 17th, 2011, when political activist Nick Espinosa[1] dumped glitter on former Speaker of the United States House of Representatives Newt Gingrinch and his wife Callisata in protest of their opposition to same-sex marriage. That day, the Associated Press YouTube channel uploaded footage of the incident, receiving over 550,000 views and 4,100 comments in the next four years (shown below).



    Spread

    On January 5th, 2012, YouTuber SheyaSite uploaded footage of political activist Vermin Supreme at the “Lesser-Known Democratic Candidates Presidential Forum,” where he glitter bombed Republican pro-life activist Randall Terry, claiming Jesus told him to “make Randall Terry gay” (shown below, left). Over the next three years, the video accumulated more than 2.7 million views and 11,300 comments. On January 21st, Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum was glitter bombed at his primary headquarters in Charleston, South Carolina. Over the next two months, Santorum was glitter bombed an additional three times.



    On February 1st, Republican president candidate Mitt Romney was glitter bombed during a rally in Eagan, Minnesota. On February 7th, he was glitter bombed a second time following a speech during the Colorado Primary (shown below, left). The activist was subsequently arrested and pleaded guilty to charges of “disturbing the peace” in April that year. On March 18th, 2013, YouTuber Edward Lawrence uploaded footage of actress Lindsay Lohan being gitter bombed while arriving at a courthouse in Los Angeles, California (shown below, right).



    Glitter Shipping Services

    In January 2015, the website ShipYourEnemiesGlitter[2] was launched, which mails glitter bombs to a specified address for a fee of $9.99. On January 15th, YouTuber edamame uploaded footage of her father opening a spring-loaded glitter bomb tube sent from the website RuinDays.[3] The following day, Redditor chillwithbill submitted the video to the /r/videos[5] subreddit. Within one week, the video gained over 2.7 million views and the Reddit post gathered upwards of 5,000 votes (89% upvoted). On January 22nd, The Guardian[4] reported that the ShipYourEnemiesGlitter site had sold for $85,000 on the Flippa online marketplace.



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/24/15--01:55: Steam Joke Reviews
  • W.I.P

    About

    Steam Funny Reviews are a series of game reviews done on the videogame software DRM[9] retailer Steam, developed by Valve using their “Helpful customer reviews” function, a feature that has become popular for its tongue-in-cheek use, usually either for mocking the game or for praising/referencing a community fad.

    Origin

    The Steam Review function was added[1] in 2013.

    Spread

    After the release of this feature, multiple tongue-in-cheek reviews started appearing in multiple games, shown more in AAA popular releases as well as controversial games.

    With the increase in popularity of the reviews, multiple videogame review sites started making articles centered around explaining videogames based on humoristic steam reviews, one being on Kotaku[2] which explained Skyrim based on reviews, followed by Complex[3] and PC Gamer[4].

    On 14 January 2014, a link to a compilation of humoristic Dota 2 reviews was posted to the Dota 2 subreddit r/Dota2[5], it has gathered 1001 upvotes and 169 comments, in late December 2013 a tumblr blog titled Steam-Reviews[6] was made, as well as another one titled quality steam reviews[7] in late June 2014, both compiling a series of funny steam reviews taking from a variety of games.

    On 25 January 2014, a discussion on the Steam subreddit r/Steam[10] was posted discussing whether or not Steam Joke Reviews were funny or were hindering the ability to get actual information on the game from real reviews.

    On January 14, 2015, Valve added a “funny” button alongside the upvote and downvote button on Steam reviews to acknowledge the use of the reviews for satire.[8]

    Examples




    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Steam – Steam Reviews

    [2]Kotaku – Skyrim, As Told By Steam Reviews

    [3]Complex – Please Shut Up: The Best and Worst User Reviews on Steam

    [4]PC Gamer – The most baffling Steam reviews

    [5]r/DotA2 – Some of the game reviews on steam sure made me laugh. And cry. And wonder.

