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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 12/15/14--11:19: #Metalgate
  • About

    #Metalgate is a Twitter hashtag campaign deriving from the GamerGate controversy as a way of protesting against stereotypes surrounding the metal culture and being portrayed as having conservative ideas by Social Justice Bloggers. Since its inception, boosted by GamerGate supporters, articles were made to comment on this new movement’s legitimacy.

    Origin

    On December 12th, 2014, Death Metal Underground writer Cory Van der Pol issued an article titled #metalgate[1] which dealt with the coming of a new hashtag campaign on Twitter[2], launched by GamerGate supporters but targetting Metal culture, asserting that it started following a peculiar extract from an article by Spin about the twenty best metal albums of 2014[3] (shown below).

    Metal is still dogged by the issues that arise from its deep-seated conservative values, but thanks to an increase in conversations about racism, politics, and feminism, those on the right side of history have gained solid ground.

    The Death Metal Underground article offers an opinion piece on the current state of Metal culture, also quoting a Washington Post article from 2006[4] which is asserted to have been reused by activists to justify their new movement.

    Spread

    The next day, Youtuber and GamerGate activist Sargon of Akkad uploaded a video in favor of this new trend (shown below), analyzing different articles including the Spin and Washington Post ones but others as well such as an opinion piece from Metal Injection commenting on the increasing use of the slur “faggot” among metalhead communities[5].

    The video has gathered more than 40 000 views in two days. A sub-reddit was created and subsequently banned before another one, Metal Ghazi, took its place[10].
    As the trend garnered more and more tweets online, several articles were made commenting on whether the movement is a legitimate one or not, addresing its links with GamerGate. Some are in favor of the initiative, such as Servile Insurrection[6] or Return of Kings[7] while others like Medium[8] or Metal-related website Metal Sucks[9], not so.

    External References


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  • 12/15/14--12:05: amiibo
  • Work in progress, images to be added as soon as i can get them in the galleries

    amiibo are figurines produced by Nintendo to be used in conjunction with specific video games, most notably Super Smash Bros. for 3DS and Wii U.[1] Since their unveil at E3 in 2014, the toys have developed an online following.

    History

    On June 10, 2014, during Nintendo’s Digital Event at E3 that year, amiibos were unveiled as figurines that would use near-field communications (NFC) to interact with and unlock content in specific games, such as the then-to-be-released Super Smash Bros. for 3DS and Wii U. The first wave of twelve amiibo were released on November 21, 2014, and a second wave of five new models was released in December 2014. A third wave was announced in November 2014, slated for release in North America in February 2015. [2]

    Fandom

    The same day amiibo were revealed, the subreddit /r/amiibo was created as a discussion place for the figurines. [3]

    wip

    Notable Events

    Prototypes Vs. Finals

    A huge uproar rose online about the quality of amiibos when released in comparison with the planned prototypes and was mentioned by gaming websites such as Kotaku.[11] Marth and Link’s amiibos received the overall most backlash for looking significantly poorer in quality on release than people were led to believe from pre-release pictures.



    Factory Defects

    Soon after the first wave of amiibo were released, several customers reported finding defective amiibo. On Novemebr 22, 2014, Reddit user Adamantium126 shared an image on /r/gaming of a Samus Aran amiibo which had two arm cannons, which was later auctioned off on eBay for $2,500. [4][5] Similarly, in December 2014, a legless Princess Peach amiibo was auctioned off at $25,100. These events were reported by several gaming news sites, such as GameSpot and Kotaku. [7][8]


    Custom amiibo

    Also after the first wave of amiibo were released, several hobbyists customized their figures and posted them online. In 2014, a website dedicated to custom amiibos was created, alongside a Tumblr page. [9][10]wip wip wip!




    Google Search Interest

    References


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  • 12/15/14--12:44: Clickbait
  • [Work in progress]

    About

    “Clickbait” is an Internet slang term for viral content and sensational headlines produced by websites for the sole purpose of accumulating pageviews in order to generate advertising revenue. It is often used as a pejorative for content that spreads through social networking sites and lacks depth, quality, authenticity or accuracy.

    Origin

    [Researching]

    Spread

    [Researching]

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 12/15/14--12:53: The Joker
  • About

    The Joker is a fictional character who appears in DC Comics. He is the arch-nemesis of Batman and other heroes. He has rose to popularity since his appearance in the 2008 film The Dark Knight where he was played by actor Heath Ledger. He is a highly acclaimed character, ranking as the 2nd best comic book villan by IGN.

    Origin

    [Work in Progress]

    Spread

    [Work in Progress]

    Sub-Memes

    [Work in Progress]


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  • 12/15/14--14:43: Put Em in a Coffin
  • About

    Put Em in a Coffin is series of Vines in which a person crosses their arms and jumps on an object, usually on another person, or a hood of a car.

    Origin

    The trend begun when VonMar, a member of the rap group ThotBoyz posted a number of vines featuring the move in late May, one of them receiving the most popularity, posted on June 11, 2014 (shown below), it then began to trend, the vine has achieved 2,814,919 loops, 62.3K Likes, 62.1K Revines and 4,060 Comments, becoming the most popular up to date.



    Spread

    On June 12, 2014 vine user Matthew Espinosa 2 uploaded a vine of him saying “put em in a coffin” before jumping on a table full of people, the video has gained 2,872,102 loops, 127.8K Likes, 49.7K Revines and 3,258 Comments.



    In the next months, multiple vines started appearing featuring people shouting “Put em in a coffin” before jumping on different objects including cars.

    On June 10, 2014 YouTube user OMGVines posted a video compilation including vines of the fad.



    Notable Examples

    Search Interest


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  • 12/15/14--15:22: Trigger
  • About

    Triggers is a term used online to indicate situations and phrases that set people off (known as Triggering). Although initially made popular through the Social Justice blogging sphere, the term gained most of its popularity through ironic usage by mocking groups that use the term over things that are usually considered to be trivial or irrelevant.

    Origin

    The word originated from the psychological phrase “trauma trigger,”[1] or something that causes a traumatic past event to come back into memory clearly, which are usually known as episodes. The term is known to be related to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD),[2] a disorder that can develop after a person is exposed to one or more traumatic events, indicated through symptoms such as disturbing recurring flashbacks.

    Spread

    The phrase became notorious mostly on the social media website Tumblr for over-use and twisting of the original definition in reference to being “triggered” over things that are usually considered to be trivial or common first world problems. In April 2014, Washington resident Melody Hensley (shown below) claimed that cyberbullies on Twitter caused her to get PTSD. The story was subsequently covered by various news outlets, such as the Dailydot,[3] the Daily Mail,[4] Fashion Times[5] and Fox;[6] while Hensley’s claims were mostly met with skepticism.



    In the popular online webcomic Homestuck, the character Kankri Vantas[7] often uses the term, which was inspired by Tumblr as confirmed by Homestuck author Andrew Hussie.[8]



    Criticism

    Triggered has come to be noticed by the internet usually mostly through its intense criticism[9] and the surplus of satire directed at the word. The arguments usually center around whether one can really be triggered online and where the line should be crossed on being offended or medically triggered.

    Search Interest


    External References


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  • 12/16/14--03:06: Booker, Catch!
  • About

    “Booker, Catch!” is a phrase said by the character Elizabeth throughout the 2013 video game BioShock Infinite.

    Origin

    Throughout the game, Elizabeth can assist Booker (the player’s character) in gunfights by bringing in objects such as medical supplies or turrets from alternate worlds through ‘tears’ in their reality. This meme branches off from her assistance, as she can also find medical supplies and ammo to throw to Booker, in which she will alert the player by saying she’s found something, with phrases such as “Ammo! Take it!” or “You’re bleeding!”, with the most common saying being “Booker, catch!”. Because the phrase is mentioned many times throughout the game, it has become a inside joke amongst BioShock fans along the lines of “Would you kindly?” or the Andrew Ryan speech from the first game.