    [6]Tumblr – Steam Reviews blog

    [7]Tumblr – Quality Steam Reviews blog

    [8]r/Steam – "Valve has added/are adding a “funny review” button. ":http://www.reddit.com/r/Steam/comments/2sdrhq/valve_has_addedare_adding_a_funny_review_button/

    [9]Wikipedia – Digital Rights Management

    [10]r/Steam – Reviews that try to be funny


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  • 01/24/15--17:05: Dirty Confession Simulators
  • About

    Dirty Confession Simulators are youtube videos that feature anonymous confessions primarily from tumblr fandom confession blogs or comment sections of fandom websites set to the format of thread simulators, where images of the confessions are shown, read with a text-to-speech program and set to he Overworld theme from the 1988 Nintendo game Super Mario Bros 2 soundtrack.

    Precursors

    Confession Blogs/Anonymous Confessions

    Confession Blogs are a type of single topic blog where people can submit confessions. While some sites require registration, most of these sites operate anonymously. On Tumblr, confession blogs are often populated by anonymous submissions and relegated to a certain topic or fandom.

    Origin

    The meme, resulting from youtube users combing images from anonymous confession blogs and the Thread Simulator meme, began sometime during 2012, not long after the first non-4chan thread simulators surfaced. One of the first instances of the meme was a video uploaded by youtube user malkouho entitled Dirty Disney Confessions Thread Simulator v 1.0. It would gain nearly 24,000 views and 198 likes over the subsequent two years.

    Notable Examples

    Search Interest


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  • 01/24/15--21:25: Louis Cuck
  • About

    Louis Cuck is a parody of American comedian Louis CK. It draws on and exaggerates CK’s stand up material to portray him as a “cuck” and a crusader against white people. Louis Cuck frequently calls for white women to be sent to the “Interracial Breeding Grounds” where they will be impregnated by “BBC” (Big Black Cocks).

    The meme originated on 4chan’s /tv/ board and threads usually consist of greentext versions of a Louis Cuck stand up routine.


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  • 01/25/15--06:37: I've always be a fan
  • A man fakes to Love something


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  • 01/25/15--11:39: I Understood That Reference
  • About

    “I Understood That Reference” is an expression typically used in online forums and comments as an affirmative acknowledgement of a specific reference or jargon said by another. The quote was originally said by Captain America in the 2012 Marvel superhero action film The Avengers.

    Origin

    In the film The Avengers, the quote appears in a scene wherein S.H.I.E.L.D operative Nick Fury (portrayed by Samuel L. Jackson) rhetorically asks his team how the villain Loki was able to mind control two of his agents as if they were the winged monkeys from the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz. While most other superheroes are unable to process the dated pop culture reference, Captain America (portrayed by Chris Evans), whose canonical setting overlaps with the time period when the film was originally releases, smugly responds by saying that he “understood that reference”.



    Nick Fury: “I’d like to know how Loki was able to use [the Tesseract] to turn two of the sharpest men I know into his personal flying monkeys.”

    Captain America: “I understood that reference.”

    The earliest known fan art tribute to the quote was submitted by Redditor GeneralBacon in a /r/funny post[11] titled “that awesome moment when” on May 22nd, 2014. The post received more than 1,000 points in aggregate prior to its archival.



    Spread

    On May 23rd, Redditor GeneralBacon’s post was highlighted on We Know Memes.[5] In the months following the home media release of The Avngers in September 2012, Captain America’s response continued to gained online traction among the fans as a memorable scene exemplifying the comedic element of the film. On December 18th, 2012, Imgur user Jpdahn posted the first animated GIF instance[1] of the quote, garnering over 10 million views in just over two years.



    Throughout 2013, the GIF became widely adopted as a reaction image when acknowledging a specific pop culture or internet meme reference by commenters in various online communities, including Reddit, Imgur, Tumblr and Pinterest.