    Spread

    Notable Examples

    Search Insights

    External References


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  • 12/16/14--11:58: Cory in the House
  • Very Work In Progress. Feel free to request editorship

    Cory in the House is television series which aired from January 12th, 2007 to September 13, 2008 as a spin-off from the Disney show That’s So Raven.


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  • 12/16/14--12:06: Trap Music
  • About

    Trap music is a rhythm music genre mostly being known as a complimation of background hip hop pump-up tracks. It has been originated in the early 1990s United States. It is recognised with powerful kicks, snaps or simply rhythm instruments.
    As an online subculture this music genre has gained attention with various catchphases, Turn Down For What soundtrack and Montage Parody subculture.

    History

    In early 1980, programmable drum machines (for example Roland TR-808) were came out and used as a drum base on rap genre.[1] As a different rhythm source, drum machines provided different compose of the background hitats, kicks and drums; portrayed more powerful bass and dance concept.

    Reception

    Related Memes

    Damn Son! Where’d You Find This?

    Damn son! Where’d you find this? Is a popular sound sample or trap music drop used very often on trap musics.[2] The origin sample has been voiced by the 42 year old music producer Shadoehaze[3].

    On Feb 6, 2013; the producer Shadoehaze uploaded an introduction video to brief more information behind the popular sound sample made by himself. On Dec 27, 2013 the website Vice has published an article detailing other infos about the Shadoehaze. On Sep 10, 2014 youtuber Nyanners published a rap cover “I am ur leader” featuring the sample at the beginning.

    Real Trap Shit

    Turn Down For What?

    Airhorn

    Search Interest

    References

    [1]RunTheTrap – What is trap music

    [2]Urban Dictionary – Damn Son

    [3]Soundcloud – Shadoehaze

    [4]Vice – I found the DSHDYFT Guy


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    About

    The phrase “Bitch you guessed it!” is a lyric taken from the rap song “U Guessed It” by rapper OG Maco. It is often used as an aggressive response to a person that gave a random answer that was correct. Often it is followed by a following lyric “You was right!” which is said in a less aggressive manner. The lyrics became famous among the Vine community due to it’s bi-polar nature and later spread out into various areas on the internet.

    Origin

    The song “U Guessed It” by OG Maco had it’s video released on August 28, 2014 [1], where it has currently gained over 15 million views.



    Vine Origin

    One of the earliest examples of the song’s use on Vine was the Vine titled “The Excited Bipolar Teacher” by viner Reggie COUZ, which was uploaded on September 10, 2014 [2].



    Impact

    In mid-September, the phrase took off greatly and several other Vines started to use the sample of the song.

    Other Vines



    Youtube Vine Compilation



    Image Examples



    Search Interest



    External Reference

    [1]Youtube – OG Maco – U Guessed It

    [2]Vine – The excited bipolar teacher


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  • 12/16/14--21:03: Death Grips
  • stay noided

    About

    Death Grips is an experimental hip hop[1] band from Sacramento, California consisting of Drummer Zach Hill[2], producer Andy Morin and vocalist and frontman Stefan “MC Ride” Burnett[3], the group has been popular[4] for their combination of Noise Music, Industrial Music and Hip Hop, the group rose to popularity is mainly acredited to the 4chan board /mu/, who considers their work to be an essential must listen based on the high number of discussions they spawn there.

    Online history

    Death Grips released the first single of their mixtape “Exmilitary”[5] (which then would be released on April 25, 2011) titled “Guillotine(It Goes Yah)” on August 3, 2011

    The Single received positive reviews due to MC Ride´s aggresive nature and violent lyrics, and the group’s odd, loud and erratic glitchy production, giving the feeling of a guillotine descending, critics also cited the simplicity of the video, consisting of MC Ride rapping while sitting in the passenger seat of a car in motion on a transited road with the seat belt on as static sorrounds him, sometimes screaming the word guillotine as the music gains momentum and the video distortions and slows down.

    The Video has received 2,563,303 views and 14,516 likes, also becoming their most popular song up-to-date, launching them to internet popularity.

    No Love Deep Web ARG

    After the release of their critically acclaimed album, The Money Store, Death Grips suddenly dropped all of their scheduled concerts because they were working on a new album, which according to the post would be called “No Love” (later named No Love Deep Web). A few hours later, a thread was anonymously posted with an edited photo from this Pitchfork article, and a link to an encrypted photo only accesible by Tor Network. Originally, most were skeptical, but eventually people checked it, to find an encrypted photo, which had the note “NO LOVEDEEPWEBCOMING OCTOBER23 M0RE TO COME”. After more search, a copy of The Money Store Unmastered was uncovered.

    Related memes

    No Love Deep Web Album Cover

    Noided

    “Birds, Fuck You”

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Wikipedia – Experimental Hip Hop

    [2]Wikipedia – Zach Hill

    [3]Wikipedia – MC Ride

    [4]Spin – ARTIST OF THEYEAR: DEATHGRIPS

    [5]Wikipedia – Exmilitary


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  • 12/17/14--13:49: I Crave That Mineral
  • About

    “I Crave That Mineral” is an expression stemming from a captioned photograph of an ibex licking salt off the side of a mountain that was submitted to Tumblr in late October 2014.

    Origin

    On October 27th, 2014, Tumblr[2] user sixpenceee posted a photograph of an Alpine ibex licking salt deposits off a mountainside with the caption “They crave that mineral” (shown below). In the first two months, the post gained over 283,000 notes.



    Spread

    On December 14th, 2014, Tumblr[3] user Meladoodle submitted a text post saying “Me giving head: I crave that mineral,” which gathered more than 4,400 notes in 72 hours. On the following day, YouTuber Suicide Balloons uploaded a parody of the 2011 pop song “What Makes You Beautiful” by One Direction titled “Crave That Mineral” (shown below).



    On December 16th, a Wikipedia[1] page titled “I crave that mineral” was created, which was subsequently selected for deletion. The same day, Tumblr[4] user floozys declared that the catchphrase was “the most unexpected, late entry meme of 2014.” Also on December 16th, Tumblr user Mikasa-Ackerman posted a screen capture from the anime Attack on Titan with the caption “she craves that mineral,” garnering upwards of 9,400 notes in 24 hours (shown below, left). Meanwhile, Tumblr[5] user santakuroo uploaded a photoshopped version of the original ibex image featuring That Feel Guy and Sad Frog, gaining more than 21,300 notes over the next day (shown below, right).



    Notable Examples




    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References


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    About

    “About a week ago” is a lyric from the rap song “Hot Nigga” by Bobby Shmurda. The lyric and the “Schmoney Dance” featured in the video became famous through Vine and later became a meme through this.

    Origin

    The song was released on July 25, 2014 and the video was posted to Youtube through Shmurda’s VEVO account on August 1 of the same year [1].



    Vine Origin

    The earliest Vine posted featuring the meme was one posted by Viner DontéMacc who posted his Vine the same day as the single’s release [2].



    Impact

    In early August, the popularity of the line and dance exploded in popularity on Vine [3] and helped the song itself peak at #6 on the Billboard Hot 100 [4].

    Other Vines



    Youtube Vine Compilation



    Image Examples



    Search Interest



    External Reference

    [1]Youtube – Bobby Shmurda – Hot N*gga

    [2]Vine – About a week ago

    [3]HotNewHipHop – Bobby Shmurda Confirms Chris Brown & More For “Hot Nigga” Official Remix

    [4]Billboard Hot 100 – Bobby Shmurda – Chart history


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  • 12/17/14--18:34: Benny Benassi - Cinema
  • About

    Cinema is a 2011 electronic dubstep song performed by Italian DJ and record producer Marco Benassi, better known by his stage name Benny Benassi. The song is used most often in humorous YouTube videos and usually at the climax of most montage parodies, where the song is right about to drop the bass.

    Origin

    On March 28, 2011, music producer company Ultra Music uploaded the official music video of the song to their YouTube channel[1], acquiring 8 million views and 36,000 likes. (shown below)

    Reception

    After the song’s original release, Review-Fi[2] praised the song for having catchy lyrics and being sung in soprano, claiming the song itself was “overly addicting”. However, they said that this couldn’t be said for all the remixes of the song, including Skrillex’s. The last sentence exclaimed, “If you’re going to get any of them[remixes], get Benassi’s.”