    Notable Examples




    Search Interest



    External References


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  • 01/26/15--07:41: Describe Using Titles
  • About

    Describe Using Titles (also known as Describe Using Quotes) is an online forum game in which participants are asked to desribe certain topics using quotes or titles from a limited amount of sources. The most notable examples of these come from video game or book titles, Pokémon attacks, Spongebob Squarepants quotes, or the player’s sex life.

    Origin

    [Researching]

    Spread

    [Researching]

    Search Interest


    External References


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    WIP

    About

    Taste the Rainbow Motherfucker is a catchphrase, normally used on images with rainbows on it.

    Origin

    The phrase comes from the Nostalgia Critic epsiode about The Care Bears movie, on May 11th, 2010.[1] On the minute 12:36 of the video, the bears defeat a giant eagle using rainbows, when “TASTETHERAINBOWMOTHERFUCKER” is heard. The next day, user Deutsodo uploaded a the scene. As January 26th, 2015 the video has over 430000 views.[2]

    Spread

    Notable examples

    External links


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  • 01/26/15--09:11: Yuri Goggles
  • About

    Yuri Goggles is a phrase usually referring to seeing or emphasizing lesbian relationships, generally within anime or manga, particularly if that was not the original intent of the work.

    Origin

    The phrase “Yuri Goggles” is claimed to be originated by Okazu founder Erica Friedman.[1] The definition of “Yuri Goggless” on the site’s website is: “A phrase coined by Erica for the process through which fans make Yuri where there is little or none in the actual series. Similar to “beer goggles,” Yuri goggles make a series or a couple seem more Yuri the higher you turn them up.” The usage of the phrase on the site dates back to at lest 2004, with the review of Madlax [2]

    Spread

    Various Examples

    Search Interest


    External References


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  • 01/26/15--09:18: ISIS-chan
  • “You have 72 hours to prepare two hundred million delicious Japanese melons. (yummy, yummy)”

    About

    ISIS-chan (Japanese: ISISちゃん, Aishisu Chan) is a moeanthropomorphized character for the jihadist rebel group Islamic State (IS) created by users of the Japanese text board site 2channel. Similar to the story behind the birth of Hinomoto Oniko in 2010, ISIS-chan was conceived as part of an online effort to counter terrorist propaganda by disrupting the search-engine optimization (SEO) profile of relevant keywords with images of a moe character.

    Origin

    On January 24th, 2015, a user on 2channel’s /news4vip/ board[1] submitted a thread titled “Let’s make ISIS into a moe girl and send it to them!” with the intention of Googlebombing the search engine’s image search results for “ISIS” with anime character illustrations." Soon, the physical features and personality of the proposal character were determined through “anchor designation,” a popular forum game in which the specifications of a proposed idea are randomly selected through a lottery of specific post numbers as pre-designated by the original poster.


    <Profile of ISIS_chan>
    Name: ISIS_chan
    Clothes: Black (like ISIS’s uniforms)
    Hairdo: Short hair
    Hair color: black
    Age: 19yo
    Skin color: Brown
    Bust size: Big
    Height: small (about 150cm)
    Eye color: Green-ish
    Favorite foods: Muskmelon (from Japan)

    Spread

    That same day, dozens of anonymous illustrators immediately reacted to the thread and began posting ISIS-chan illustrations. Meanwhile, unlike the Crappy Collage Grand Prix on Twitter, 2channel users formulated the guidelines for ISIS-chan creations to give sufficient considerations to Muslims, Islam, the hostages and their families from the very beginning. And they’re trying to carefully operate the mission, fill Google’s suggestions/image search results for IS by ISIS-chan and beggar the terrorism on the web, via their own Twitter account[2], blog[3], wiki page[4], Tumblr blog[5] and the hashtag“#ISIS Illustration Festival” (#ISISイラスト化祭り), “#ISISちゃん” and “#ISIS_chan” on Twitter.[6]

    You make some agreements with ISIS-chan【Our rule】

    Our target is only ISIS, not Muslim or Islam.