    Spread

    On June 9, 2011, American electronic dance music producer, DJ, and singer-songwriter Sonny John Moore, best known by his stage name Skrillex, remixed the song and uploaded it onto YouTube[3], gaining 8 million views and almost 60,000 likes as of December 2014. (shown below)

    In September 2011, YouTuber Sqrillex (a play on the word “Skrillex”) uploaded another variation of the tune[4], gaining 58 million views and knocking in 310,000 likes. (shown below)

    The earliest known video parodying the song was a montage of YouTuber MrPredatorzHD playing Call of Duty 4 uploaded only days after Sqrillex’s upload of the song; MrPredatorzHD’s video[5] got 5,000 views and only 68 likes as of December 2014. (shown below)

    Notable Examples

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1] YouTube – Benny Benassi – Cinema
    [2] Review-Fi – Review on Cinema
    [3] YouTube – BENNYBENASSICINEMA
    [4] YouTube – Skrillex – Cinema
    [5] YouTube – MrPredatorzHD CoD 4 Montage


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  • 12/18/14--06:13: Bootleg
  • About

    It’s the act of selling illegal items,usually video games or toys.It happens mostly in east Asian country’s(Mostly in china).

    History

    In the 1880s the word was first used to denote the practice of concealing flasks of illicit liquor in boot tops when going to trade with Indians.Since then,the word has been used to signal an illegal item being sold,Mostly being copyrighted material.

    Impact

    Generally,Bootlegging left a negative impression at the general public,As some are copyrighted material.However,It still remains one of the most biggest fads,as it continues to grow.Along with that,A website was created to document all the bootleg game and consoles named bootleggames wiki .

    examples of bootleg

    Sense of right alliance:A bootleg of the justice league,this toy appeared in tumbler and exploded in popularity due to its bizarre factor.The team consists of : Lighting Mcqueen,Yellow/blue/red power ranger,superman,batman,spiderman and shrek.

    photos




    Somari:Another famous bootleg,made in early 1994,this bootleg is a combination of Sonic the hedgehog and Super Mario.Made by a company named Hummer team.The Game is Widely known by both communities.

    photos




    search interest


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  • 12/18/14--08:53: Hatred Controversy
  • Overview

    Hatred is an upcoming third-person shooter PC video game in development by Polish studio Destructive Creations and scheduled for release in 2015. Due to the highly controversial premise of the game, in which the protagonist embarks on a “genocide crusade”[1] to murder innocent civilians and law enforcement officers, Hatred immediately became a hot topic of controversy within online gaming communities upon its Greenlight reception on Valve’s Steam in December 2014.

    Background

    On October 16th, 2014 Destructive Creations announced its first title Hatred by releasing a teaser trailer on YouTube. The premiere of the trailer, which features in-game screenshots and footage of the protagonist picking weapons and killing people in grimdark settings, was characterized as “controversial” by multiple video game bloggers.[2][3]



    Gameplay

    In the game, the player assumes the role of a villain protagonist who begins a massive genocide mission to “cleanse” the society by killing innocent civilians, as well as law enforcement and military personnel. According to the developers’ description, Hatred
    was conceived as a reactionary experiment to the current zeitgeist in the video gaming industry that focuses on vivid colors and political correctness.

    Notable Developments

    Epic Games’ Statement

    On October 16th, 2014, Epic Games, the creators of Unreal Engine, issued a statement requesting Destructive Creations to remove its logo from the trailer and other promotional materials for the title.

    “Epic Games isn’t involved in this project. Unreal Engine 4 is available to the general public for use ‘for any lawful purpose,’ and we explicitly don’t exert any sort of creative control or censorship over projects. However, the video is using the trademarked Unreal Engine 4 logo without permission from Epic, and we’ve asked for the removal of our logo from all marketing associated with this product.”

    Steam Greenlight

    On December 15th, Hatred was submitted to Steam Greenlight, where it quickly began climbing up the charts to the top ten list, but later that same day, a Valve employee confirmed that the title wouldn’t be approved for release in an e-mail to the video game news site Polygon.

    “Based on what we’ve seen on Greenlight we would not publish Hatred on Steam. […] As such we’ll be taking it down.”

    Shortly afterwards, Hatred was removed from Steam Greenlight, due to its violent content. In response, Destructive Creations released a statement to address the removal of the title.

    Dear Hatred Fans,

    As you know today we’ve launched our Steam Greenlight campaign for Hatred. Unfortunately after couple of hours Steam shut it down giving the below as reasons behind their decision:

    “We wanted you guys to know that based on what we see on Greenlight we would not publish Hatred on Steam. As such we’ll be taking it down.”

    Even though games like Manhunt or Postal are still available on Steam we of course fully respect Valve’s decision, as they have the right to do so. In the same time we want to assure you that this won’t in any way impact the game’s development, game’s vision or gameplay features we’re aiming for. The game is still to be released in Q2 2015 as planned.

    Moreover we don’t treat this as a failure because yet again this showed us a huge community support we’re totally overwhelmed with. After only a couple of hours Greenlight campaign being live, Hatred gathered 13,148 up votes and ended up on a #7 on Top 100 list.

    This is the best proof for us that there are diehard Hatred fans out there, waiting for this game to be released. And that we need to keep going to deliver them a game that offers exciting and challenging gameplay.

    The whole situation only pushes us forward to go against any adversity and not to give up. It also makes us want to provide our fans Hatred pre-orders sooner, as many of you have asked for them.

    At the end of the day you, gamers will judge if we were able to do a game that’s simply fun to play.

    Destructive Creations Team


    Reinstatement on Steam Greenlight

    But on the following day, Hatred was reinstated on the service with a personal apology from Gabe Newell]

    “Yesterday I heard that we were taking Hatred down from Greenlight. Since I wasn’t up to speed, I asked around internally to find out why we had done that. It turns out that it wasn’t a good decision, and we’ll be putting Hatred back up. My apologies to you and your team. Steam is about creating tools for content creators and customers.”

    Search Interest



    External References


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  • 12/18/14--10:54: Swiss Army Knives
  • About

    The Swiss Army Knife is a multi-purpose tool invented by Switzerland for use in WWII. The knife has become iconic in being more than just a knife. This characteristic of the Swiss Army Knife is often parodied and exaggerated online.

    Origin

    During the late 1880s, the Swiss Army decided to purchase a new folding pocket knife for their soldiers. This knife was to be suitable for use by the army in opening canned food and disassembling the Swiss service rifle. In January 1891, the knife received the official designation Modell 1890[1].

    Spread

    According to Carl Elsener, head of Victorinox in 2009, US soldiers bought Swiss Army knives in huge numbers at PX stores on military bases following the conclusion of the Second World War. As German: Schweizer Offiziersmesser was too difficult for them to say, they called it the “Swiss Army knife”, the name by which the knife is now most commonly known worldwide[1]. The design of the knife and its versatility have both led to worldwide recognition.

    Notable Examples


    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Wikipedia – Swiss Army Knife


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  • 12/18/14--14:26: Achievement Hunter
  • About
    Achievement Hunter is an ongoing series created by Rooster Teeth staff member Geoff Ramsey, in which staff members and contributors from the community demonstrate how to earn achievements in various games and enjoy them in various ways.

    Origins
    Achievement Hunter was born from Pattillo and Ramsey’s interest in gaming achievements and the realization that there wasn’t a community-based achievement website. In turn Achievement Hunter was created, which shares the design, user profiles and forums of the main Rooster Teeth website. The site regularly releases achievement guides, Easter egg videos, and select volunteers from the Rooster Teeth community to help moderate the website. The Achievement Hunter Twitter handle is @AchievementHunt.