    DO NOT insult Islam.
    DO NOT use Quran, Allah, Muhammad and other Islamic religious symbols in illustrations.
    DO give enough respect to Mr. Goto.

    About Illustrations:

    Reproduction allowed.
    All rights reserved by the artists.
    Artists have the right to prohibit reproductions.

    via: 2channel[11]

    This 2channel users mission had came on 4chan’s /int/[7] and /pol/[8], reddit[9] and Krautchan[10] in the following day.

    Notable Examples




    Search Interest

    [Not Available]

    External References


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  • 01/26/15--12:12: Exploding Kittens
  • Overview

    Exploding Kittens is an upcoming card game featuring illustrations by Oatmeal founder Matt Inman that was successfully crowdfunded through a record-breaking Kickstarter campaign in January 2015.

    Background

    On January 20th, 2015, Inman submitted a Kickstarter[1] campaign for Exploding Kittens, a multi-player, shedding-type card game designed in collaboration with Elan Lee and Shane Small (shown below). In the game, a group of up to eight players take turns pulling cards until an “exploding kitten” card is drawn, at which point the player is eliminated from the game, unless a special “defuse” card is used. The same day, the website ExplodingKittens[2] was created with an infographic run-down of gameplay and rules.



    Notable Developments

    Online Reception

    In the first 20 minutes, the Kickstarter reached its goal of $10,000. Within seven hours of launch, the campaign had received over $1 million in funds. By the end of the next day, $2 million had been raised. 48 hours from its creation, Inman released a comic revealing that the game was the 22nd most-funded Kickstarter campaign in history, the 11th most-funded game and the most-funded card game ever (shown below).



    By January 23rd, the Kickstarter campaign had received more than $3 million in funding. On January 26th, the creators of the campaign announced that they had received upwards of 100,000 backers and that a stand-alone NSFW card deck would be released for the game. Within the first week, the proposal accumulated nearly $4 million, setting a new record for the biggest tabletop game project on Kickstarter.

    News Media Coverage

    During the first week of launch, the game’s online success was covered by a variety of news sites, including The Register,[3] Business Insider,[4] Forbes,[5]CNN[6] and Mashable.[7]

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/26/15--16:30: Post-Game Interviews
  • About

    Post-Game Interviews are footage of sports players being interviewed by reporters immediately following a competition. Online, many interviews containing shocking, humrous or confusing statements have circulated on various video-sharing sites.

    Origin

    The earliest known post-game interview to widely circulate on the Internet featured a rant delivered by basketball player Allen Iverson who repeated the phrase “We talking about practice” during a press conference in May 2002 (shown below).



    Spread

    On May 7th, 2010, YouTuber Shiv Maverick uploaded a clip of basketball player Dwight Howard becoming uncomfortable after being told he is wearing a “good color” (shown below, left). On January 27th, 2011, the ESPN YouTube channel uploaded a post-game interview in which New York Jets football player Bart Scott stretches his arms out as if he is flying over to interviewer Sal Polatonio (shown below, right).



    On May 7th, 2012, Oklahoma City Thunder basketball player Russell Westbrook told a reporter “no more questions for you bro” during a post-game press conference (shown below, left). On February 21st, 2013, Westbrook was interviewed after a game with the Utah Jazz in which he refused to answer a question about the game (shown below, right).



    On September 21st, 2014,
    YouTuber Lauren Mickler uploaded an impassioned post-game interview with high school wide receiver Apollos Hester from Austin, Texas (shown below, left). Within five months, the video gained over 8.6 million views. On November 23rd, Seattle Seahawks football player Marshawn Lynch replied “Yea” to a series a questions during a post-game interview (shown below, right).



    On January 16th, 2015, Westbrook repeated that he had a “good execution” for several questions during a post-game interview (shown below). In the first month, a YouTube upload of the video garnered upwards of 2.6 million views and 2,400 comments.