    The most frequent videos come from the six most prolific employees and top golden Achievement Hunter cast members: Geoff Ramsey (RT co-founder / AH co-founder), Jack Pattillo (Achievement Hunter’s first employee), Gavin Free (RvB Season 7 director / Host of The Slow-Mo Guys), Ray Narvaez, Jr. (Community Hunter turned full-time employee), Michael Jones (Host of Rage Quit), and Ryan Haywood (Game Fails manager). Unlike any other dedicated-achievement website, Achievement Hunter is highly dependent on public contributions and has guides across different games and platforms, allowing the site to expand its focus from Xbox 360 games to those on PC, PS3, Steam, iPhone, and Windows Phone 7. Along with the main Rooster Teeth website, Achievement Hunter has achieved great popularity since its inception.


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  • 12/18/14--19:35: Rape Culture
  • About

    “Rape Culture” is the concept that sexual assault and rape is normalized or encouraged by society through biases regarding sex and gender, including forms of victim blaming like “slut shaming.” The theory has been hotly debated within and outside of feminist academic circles over what constitutes rape culture and whether it is overemphasized as a cause of rape in Western society.

    Origin

    According to Wikipedia,[1]“rape culture” was initially coined by second wave feminists in the 1970s to raise awareness about the prevalence of rape in American culture, which some argued was a result of widespread misogyny and sexism in society. On October 31st, 1974, the book Rape: The First Sourcebook for Women by New York Radical Feminists was released, which contained the first published use of the phrase. In 1975, the documentary film Rape Culture was released, which investigates the concept cultural normalization of rape of men and women (shown below).



    Spread

    On November 26th, 2001, The Michigan Daily[3] published an article titled “Fraternities and a heightened rape culture.” On March 4th, 2008, YouTuber Tyler Funk uploaded a video titled “Rape Culture Warning: Contains Potential PTSD Triggers,” which contained a series of video clips with voice-over narration about rape culture (shown below, left). On December 12th, 2012, feminist comedian Jamie Kilstein uploaded a video of his stand-up titled “Rape Culture and Glenn Beck Doesn’t Like Me” (shown below, right).



    On March 20th, 2013, YouTuber Laci Green uploaded a video titled “WTF Happened in Steubenville?”, which argued that the events surrounding the Steubenville rape case were evidence of a pervasive rape culture (shown below).



    Critcism

    On October 25th, 2013, The Amazing Atheist uploaded a video titled “There’s No Rape Culture,” which criticized the way Internet feminists use the phrase “rape culture” (shown below, left). In February 2014, the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN) issued a press release[2] which criticized blaming “rape culture” for the cause of all sexual violence committed on campuses, arguing that it had “the paradoxical effect of making it harder to stop sexual violence.” On May 19th, the American Enterprise Institute YouTube channel uploaded a “Factual Feminist” video titled “Rape culture panic is not the answer,” in which host Christina Hoff Sommers argued that feminist activists at universities were overwmp



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 12/18/14--19:46: I SEE MONSTAS - Holdin' On
  • About

    Holdin’ On, also known as My Hope Will Never Die, is an electronic dance song performed by the British electronic music band group I SEEMONSTAS. The song is best known as appearing in various YouTube videos as a buildup to the climax in montage parodies often after the main character fakes death or just a generalized buildup where the song is about to drop the bass

    Origin

    On September 6, 2012, I SEEMONSTAS released the official music video on YouTube[1] which gained 722,000 views and 5,000 likes as of December 2014. (shown below)


    Spread

    On October 1st, 2012, American electronic dance artist and DJ Sonny John Moore, better known by his stage name Skrillex, and fellow producer artist only known by his stage name Nero remixed the song[2] and uploaded it onto YouTube, acquiring 3 million views and 33,000 likes since December 2014. (shown below)


    The song was laid to rest until late 2013, when YouTuber VEXDrum&Bass uploaded Skrillex and Nero’s remix of the song, only this time the title was branded with Dr as the artist. As of December 2014, the video[3] has earned almost 485,000 views and 7,000 likes. (shown below)


    In February of 2014, a montage parody of the new Sonic Boom trailer was uploaded onto YouTube featuring the song after joking about Skrillex’s pseudo death, describing it as a “spooky motorboat accident”. As of December 2014, the video[3] has earned 26,000 views and 300 likes. (shown below)


    Notable Examples

    Search Interest

    External References


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