    Notable Examples

    Ronaldo

    Ronaldo! is a Brazilian internet meme that spawned out of an interview segment from the Brazillian comedy show Pânico na TV (Panic on TV). Among those interviewed on the show that day was Zina, a young, enthusiastic fan of the FC Corinthians who appeared nervous before the camera.



    Why You Heff to be Mad?

    “Why You Heff to be Mad?:http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/why-you-heff-to-be-mad is a memorable quote uttered by Russian professional ice hockey goaltender Ilya Bryzagalov in response to a journalist’s question about his fellow Anaheim Ducks teammate Chris Pronger during a post-game interview in 2006.



    I Was Almost Coming

    “I was Almost Coming” (Japanese: ほぼイキかけました, Hobo ikikake mashita) a catchphrase coined by the Japanese baseball player Ichiro Suzuki. It became to a buzzword shortly after it was uttered in the 2009 World Baseball Classic.



    Yao Ming Face

    Yao Ming Face (sometimes referred to as “Fuck That Guy” or “Dumb Bitch”) is a rage comic-style contour drawing of the professional basketball player Yao Ming wearing a hearty smile. The drawing is based on a stillshot photograph of Yao Ming captured from a post-game press conference in May 2009.



    Richard Sherman’s Postgame Interview

    Richard Sherman’s Postgame Rant refers to televised taunts uttered by Seattle Seahawks’ cornerback during an interview following his team’s 23-17 victory over the San Francisco 49ers in January 2014.



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/27/15--09:29: Ironic Memes
  • About

    Ironic Memes are memes used satirically, usually by being deliberately humorless, crude, or overused, as a way to indirectly criticize meme culture, which has been considered by some to have become overused and un-funny with time, usually due to The Family Guy Effect. Its purpose is normally to catch new Internet users off guard. The use of ironic memes normally includes intentional overuse of older Internet phenomena, such as 1337 speak or rage comics, as well as the use of the word “meme” as a replacement for some parts of speech, usually nouns or verbs.

    Origin

    Much of the ironic humor originates from memes that by internet standards would be considered old or overused, such as trollface by new people on the internet, so it has evolved to be used to criticize said new people.

    The first instances of ironic memes date back to the creation of the 4chan board /s4s/[1] (shit 4chan says) on pril 1st, 2013, which was an april fools joke board created entirely for nonsensical shitposting, however the board has kept being online even after april fools, the board focuses on constantly making ironic “memes” out of everyday objects as well as other nonsensical threads

    Spread

    Multiple new memes have appeared that form its humor on an ironic basis as well as criticizing the non ironic types.

    Joke Fandoms


    “Joke fandoms” refer to fandoms that have spawned to ironically praise material (normally in obsessive ways) that by other means would be see as humorless, crude and dull. Popular joke fandoms include Shrek and Cory in The House, the fandoms are a joke towards certain internet fandoms that are known for their over-obsession and zealous devotion which are found on sites like tumblr.

    Montage Parodies


    Montage Parodies are a series of ironic video remixes that rely on loud dubstep music and quick footage to the point of annoyance, the videos include overuse of gamer culture memes and stoner culture (as well as other ones that it has created) to a point they lose their comedic value, which on itself takes a jab at real montage parodies and overused gamer memes, as well as the use of drugs to look cool.

    Dank Memes


    Dank Memes is a phrase used in a condescending and ironic manner to refer to injokes that have lost their comedic value but continue to be posted

    Coaxed into a snafu



    Coaxed Into a Snafu” refers to a series of poorly drawn rage comic and advice animal characters that are captioned with variations of popular Internet catchphrases. The illustrations typically mock the way Internet memes are incorrectly used on sites like 9gag and Reddit.

    Meta use

    Throughout the ironic subculture, it is worth noting that the word on itself is used normally to replace nouns, adjectives and even verbs giving it an universal use, other uses includes the ironic praise of memes as the highest form of comedy, as a way of life, or the answer to important questions.

    Search Interest

    Note: Due to the fact that the “ironic meme” subculture takes its popularity based on other memes, there isn’t a high search interest on the term itself and more on the derivatives of the sub-culture.


    External References.

    [1]4chan – /s4s/


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  • 01/27/15--11:12: #Blessed
  • About

    #Blessed is a hashtag widely used on social media to express gratitude for fortunate circumstances in everyday life. It has been also used ironically by those who perceive the hashtag as being too self-gratuitous or humblebragging.

    Origin

    The exact origin of #hashtag blessed is unknown. On January 5th, 2011, the music blog PigeonsAndPlanes[1] highlighted a Vice documentary about rapper Lil B and referenced “#blessed” when expressing gratitude for the rapper’s work.

    “Personally, I am glad that Lil B exists. I think he is #rare, very #based, and we are all #blessed for his presence.”

    Spread

    On December 16th, 2012, the college student blog Honestly, Mansbee[2] published an post titled “I hate when white girls user the hashtag blessed.” On November 25th, 2013, Redditor Xx420_YoLoSwaG_420xX submitted a multi-pane Parks and Recreation comic titled “#blessed,” featuring screen captures from a scene in which the character Tom Haverford reads a “#blessed” tweet (shown below). Prior to being archived, the post gained over 2,500 votes (86% upvoted) and 100 comments on the /r/funny[3] subreddit.



    On December 9th, 2013, “#blessed” was featured in a list titled “15 Twitter Jokes We Can Retire Now” on the pop culture blog Complex.[4] On May 2nd, 2014, The New York Times[5] published an article about the growing backlash to the hashtag. Over the next two months, several news sites published articles about the hashtag’s online reception, including Slate,[6] The Huffington Post[7][8] and Elite Daily.[9] On September 25th, the men’s interest blog Details[12] highlighted a photo of rapper Drake with a #blessed prayer hands emoji tattoo (shown below).



    On October 19th, BuzzFeed[10] published a compilation #blessed tweets. On December 12th, a second compilation was featured on the viral content site.[11]



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 01/27/15--11:19: Valve, Add This Please!
  • The entry is researching and in progress.


    ░░░░░░░░░░░░▄▄                     
    ░░░░░░░░░░░█░░█                  
    ░░░░░░░░░░░█░░█                  
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    ███████▄▄█░░░░░██████▄ 
    ▓▓▓▓▓▓█░░░░░░░░░░░░░░█ 
    ▓▓▓▓▓▓█░░░░ Valve, ░░░░░█ 
    ▓▓▓▓▓▓█░░░░Add this ░░░░█ 
    ▓▓▓▓▓▓█░░░░please!░░░░░█
    ▓▓▓▓▓▓█░░░░░░░░░░░░░░█ 
    ▓▓▓▓▓▓█████░░░░░░░░░█   
    ██████▀░░░░▀▀██████▀     
    h2. About

    Valve, Add this please! is a phrase commonly used on ASCII Art featuring Facebook’s like button to spam Steam forums, particularly Steam Workshop [1] and Steam Greenlight [2].

    Origin

    ‘Valve, Add this please!’ ASCII is created out of 5 unicode symbols including: Light Shade “░” – 0×2591, Dark Shade “▓” – 0×2593, Full Block “█” – 0×2588, Upper Half Block “▀” – 0×2580 and Lower Half Block “▄” – 0×2584. The picture was first used on Steam Greenlight’s 8BitMMO game’s forum, first posted on August 30, 2012 at 4:13pm by user Gregabeast as a simplier version without text on [3]. The phrase itself come from McPixel forum on August 30, 3:09pm. It was created by user Melonhead in form of ‘MCPIXEL, STEAMADD IT PLEASEAND IT SHOULD BE FREE TO PLAY!!1[4].

    Precursor

    In 2011, an ASCII focusing on the same like button became popular on facebook as “Like ASCII[5].

    Spread

    Both the phrase and the picture gained popularity on Steam forums. The sentence was reused at 3:42pm by Expand Dongle [6]. The ASCII was copied three times by BlueFox, first at 4:15pm and Vimy at 4:18pm [7][8]. From 2012 up to now, people created over 25 variantions of ‘Valve, Add this please!’ and wrote over 1 000 related comments.

    Derative: Mega Ultra Epic

    This ASCII is originating from Steam Workshop. It shortly after leaked out to Steam Greenlight, generally used in combination of ‘Mega Ultra’ and ‘Valve, Add this please! And give me one!’. However, it got bad reception from Team Fortress 2 and Dota 2 players [9][10].

    █▄░▄█░█▀▀░█▀▀▀░ █▀█  
    █░█░█░█▀░░█░▀█░█▀▀█
    ▀░▀░▀░▀▀▀░▀▀▀▀░▀░░▀
    █░░█░█░▀▀█▀▀░█▀█░ █▀█  
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    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Steam – Workshop

    [2]Steam – Greenlight

    [3]Steam – 8MitMMO:: Comments

    [4]Steam – McPixel:: Comments

    [5]fb-fun.de – coole Pinnwand ASCII Bilder / Posted on 1-19-2011

    [6]Steam – Organ Trail: Director’s Cut:: Comments

    [7]Steam – Towns:: Comments

    [8]Steam – Gnomoria:: Comments

    [9]Steam – What is up with these “SUPERMEGAULTRAEPIC” on the workshop ? / Posted on 10-19-2014

    [10]Reddit – Why do people spam “mega ultra epic” under Workshop admissions? / Posted on 8-9-2014


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  • 01/27/15--13:43: Tendies
  • About

    “Tendies” is a slang term for “chicken tenders” that is often featured in green text stories featuring a twenty-something man who lives at his mother’s home and demands she cook him “tendies” in exchange for “good boy points.”

    Origin

    On January 17th, 2015 /r9k/ (robot 9000) board

    Spread

    On January 25th, Mumsnet[2] user Janice1975 submitted a post to the parenting message board asking for advice on how to deal with her 22-year-old son who exchanges “good boy points” for “tendies.” The post was subsequently deleted. On January 26th, a screenshot of the post was submitted to the /r/4chan[3] subreddit, where it gained over 1,000 votes (92% upvoted) and 70 comments in 48 hours.



    The same day, a green text story was submitted to the /r9k/ board about a son who urinates all over his mother and her boyfriend in order to get tendies (shown below). On January 26th, a screenshot of the post was submitted to the /r/4chan[5] subreddit, where it received more than 1,300 votes (93% upvoted) in the first 24 hours.

    On January 26th, an anonymous 4chan user submitted a “Chicken Tendies General” thread to the /ck/[4] (cooking) board.

    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References


    0 0

    Overview

    2015 U.S. Northeastern Blizzard, also known as The Blizzard of 2015 or Winter Storm Juno, is a currently active heavy snowstorm moving across the Central and Eastern coast of the United States. Upon its landfall in late January 2015, the storm led to the suspension of thousands of flights and rail services across the country and declaration of snow emergency in at least six states, including travel bans at nighttime in New Jersey and New York City.

    Background

    On January 23rd, 2015, a rapid development of a low-pressure area was detected off the Pacific Northwest, which quickly made its way inward across the Canadian Prairies, then southeastward into the Upper Midwest, before it began approaching northeast towards New England in the typical fashion of a Nor’easter, a macro-scale storm that moves along the upper East Coast of the United States on a recurring basis. By January 25th, official blizzard warnings had been issued in several states along the East Coast, including New York, Massachusetts and New Jersey, while meteorologist projected a forecast of a potentially historic storm that could pile up to two to three feet (0.61 meter to 0.91 meter) in the New York City metropolitan area. On the early morning of January 26th, the storm began to sweep across the East Coast and continued throughout the day, covering a 250-mile area between New York City and Boston with up to 25 inches of snow. Later that same day, many roads and public transit services in New York and New England states were shut down in anticipation of life-threatening road conditions.

    Notable Developments

    [researching]

    Search Interest



    External References


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